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Does anyone remember Mrs O'Hara from St Theresa's School?

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Does anyone remember Mrs O'hara from St Theresa's school?

 

Hello peewee 84,

 

Unfortunately, this post isn't gonna bring you any nearer to finding the whereabouts of Mrs O'hara - Scarlett to her friends. I didn't go to St Theresa's school, but I know of somebody who did. Michael [Mick] Hardcastle and his younger brother Kevin. After St Theresa's, they later went to Chaucer.

 

The Hardcastle's lived in the top block of maisonettes, at 64 Crossland Drive, Gleadless Townend. I often associated with Mick, as we played loads of togger in Hollinsend Park, and on the long field over Ridgeway Road at Kirkby View. We once went up to Sheffield University to watch Juicy Lucy perform in the early 70's. Shakin' Stevens and the Sunsets were the support band. Mick's favourites were Gary Puckett and the Union Gap. My favourites were Focus, and still are.

 

Mick also had other friends who were; Leslie, Leigh, Howard and a dark haired kid called Clarke. Mick had a girlfriend called Vivienne, but they fell out. It wasn't long afore he found a new bird, as usual. Her name was reight posh, Olivia, who lived in a house with a gable over the door. Mick had always had the desire to join the RAF, and his dream was to fly De Havilland planes. He was always on about 'em. Then one day, much to my surprise, he had gone with the wind, to start his basic training at RAF Swinderby, which isn't far from R[h]et[t]ford.

 

 

Best wishes to you peewee84.

 

Zakes.

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Mrs O'Hara is my aunt and I can happily inform you that she is well and very active. I will show her this thread and I have no doubt you will get a personal response

 

Hi there,

 

Did you ever show this to Mrs O'Hara? :) Glad to hear she is well and would be lovely to hear from her!

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Dose anyone Remember Sarah Johnson

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I remember Mrs O’Hara. She taught J3 when I was there and looked after the pets. 
Mrs Green was headteacher but just before I left it was Mr Nealis. 
Mrs Bell passed away she moved to another school to be headteacher I can remember Mrs Green going to her funeral. 
I left in 1988. My name was Emma Walford then. 
I remember Mrs Dyson, Miss French, Mrs Dolphin (dinner lady) Miss Denby (was never really sure what she did). 
my favourite teacher was Miss Waddington x

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On 20/05/2011 at 19:45, lazarus said:

Ive heard of her but I attended before her time, I remember Miss Camm,Miss Artindale, Miss Woodrow, Mrs Duffield, Miss Ruddy, Mr Price, Mrs Wood, Miss Watson, Miss Clifford and Mr Long

I remember them all except I remember Mrs Artindale not 'Miss'. "Good Morning Mrs Art - in-dale!"

 

I used to be chosen every year for 3 years to pick out the school Christmas raffle tickets.  Mr Long used to come into the infants classroom and always pick me. He'd take me by the hand to the big hall, stand me on a table in front of all the big older pupils and I had to put my hand in a bucket and pull out the tickets.  The second year he did it, when he walked in announcing what he was going to do, I shrank slightly under my desk...and he still came and picked me again! I couldn't believe he hadn't remembered that he'd picked me the year before. Well I was puny and cute with plaits. After the 3rd year I guess I didn't look so cute. LOL

 

I'd like to arrange a reunion of St Theresa's pupils, there from about 1959 to 1966. Get in touch if you want to too and we'll try to get it rolling!!!!!

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8 hours ago, Def Cougar said:

I remember them all except I remember Mrs Artindale not 'Miss'. "Good Morning Mrs Art - in-dale!"

 

I used to be chosen every year for 3 years to pick out the school Christmas raffle tickets.  Mr Long used to come into the infants classroom and always pick me. He'd take me by the hand to the big hall, stand me on a table in front of all the big older pupils and I had to put my hand in a bucket and pull out the tickets.  The second year he did it, when he walked in announcing what he was going to do, I shrank slightly under my desk...and he still came and picked me again! I couldn't believe he hadn't remembered that he'd picked me the year before. Well I was puny and cute with plaits. After the 3rd year I guess I didn't look so cute. LOL

 

I'd like to arrange a reunion of St Theresa's pupils, there from about 1959 to 1966. Get in touch if you want to too and we'll try to get it rolling!!!!!

I was there from 1950 to 1959, and it was MISS Artindale never MRS , I remember  all the teachers mentioned, I disliked The headteacher Miss Camm, she always had her favourites, my sister was picked on by her in the 1940s, so as soon as I reached 9 or 10 it was my turn, none of the teachers helped or encouraged me all the time I went through my “education ?” , I though I was stupid but later life I realised I could have done better things with a bit of nurturing by the teachers, don’t try and put the onus on me I was willing to learn but never asked why I wasn’t doing very well, I was a very quiet, shy pupil.

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Uh oh different memories of Mrs and Miss then. Hey Ho. Not surprising after all these years.

 

I agree on the treatment of pupils at schools in those days though. Unless a pupil was obviously "backward" by anyone's measure, when they put them in the special class, everyone else was treated the same, and if you didn't perform to their strict standards you were punished as lazy, idle, sloth-like by getting the cane, or a rubber thrown at you by the teacher.  (Or a slate in my mother's day! The tales she told me) There was no allowance made for dyslexia, nerves, spectrum disorder, (not invented then in common parlance) or high intelligence boredom behaviour. (My problem lol) Being the oldest in the class had its advantages and disadvantages. Classes were too large and widely aged and the youngest suffered to keep up.

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I remember Miss O'Neill, I think she was a Geordie but hid her accent very well. But it didn't escape me.  Remember it wasn't cool to have a regional accent then if you were a professional.  Her cheeks wobbled when she spoke or moved her head from side to side.

 

One day returning to the classroom from lunch or 'dinner' as we used to say, I happened to file in after two unconnected classmates .  They started larking about and chasing each other past the teacher's desk, on which lay Mrs O'Neill's spectacles.  One girl's cardigan flapped and caught the specs. Onto the floor they fell right at my feet.  I stopped so as not to tread on them on my way past. Just at that moment Miss O'Neill came back into the classroom , saw her specs on the floor at my feet, and I was sent off to Mr Long for the cane! despite my protests that it had been the other girl and nothing to do with me. Such was the rough justice in those days.  The other girl denied it of course.

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