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There is a North/South divide in Sheffield. Shame on us!

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....when were talking about the likes of Totley, Dore, Millhouses those kind of areas i cant say there would be many refugees living there....

 

Tax refugees, maybe?:hihi:only joking!

 

On a more serious note, though, your point about the language barrier in some communities is a good one. I think it could be a tremendous positive getting all ethnic groups in a community to work together on a gardening project, or whatever.

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I'm interested in numbers 1 & 2 of your list - here's why:

1) One of the complaints from the less deprived/more affluent areas is that they can't access funding for community projects as they don't meet the criteria (its targeted at areas of deprivation), and

2) There are more people who are unemployed in the less affluent areas especially where there are large concentrations of social housing. Wouldn't you agree they would have plenty of spare time?

 

If I may be permitted to reply to your post Ms Macbeth.....(also in reverse order)

 

2) Large concentrations of unemployed people doesn't imply that they are available for community projects where they live. But even if there were willing volunteers, play equipment doesn't come cheap and has to be funded.

 

1) As a city councillor, I represent areas of high deprivation.

 

I am very proud of the improvements that have been achieved on the Gleadless Common Open Space, and pay tribute to the dedicated band of local residents who helped advise and shape the development. It cost a lot of dosh. This money came from a housing redevelopment scheme though.

 

I am also very proud of the Norfolk Heritage Park. This is a beautiful (and listed) park, with fine views of the city, a well maintained adventure playground, sports facilities, a cafe at the Centre in the Park (and might I just take this opportunity to recommend the daffodil walk in the Spring!). There is a dedicated band of the Friends of Norfolk Heritage Park, who can apply for funds which the council cannot access, e.g., lottery grants. This, incidentally, also applies to any Friends of a Park Group, including those in the more affluent parts of the city.

 

I am though ashamed that the kids of Arbourthorne have not one single item of play equipment. I've been directing small pots of money into a fund to buy equipment, but it's still small fry at the moment.

 

The government recently gave Sheffield several million pounds to specifically fund play equipment in deprived areas. Arbourthorne met the relevant criteria, and I raised my hopes that at last we'd get some play equipment for the local kids.

 

I learned instead that some of the money was going elsewhere, including improvements to Millhouses Park (where there is a skate park). At a council meeting I pleaded with the Cabinet Member to at least let the children of Arbourthorne have a little bit of this money for a slide or a swing for them to play on. The Cabinet Member refused my plea, and said Arbourthorne children could go and play on Manor estate or Norfolk Park.

 

So, it's not always the case that deprived areas of the city gets money for parks and recreation grounds, as my experience testifies.

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Maybe anything installed in parks in the "North" will be vandalized to buggery, hence they don't bother.

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If I may be permitted to reply to your post Ms Macbeth.....(also in reverse order)

 

2) Large concentrations of unemployed people doesn't imply that they are available for community projects where they live. But even if there were willing volunteers, play equipment doesn't come cheap and has to be funded.

 

1) As a city councillor, I represent areas of high deprivation.

 

I am very proud of the improvements that have been achieved on the Gleadless Common Open Space, and pay tribute to the dedicated band of local residents who helped advise and shape the development. It cost a lot of dosh. This money came from a housing redevelopment scheme though.

 

I am also very proud of the Norfolk Heritage Park. This is a beautiful (and listed) park, with fine views of the city, a well maintained adventure playground, sports facilities, a cafe at the Centre in the Park (and might I just take this opportunity to recommend the daffodil walk in the Spring!). There is a dedicated band of the Friends of Norfolk Heritage Park, who can apply for funds which the council cannot access, e.g., lottery grants. This, incidentally, also applies to any Friends of a Park Group, including those in the more affluent parts of the city.

 

I am though ashamed that the kids of Arbourthorne have not one single item of play equipment. I've been directing small pots of money into a fund to buy equipment, but it's still small fry at the moment.

 

The government recently gave Sheffield several million pounds to specifically fund play equipment in deprived areas. Arbourthorne met the relevant criteria, and I raised my hopes that at last we'd get some play equipment for the local kids.

