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The rhino whip affair.

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The Rhino Whip Affair

 

When i read the thread title i was thinking this thread was about a local politican caught with his pants down in a seedy club.:hihi:

 

Thats next weeks headlines I Reckon :D

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Err didnt the chief constable resign or was forced to resign

 

I have the final bit somewhere I'll find it out, DCS Carnill and CI Wells retire, DCI Batty suspension lifted.

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When i saw the thread title i thought..... well ill not go into what i thought but lets just say i'm leaving it bitterly disappointed!!!

 

Come on explain yourself.

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Great ( or dirty) minds think alike :hihi:.

 

I think we were posting the same thoughts at the same time.:D

 

No mate.

Stop trying to claim my greatness.

It clearly states that you posted a full 2 minutes (thats120 seconds) AFTER me.

Now stop it.

You are embarrasing us both.

 

:hihi::hihi:

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Come on explain yourself.

 

Family forum mate. I cant :mad:

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TWO C.I.D CHIEFS TO RETIRE. Nov. 22.

The final chapter in the Sheffield rhino whip affair ended here tonight after an hour long meeting of the City's Watch Committee.

Two senior officers are to retire and an inspector has been reinstated.

In a statement after the meeting Councillor Major J. Sewell, chairman of the committee, said:-

"The Watch Committee have today been able to deal with the outstanding cases of Detective Chief Superintendent [George] Carnill, Chief Inspector Ivor Wells, and Chief Inspector Joseph Batty.

"As regards Chief Superintendent Carnill, as he has given notice of his intention to retire the committee have decided to terminate his suspension forthwith in order that the notice may be dealt with.

They have agreed that his retirement will take effect on completion of his service on Dec. 22, 1963, to which date he will be granted leave in accordance with his leave entitlement on full pay and allowances.

He will also be granted the pension to which he is entitled in accordance with the Police Pension Regulations.

"With respect to Chief Inspector Wells, he has submitted an application to retire on completion of service on Dec. 31 next.

To enable this application to be dealt with his suspension is terminated forthwith and he will retire on the date referred to and he will take leave in accordance with his entitlement to that date on full pay and allowances.

He will also be granted the pension to which he is entitled in accordance with the regulations.

"As regards Detective Chief Inspector Batty, the committee has terminated his suspension today so that he may return to the police service to carry out such duties as may be assigned to him by the Deputy Chief Constable."

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TWO C.I.D CHIEFS TO RETIRE. Nov. 22.

The final chapter in the Sheffield rhino whip affair ended here tonight after an hour long meeting of the City's Watch Committee.

Two senior officers are to retire and an inspector has been reinstated.

In a statement after the meeting Councillor Major J. Sewell, chairman of the committee, said:-

"The Watch Committee have today been able to deal with the outstanding cases of Detective Chief Superintendent [George] Carnall, Chief Inspector Ivor Wells, and Chief Inspector Joseph Batty.

"As regards Chief Superintendent Carnill, as he has given notice of his intention to retire the committee have decided to terminate his suspension forthwith in order that the notice may be dealt with.

They have agreed that his retirement will take effect on completion of his service on Dec. 22, 1963, to which date he will be granted leave in accordance with his leave entitlement on full pay and allowances.

He will also be granted the pension to which he is entitled in accordance with the Police Pension Regulations.

"With respect to Chief Inspector Wells, he has submitted an application to retire on completion of service on Dec. 31 next.

To enable this application to be dealt with his suspension is terminated forthwith and he will retire on the date referred to and he will take leave in accordance with his entitlement to that date on full pay and allowances.

He will also be granted the pension to which he is entitled in accordance with the regulations.

"As regards Detective Chief Inspector Batty, the committee has terminated his suspension today so that he may return to the police service to carry out such duties as may be assigned to him by the Deputy Chief Constable."

So every one lived happily ever after!

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So every one lived happily ever after!

 

Albert(good stonemason) and Ken didn't, both dead.

