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Why should I pay for prescriptions?

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Are you sure some people aren't just showing a pre-payment card and that's why you're not seeing any money changing hands?

 

It isn't strictly necessary even to show the card. The pharmacy will simply mark whether or not they've seen evidence.

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Basically every time an average joe in Ireland has to see a GP in the surgery or a home call out they can charge you anything up to about 60 euros. Unless you have a medical expemption card from the government or have special needs.

 

On the flip side there is usually no charges for prescriptions or medical equipment except very specialist stuff (which is usually capped to 120 euros per year).

 

However, if you go to the A+E in Ireland (without a GP referral) the charge can be anything up to 100 euro.

 

Like everything there are some exemptions and rules can sometimes be waived.

 

The point is I would still rather have our health service and pay the odd £7.40 charge compared to over the water.

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Basically every time an average joe in Ireland has to see a GP in the surgery or a home call out they can charge you anything up to about 60 euros. Unless you have a medical expemption card from the government or have special needs.

 

On the flip side there is usually no charges for prescriptions or medical equipment except very specialist stuff (which is usually capped to 120 euros per year).

 

However, if you go to the A+E in Ireland (without a GP referral) the charge can be anything up to 100 euro.

 

Like everything there are some exemptions and rules can sometimes be waived.

 

The point is I would still rather have our health service and pay the odd £7.40 charge compared to over the water.

 

Yea, it certainly does look like we get a far better deal here in England.

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From politics.co.uk:

 

NHS prescription charges are paid by patients for drugs or other treatments prescribed for them by a National Health Service medical practitioner.

 

The current (2010) basic NHS prescription charge in England is £7.20p. However, many people are exempt from paying this fee; indeed according to the Government, 88% of prescription items are dispensed free of charge.

 

Those exempt include:

 

Children under 16, pregnant women, people over 60, young people in full-time education, people in receipt of certain benefits such as Income Support or Jobseekers' Allowance and people suffering from specific conditions, such as certain types of physical disability, diabetes, or epilepsy, for which they hold a valid exemption certificate.

 

Prescription Prepayment Certificates (PPC) offer considerable savings to people who are in need of regular prescriptions. As from 1st April 2010 a 3 months PPC costs £28.25 and a 12 months PPC £104. In addition, the NHS Low Income Scheme provides income related help to those not already exempt from NHS charges.

 

These rules apply only to England.

 

Thank you for that information. Need to look more into it but if true, I could save £10.40 a month for the misses' prescriptions.

 

I'd still have to pay for myself though.

 

Edit:

 

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/Free-or-Reduced-Cost-Prescriptions.htm

 

Where does the wife sign to add herself to the 88% who get it for free?

Edited by big_g

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Where does the wife sign to add herself to the 88% who get it for free?

 

Is she diabetic? A doctor or her diabetes nurse has to sign a form to confirm she's medication-dependent.

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Is she diabetic? A doctor or her diabetes nurse has to sign a form to confirm she's medication-dependent.

 

Just checked up - she needs form FP92A from the surgery - fill it in, get it signed by someone at the surgery - send it off - Bob's yer uncle.

 

http://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/HealthCosts/2095.aspx

 

Obviously there'll be some reason why we don't qualify.

 

Can't understand why we haven't been told by the pharmacist - I mean, from the prescription issued it's fairly obvious.

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Obviously there'll be some reason why we don't qualify.

 

Can't understand why we haven't been told by the pharmacist - I mean, from the prescription issued it's fairly obvious.

 

Is she Type 1 or Type 2? It's from a few years ago now but when my other half was diagnosed with Type 1 the diabetes nurse made a comment about Type 2s not getting free prescriptions. I don't know if that was just her personal view.

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^^

 

Think that they're both covered.

 

From here:

 

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/Free-or-Reduced-Cost-Prescriptions.htm

Treatment for cancer; note this includes treatment for the effects of cancer, or treatment for the effects of a current or previous cancer treatment.

A permanent fistula requiring dressing.

Forms of hypoadrenalism such as Addison's disease.

Diabetes insipidus and other forms of hypopituitarism.

Diabetes mellitus except where treatment is by diet alone.

Hypoparathyroidism.

Myxoedema (underactive thyroid) or other conditions where thyroid hormone replacement is necessary.

Myasthenia gravis.

Epilepsy requiring continuous anticonvulsive medication.