 

I learned instead that some of the money was going elsewhere, including improvements to Millhouses Park (where there is a skate park). At a council meeting I pleaded with the Cabinet Member to at least let the children of Arbourthorne have a little bit of this money for a slide or a swing for them to play on. The Cabinet Member refused my plea, and said Arbourthorne children could go and play on Manor estate or Norfolk Park.

 

So, it's not always the case that deprived areas of the city gets money for parks and recreation grounds, as my experience testifies.

 

Hello RR, I was sort of playing devil's advocate in response to an earlier statement where it was suggested that people in better off areas had more time and access to more public funding. I'm involved on a voluntary basis with people from tenants' and residents' associations (TARAs) across the city so I'm very aware that personal commitment and enthusiasm has little to do with how affluent or deprived an area is. It can take just a few enthusiastic people to galvanise others into getting involved - and groups often start when there are problems to be tackled.

 

I can't comment on Arbourthorne park, I know nothing about it - but from what you say I understand why you'd want to see improvements there - perhaps it needs a 'friends of' group?

Edited by Ms Macbeth

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Britain in Bloom is down to local business and residents!!!! There's nothing stopping Gleadless Valley and Fir Vale from being involved, other that a lack of interest and motivation.

 

OK, I havent read the following pages yet, and somebody may have already said it, but Page Hall residents a few years back decided to try entering In Bloom and won the silver gilt award in Sheffield and a neighbourhood certificate of merit award at Britain in Bloom. There was a double page spread in the star on it, I remember that!

And Firth Park enters every year I think - as do many of the less afluent areas of town.

 

ETA the Page Hall in bloom project was entirely led by the community, and got people from all backgrounds involved. The kids play park thingy up at Firth Park looks pretty good (OK, I am not a kid and I haven't been up-close, but it looks good when you walk past) and there was somewhere else froma poorer area, not sure which one, where local residents managed to raise the money for a kids play park thingy.

 

So I think the argument that people in poorer areas can't be bothered or lack community spirit is erroneous

Edited by nerd

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Community involvement is a big reason. Have a look at the minutes of the various council area panels, which are available on the council website. The south west panel often has four of five different community groups in attendance, whilst some other areas often have none. Many of the good things that the 'nicer' areas have are down to very effective lobbying from involved and organised members of the community. Also, Millhouses park gets additional money from community organised fund raising events.
Thats the main difference! some people get on and make it happen,others just moan and expect it to happen

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Maybe anything installed in parks in the "North" will be vandalized to buggery, hence they don't bother.

 

If people live in a well cared for area, they will treat it with respect.

 

Put them in a s***hole, and they will treat it like one!

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****holes don't just happen by themselves, people make ****holes.

 

"Funded by local residents" is the problem, isn't it ? I don't mean that people shouldn't do it if they want to, but that they shouldn't have to. Decent play areas are surely something we would want to be funded out of council tax (or is that too socialist for Fulwood?).

 

It is born of a realisation that there is only so much money to go around. So as IreneWild mentioned, some residents get off their bum and do it for themselves rather than moaning about not having the facilities.

 

Any divide is only a state of mind. You can choose your state of mind. There are some fine examples of community action in ALL areas of the city if you look properly. There are people that moan (but don't do anything) about injustice everywhere too.

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]****holes don't just happen by themselves' date=' people make ****holes.[/b']

 

 

 

It is born of a realisation that there is only so much money to go around. So as IreneWild mentioned, some residents get off their bum and do it for themselves rather than moaning about not having the facilities.

 

Any divide is only a state of mind. You can choose your state of mind. There are some fine examples of community action in ALL areas of the city if you look properly. There are people that moan (but don't do anything) about injustice everywhere too.

 

Nice areas don't just happen by themselves, money makes them nice.

 

If the money ceased, you would soon see these nice areas turn into holes!

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Nice people make nice areas, money or not.

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Nice people make nice areas, money or not.

 

So you are now saying that there is a divide! Nice people live in nice areas, bad people in bad areas, or is that just the state of your mind?

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