Here's another part of the story,

 

 

"DISMISSED DETECTIVES HAD MOTIVE FOR SMEAR"

________________

 

CLAIM THAT SENIORS CONNIVED AT BEATINGS, TRIBUNAL TOLD

 

Mr. Geoffrey Baker, appearing yesterday for the Sheffield Watch Committee at the opening of a tribunal in Sheffield to investigate the dismissal from the Sheffield police force of two detectives, said that the detectives deliberately resorted to sheer brutality in their efforts to extract confessions from three men in custody.

"I appreciate that those are strong terms", he said "I know the tribunal would not expect me to use expressions like that if there was not evidence to support them.

"There are photographs taken of the men and there is also the evidence of a consultant surgeon that all three men were subject to severe and repeated blows by instruments in the category of a cosh and a rhino whip."

 

FULL INVESTIGATION

 

The tribunal was set up by the Home Secretary under the Police (Appeals) Act to inquire into the appeals of Derek Edward Millicheap and Derek Leslie Streets.

Mr. G.R.Swanwick Q.C., presided and sat with Commander Willis an inspector of constabulary.

Mr. Dennis Lloyd appeared for Millicheap, and Streets conducted his own case.

An application by Mr.Kenneth Mitchell, a solicitor, to take part was refused, but Mr Swanwick told him that he could remain and observe and advise his clients.

Mr.Mitchell said he had recieved instructions to represent the Chief Constable, Mr. Eric Staines, Chief Superintendent Carnhill, ex-Detective Inspector Rowley, Chief-Inspector Wells, and Sergeant Hird.

Albert and Kenneth Hartley and Patrick Clifford Bowman, the men who had been in custody, were represented by Mr. Arthur Hewitt.

 

Mr. Swanwick said the tribunal would be conducted very much on the lines of an appeal at quarter sessions.

 

Mr. Baker said that the Watch Committee had confirmed the disciplinary decision of the Chief Constable, and submitted that the dismissals were justified.

In view of the seriousness of allegations made, the Watch Committee wanted the matter fully investigated.

The committee took a natural pride in their police force, but were conscious that the conduct of police officers must mirror the law they sought to uphold.

The law would rapidly become a farce if it's agents were to flout it themselves, as appeared to have occured to some extent in this case.

 

'PROPERLY ADMINISTERED'

It had been suggested that the two officers were not acting on their own initiative, and where there was even a whisper that inroads were being made into the liberty of the individual, voices should be raiised.

At the same time, the committee felt that the particular peccadilloes of one small group should not be enlarged into allegations of general misconduct on the whole of the police force.

"The police force as a whole is a body in which the Watch Committee have the highest confidence", he continued. The force was properly administered.

The two appellants had the strongest possible motives for indulging in a smear campaign against superior officers.

The allegations were limited to five men in the crime squad concerned, and the superior officers who gave them their terms of reference.

The conduct of those five, it was said, constituted the gravest misbehaviour on the part of the police force.

The appellants acts, on their own admissions, were grave enough, but it appeared that they caused to be put before the city magistrates a completely false mitigation.

Their explanation was that in the heat of the moment, and during a struggle and a show of violence by three prisoners, they acted with excessive zeal and used too much force in restoring order. On that basis the court ordered fines.

Mr. Baker then made his statement that in cold blood the appellants deliberately resorted to sheer brutality to extract confessions from the men in their custody.

 

'GREATER GRAVITY'

Streets went on, now alleged that ex-Detective-inspector Rowley was himself responsible for the false mitigation.

One appellant complained that the full facts were not known to the Chief Constable, but the Chief Constable would say that had those new facts been before him, his decision to dismiss the appellants would have been the same.

The only possible difference might have been that others would also have been dismissed besides them.

"The matter which makes the whole affair of greater gravity and importance is that it is now suggested by the appellants that senior officers instigated, witnessed, and conived at this deliberate beating of the prisoners", said Mr.Baker.

