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A Mash or a Brew?

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I haven't read the whole thread, but there might be a distinction between processing loose leaf tea and using teabags.

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i use ringtons gold tea bags,top class.builders tea,i am sure theres others as well,but its my prefered tea

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Most are blended, I prefer Redbush types as I like the taste and they are naturally free of caffeine.

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I suspect 'Builders' Tea' is a term now only  used by the Metropolitan Liberal Elite having read it somewhere in the Observer Supplement ! Our last builder asked for decaf and we gave him the same from ....Sainsbury's.

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The Complete Atlas of the British Isles. Reader's Digest (1965) has x2 pages devoted to Language and Dialects (pages 122/123). According to this publication Mash and Brew are common terms from the South Midlands to the Scottish Border. Other words for 'Mashing' tea include; Mask Tea - Scotland, Wet Tea - The West Country. Soak Tea - Cornwall. It also includes Make, Damp. Draw, Scald and Steep, but doesn't give any particular region for these differences.

 

Right, it's time to go and Mash!

 

Cheers, Wazzie Worrall.

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Let's all mash a cuppa.

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Yorkshire Tea use the term "Brew" when it's "mash" in Yorkshire, surely?!

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19 hours ago, HumbleNarrator said:

Yorkshire Tea use the term "Brew" when it's "mash" in Yorkshire, surely?!

Agree.  Mashin' a cuppa. 

 

If you also notice, Yorkshire Tea used to say, "Yorkshire Tea for Yorkshire water."    I could never work that one out, especially if you want to sell the tea around the UK, unless each box of tea bags comes with a free tanker full of Yorkshire water? 

 

Also the water in Sheffield, (soft water), makes better tasting tea than the water you get up in say, Scarborough, (hard water). 

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Not sure if we have soft, medium or hard water here in Northumberland but I get limescale in my kettle.  I think you get it if the water is hard.  Don’t think I got it when I lived in Sheffield so could that be because the water is soft?


I can’t remember hearing people using mash or brew very often when I lived in Sheffield.  When I’m visiting Sheffield now,  it’s would you like a tea or coffee?  

 

 

 

 

 

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As a young apprentice in the early 60s the first instruction before starting work was to get thisen a mashin can. This was an enamel jug type vessel with a  lid which doubled as a cup. I found these were used in many trades for the function of mashing ya tea. Brew is a Lancastrian invention and nothing to do with Sheffield so get mashin.

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Hi Broncolives.

 

I remember those white enamel 'mashin tin's', I had one when I worked at Darnell Shotbasting and British Steel in the early 70's. Is there anywhere than sells them now, I'd love to own one?

 

Best wishes,

 

Wazzie Worrall

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