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Water meter megathread

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I live in a modest 3 bedroomed house which is rated at level B for council tax purposes. So why is Yorkshire Water charging me an astronomical £460 for my water supply next year ? I have often read that the average water bill ( all water suppliers - not just Yorkshire Water ) is around £200 - £250 per annum so why do I have to pay so much ? My son left home last year so there are now only two adults. We don't use a dishwasher but do like to keep our garden well watered in the summer. So would it be worth considering changing to metered water ? Can any of you give me a rough idea what you pay annually if you are on a meter ? And what happens if a leak occurs from a pipe that is situated on your property ? Do you have to pay for the lost water ? I'm undecided so please help ! Many thanks to anyone who takes the time to reply. :confused:

Share it with your neighbours for a small fee :P

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If it works out more you can have it taken out.

 

No.

It will never be taken out.

 

You can revert back to a flat rate charge, but the meter will stay for the next occupants.

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We're on a water meter (through no choice of our own) and wind up running a 3 butt water system for the summer months, with only one of those collecting, and the other 2 decanted from that

 

maybe I should just cut down on the number of pots we have :huh: - then again, we use the rain water for cleaning the dog area too

 

I'd be interested in using harvested water for things like toilet flushing, but I've been led to believe that it's only economical to have installed if you're doing it on a newbuild

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We are in a similar house, have always been on a water meter since we came here and have never paid more than £50 per qtr.

 

You must change and try, if after a year it's more expensive you CAN revert back to the ratable system, what have you got to lose??

 

Coincidentally I have just phoned YW today to get my parents switched, rule of thumb as someone pointed out more bedrooms than occupants but we're 3/3 and still gain loads. DO IT!!!

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For any single people living in an upper story flat, try asking for a water meter. The answer should be no, but then you can ask for your charges to be assessed as if you did have a meter. I did this and achieved quite a reduction, so well worth trying.

 

Im now paying £33 per quarter on a water meter instaed of £36 per month :mad:

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Do it for sure. We had to have a water meter a few years ago because we moved into a new build. It cost far less than are previous house did, which had been done on the rateable value.

 

When we then moved into our current house I had it changed to a meter, and it at least halved the cost. Having said that, the cost this year has jumped up quite considerably -

 

But that can be explained by the not so long ago arrival of sprog number 2. So now the washing machine is on most days, along with daily bath for baby, shower/bath for 5 y.o. then at least 1 other shower each day for an adult.

 

By the sound of the origianl OP's reduced occupancy you'd be better off. Just make sure you save water (and therefore the planet!) by using water butts for the garden filled from the gutters. You can also put either 1 or 2 half litre plastic pop bottles filled with water into the cistern of each toilet in the house - think about the number of times it gets fluhsed in a year, that can add up to quite a saving!

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the pop bottle theory is outdated, since the great big old cisterns no longer exist in most houses - so the water saved by each flush is usually re-wasted by multiple flushes for solid waste

 

if you're concerned enough, replace the mechanism with a dual flush one :thumbsup:

 

the biggest modern water-waster is the power shower. We've all been indoctrinated to believe that showering is more efficient than bathing, but unless you can leap into and out of a power shower within 2 mins, you're probably wasting more water than a bath would

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When I moved a few years ago I was paying water rates until I discovered I had a water meter cleverly hidden next door.

You should see the cheque I get back for overpayment.

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For any single people living in an upper story flat, try asking for a water meter. The answer should be no, but then you can ask for your charges to be assessed as if you did have a meter. I did this and achieved quite a reduction, so well worth trying.

 

I'm in a first floor flat and have a meter - it's under the sink.

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Having a water meter fitted will save you money.

 

Chris

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I used to pay 10 monthly payments of £33 a month, I went to a meter 4 years ago and I paid £19 per month for 2 years and I now pay £17 per month...3 x bedroom house with 2 adults, same as you no dishwasher but i do water my garden frequently..

GO TO A meter NOW

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I presume everyone ha had their water bills through then? I was going to come a post a similar thing after after opening ours this morning.

 

I thought I was dear but it's nowhere near any of the £400 ones on here. Last year we paid £247, this year we are paying about £320. Why the big increase?

 

btw im with Severn Trent over here in S20.

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