Of the five men concerned in the crime squad on the night of March 14 the appellants were dismissed and ex-Detective-inspector Rowley, Sergeant Hird, and Detective-constable Rowlands were all subsequently reprimanded by the Chief Constable on a rather limited charge.

The Chief Constable had consulted the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Sergeant Hird was put into uniform, which meant some pecuniary loss, and Rowley and Rowlands resigned.

Hird, Rowlands, and Rowley denied violence, and there was evidence that the use of force was iniitiated by and confined to the appellants.

There was no evidence to suggest that such force was ever indulged in by officers outside the crime squad.

It might be that the other three officers turned a blind eye to what the appellants were doing, but there was an important distinction between senior officers overlooking the use of force and encouraging or suggesting its use.

 

"COMPLETE DISTORTION'

The temporary crime squad was formed in March because crime was increased and detection had fallen. Chief Superintendant Carnhill justifiably felt that special measures were necessary.

There was nothing new in crime squads, but the appellants suggested that the special measures that had to be taken included the use of unorthodox and improper methods of detection.

They also said they were being encouraged to disregard the judges rules on the questioning of prisoners, and even to use force to extract confessions.

That was complete distortion of what the crime squad was told.

The squad had been addressed in general terms by Chief Superintendant Carnhill and Chief Inspector Wells.

After being served with summonses Millicheap said: "We must have been mad."

In court they pleaded Guilty but Streets was now saying that he never committed the asault on one man and had pleaded Guilty to an offence he did not commit.

No doubt it was impressed forcibly upon the crime squad that urgent steps had to be taken to combat the crime wave.

The appelants clearly interpreted that as an invitation to use force and unorthodox methods.

Evidence was given to the tribunal by the Hartleys and Bowman that they were beaten with coshes and a rhino whip and a surgeon said their injuries were consistent with moderate to severe force.

Kenneth Hartley, of Bellhouse Road, Sheffield, said that after Streets had used the whip on him, Streets said; "You can tell them in court we have authority from higher up."

The enquiry was adjourned until today.

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I'm amazed no one can remember how the story broke. I first read about it in the 'Star'.

It appears one of the Hartley bro's was released from custody following a night spent in West Bar Green being knocked about and being used as a whipping top. He hung around until the 'Star' offices opened their doors and then asked to see the chief. When eventually gaining his audience he proceeded to show the bruises and other wounds he'd sustained during his overnight stay with the police.

The story got into the national newspapers and eventually a parody of it on 'That Was The Week That Was'.

I remember a short time afterwards standing at the bar at the 'Locarno' talking to a guy called Ray Wetherall. A big lad, moustache, built like the well known 'brick sh******se. Another guy came up to the bar near us and Ray immediatly made his way over to him and engaged him in conversation. The second guy was one of the police who had been knocking the Hartleys around and Ray wanted to take him outside. It didn't happen, at least, not then.

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I'm amazed no one can remember how the story broke. I first read about it in the 'Star'.

It appears one of the Hartley bro's was released from custody following a night spent in West Bar Green being knocked about and being used as a whipping top. He hung around until the 'Star' offices opened their doors and then asked to see the chief. When eventually gaining his audience he proceeded to show the bruises and other wounds he'd sustained during his overnight stay with the police.

The story got into the national newspapers and eventually a parody of it on 'That Was The Week That Was'.

I remember a short time afterwards standing at the bar at the 'Locarno' talking to a guy called Ray Wetherall. A big lad, moustache, built like the well known 'brick sh******se. Another guy came up to the bar near us and Ray immediatly made his way over to him and engaged him in conversation. The second guy was one of the police who had been knocking the Hartleys around and Ray wanted to take him outside. It didn't happen, at least, not then.

Texas could that have been Ron Weatherall or is it another guy?

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Texas could that have been Ron Weatherall or is it another guy?
Yeah, it could've been Ron. I knew him from playing rugby at school and believe me he was a rough piece of work back then.

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