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The 'Verb': "To OF"

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Originally posted by Tony Ruscoe

Except language changes all the time and these have now become words in their own right.

 

As for the "nite" thing... I use it sometimes. I'm not lazy. I'm not thick. I can spell too. Sometimes I just want to use it like that. Who says it's spelt "night" anyway? "Jail" used to be spelt "gaol" until we became more Americanized (sic). I bet hardly any kids would spell it "gaol" now...

 

I know I rant about the apostrophe being in the wrong place, but that's because it changes the meaning of a sentence. A phone is a 'phone is a telephone. A 'plane is a plane is an aeroplace. Dropping those apostrophes (or should that be "apostrophi"!?!) doesn't change the meaning. Neither does spelling night "nite"...

 

Well, that's what I think.

Phanerothyme's post was a joke apparently.

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Ah, now Americanizationalism of language - that's a differentist kettle of fish. New words inventedized, and word innovationisms by appenderizing "-ize", "-ism", "-ization", "-alism" and so on, to existing words.

 

Especially in the corporate/business world - words are ized, ismed and Americanizationalized all the time.

 

Fascinating stuff really, anthropological linguistics.

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Originally posted by Hodge

Ah, now Americanizationalism of language - that's a differentist kettle of fish. New words inventedized, and word innovationisms by appenderizing "-ize", "-ism", "-ization", "-alism" and so on, to existing words.

 

Especially in the corporate/business world - words are ized, ismed and Americanizationalized all the time.

 

Fascinating stuff really, anthropological linguistics.

 

Actually I believe the 'ize' ending is 'original' English. The Americans kept that and we changed to 'ise'...and now were changing back again...

 

If your interested in words and such this is a good site:

 

http://www.worldwidewords.org/index.htm

 

Nomme

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Originally posted by nommedenet

Actually I believe the 'ize' ending is 'original' English. The Americans kept that and we changed to 'ise'...and now were changing back again...

 

If your interested in words and such this is a good site:

 

http://www.worldwidewords.org/index.htm

 

Nomme

 

Cool, cheers mate - I'll have a look at that later :)

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Originally posted by nommedenet

Actually I believe the 'ize' ending is 'original' English. The Americans kept that and we changed to 'ise'...and now were changing back again...

 

If your interested in words and such this is a good site:

 

http://www.worldwidewords.org/index.htm

 

Nomme

 

Ooh now that is a top site - added to my hotlist.

 

Thanks for that one nomme, although I note he hasn't included chthonic on there yet, something of an omission IMO.

 

Originally posted by Sidla

Phanerothyme's post was a joke apparently.

Hehe, glad to see the bypass operation was a success Sidla

:P

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Originally posted by Foxxx

Fair enough, but I can understand what people mean when they say could of instead could have! or bored of etc :) same as yorkshire dialect were instead of was and many other regional dialects. I can't see how that can be misinterpreted!

 

It is bad enough when people SAY "could of", but at least they can use the excuse that they were abbreviating "could have" to "could've" and their accent dictated that the "'ve" would be pronounced "of" (however unlikely this is). When people WRITE "could of" however, it is even worse, as they are showing how bad their grammar and grasp of the English language really is.

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Originally posted by Agent Dan

Um... 'whilst' is a word... meaning 'whereas' or 'at the same time as'... It's in the dictionary and everything!!:confused:

You were absolutely right.

Whilst studying for a degree at an American college I was told by a teacher not to use the word "whilst" as it was not a real word. She made me think it was slang???? At the time I did not have a computer so I didn't have the technology to research into it. I took her word for it. So after now going to the online dictionary I found that the word is chiefly a British word, but apparently not used by Americans. So since 1995 I thought my teacher was right, I never questioned it. I might just get my old papers out and send them to her and say SEE!!!!!

Thanks Agent Dan.

Funke88

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Originally posted by nommedenet

If your interested in words and such this is a good site:

 

http://www.worldwidewords.org/index.htm

 

 

I went to the site - it is really good. I subscribed to the email list and got an automatic email asking where I heard of the site so I sent them the link to this thread.

 

So, if Mr WorldWideWords is reading, hello!

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I've just remembered that what really bugs me is when people say / spell "are" instead of "our"!

 

Unbelievable, I know - but it was quite common with the kids I went to school with. (Perhaps because their accept made them pronounce them both in the same way though.)

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terrible accident at level crossing in Yorkshire - sign said 'do not cross while light is red'

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Originally posted by t020

One of my pet hates is people who incorrectly use the word "of" as though it is a verb, in the place of "have". There is no verb "to of", its "to have". Therefore you don't say or write "I should of" or "I could of", you say or write "I should have" or "I could have". Granted, these can be abbreviated to "could've" and "should've" but are still not pronounced "of". I have heard numerous people on TV incorrectly using English in this way, and quite often in the written form too. So if you or anyone you know does this, please learn: There is no verb; "to of".

 

get a life:loopy:

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Originally posted by fittdiva

get a life:loopy:

Get an education... :loopy:

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