A continuing physical disability which means you cannot go out without help from another person.

 

then from here:

http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Diabetes-Mellitus.htm

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease caused by deficiency or diminished effectiveness of endogenous insulin. It is characterised by hyperglycaemia, deranged metabolism and sequelae predominantly affecting the vasculature. The main types of diabetes mellitus are:

 

Type 1 diabetes mellitus: results from the body's failure to produce sufficient insulin.

Type 2 diabetes mellitus: results from resistance to the insulin, often initially with normal or increased levels of circulating insulin.

Gestational diabetes: pregnant women who have never had diabetes before but who have high blood sugar (glucose) levels during pregnancy are said to have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of all pregnant women. It may precede development of type 2 (or rarely type 1).

Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) includes several forms of diabetes with monogenetic defects of β-cell function (impaired insulin secretion); usually manifesting as mild hyperglycaemia at a young age, and usually inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.1,2

 

We'll see what the doctor says.

 

Not holding my breath but ...

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^^Think that they're both covered.

 

According to the Diabetes UK website:

 

Anyone taking insulin or tablets for their diabetes is entitled to an exemption certificate for prescriptions. They last for five years and application forms are available from your GP or post office. People who treat their diabetes with diet alone are not entitled to an exemption certificate.

 

Hope you get it :)

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^^

 

Think that they're both covered.

 

From here:

 

http://www.patient.co.uk/health/Free-or-Reduced-Cost-Prescriptions.htm

 

 

then from here:

http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/Diabetes-Mellitus.htm

 

 

We'll see what the doctor says.

 

Not holding my breath but ...

 

 

 

 

Go on , go for it. Nothing ventured , nothing gained. It would be great to see some good coming out of this thread.:)

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So, myself and my Husband who have both worked non-stop since leaving school, who have paid tax and contributed to National Insurance have to pay for prescriptions ... yet those who have never worked, never intend to work and will never work a day in their lives who haven't contributed to the system get prescriptions for free? It doesn't make sense. Surely the £1000's my Husband and I have spent in tax and NI should pay for a measley course of anti biotics for Tonsilitus? But no, £7 odd to get better!!

 

I am currently pregnant and believe me I'm going to milk it for what it's worth with my Maternity Exemption card. I have eczema so I'm going to get a massive supply of my bio oil, steriod cream, emolients etc and also get myself to the dentist for a check up, polish etc.

 

Get back what I've paid for with tax and NI for all these years as in 18 months time I'll be back to paying!!

 

I agree that OAP's/Children and people with long term medical illnesses should get free prescriptions. But I think everyone else should pay.

 

I have friends who work in pharmacy's and even they have said how disgusting it is that people from other countries come here for HIV/Hep C treatment as it's free. Doctors are giving out 6 months worth of treatment at a time which costs £10,000's because they are going 'back home' (which isn't in England) for the next 6 months. 6 months later they're back claiming they're living in Britain again to get another 6 months worth of treatment and then 'going back home' again.

 

This country is a joke.

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So, myself and my Husband who have both worked non-stop since leaving school, who have paid tax and contributed to National Insurance have to pay for prescriptions ... yet those who have never worked, never intend to work and will never work a day in their lives who haven't contributed to the system get prescriptions for free? It doesn't make sense. Surely the £1000's my Husband and I have spent in tax and NI should pay for a measley course of anti biotics for Tonsilitus? But no, £7 odd to get better!!

 

I am currently pregnant and believe me I'm going to milk it for what it's worth with my Maternity Exemption card. I have eczema so I'm going to get a massive supply of my bio oil, steriod cream, emolients etc and also get myself to the dentist for a check up, polish etc.

 

Get back what I've paid for with tax and NI for all these years as in 18 months time I'll be back to paying!!

 

I agree that OAP's/Children and people with long term medical illnesses should get free prescriptions. But I think everyone else should pay.

 

I have friends who work in pharmacy's and even they have said how disgusting it is that people from other countries come here for HIV/Hep C treatment as it's free. Doctors are giving out 6 months worth of treatment at a time which costs £10,000's because they are going 'back home' (which isn't in England) for the next 6 months. 6 months later they're back claiming they're living in Britain again to get another 6 months worth of treatment and then 'going back home' again.

 

This country is a joke.

 

 

I agree with you. Foreign people are milking our NHS totally.

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