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There is a North/South divide in Sheffield. Shame on us!

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Viney40, Britain in Bloom entrants are drawn from the regional winners, as a matter of fact Beighton won the Yorkshire in Bloom competition overall and represented the county for the last Britain in Bloom.

 

It's not about money but about participation. Similarly with parks which have friends groups, Hillsborough Park has one and they work hard to bring things to the park, Middlewood Park was redeveloped at a cost of over £350,000 in conjunction with local people (also in the north) There is a new friends of Spider Park group in Wisewood who will be working with the local council and others to fund raise and develop a masterplan for that park.

 

The north of sheffield has had alot of work done on local parks, the difference being that unfortunatley in some areas the local people don't look after the equipment and it is vandalised and damaged. Perhaps this doesn't happen to play areas in the South of the city?

 

edit: libertarian - Beighton didn't have any financial help of any significance and it was achieved with a small dedicated group of volunteers :)

 

Like I just said before, the north of the city has had alot of investment and environmental improvements are almost always community led.

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Britain in Bloom is down to local business and residents!!!! There's nothing stopping Gleadless Valley and Fir Vale from being involved, other that a lack of interest and motivation.

 

Oops!

 

Sounds like a typically Southern reply to me. Correct me if I'm wrong.

 

The North have a "lack of interest and motivation"! Glad that they are your words and not mine! :o

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Of course 'the north' does, but as per my previous comment it is at a maor disadvantage when trying to do it. And yes I agree finance IS an issue (see above)

 

I had already seen your above, I was, and still am with you all the way.:thumbsup:

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Is Walkley in your "North" or your "South" ?

 

I think it's considered a "nice" place to live (well I like it), but it's not exactly "fancy", and the people in the pubs are "proper" Sheffielders (not me. I've only been here thirty years - I don't count yet).

 

Judging from the response from the people in the pubs, I would place Walkley firmly in "my" North. After thirty years, The locals clearly view you as one of "my" Southerners.

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I know this was tongue in cheek, but, NO... Certainly that is a gross over simplification and in many cases downright wrong. It is a multi part issue. Some of which are:

 

1) Certain areas are more affluent so fundraising is more likely to succeed

2) Some areas have more active neighbourhood committees/ committees with more time on their hands (due to being middle class and the second earner not being 'required', thereby (usually) 'she' has more time to devote). I'm sure that many of those in other areas would love to be in a position to devote as much time. It just isnt possible though.

3) Some areas have a worse anti social behaviour problem.

 

Unfortunately 1) and 3) nearly always correllate and 2) often does.

 

Whereupon the council/ voluntary bodies etc have the option of installing something nice in an area where it will be looked after/ matching funding is available.... or not. Which do they chose? The easy option all too often.

 

What is the solution? Sort out the underlying problems but as i said before I'm not holding my breath.

 

I'm interested in numbers 1 & 2 of your list - here's why:

1) One of the complaints from the less deprived/more affluent areas is that they can't access funding for community projects as they don't meet the criteria (its targeted at areas of deprivation), and

2) There are more people who are unemployed in the less affluent areas especially where there are large concentrations of social housing. Wouldn't you agree they would have plenty of spare time?

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I'm interested in numbers 1 & 2 of your list - here's why:

1) One of the complaints from the less deprived/more affluent areas is that they can't access funding for community projects as they don't meet the criteria (its targeted at areas of deprivation), and

2) There are more people who are unemployed in the less affluent areas especially where there are large concentrations of social housing. Wouldn't you agree they would have plenty of spare time?

 

Hmmm... I'm going to answer your points in reverse order.

 

2) True... I guess it is a twofold issue. Time and committment. This is (almost certainly) a gross stereotype, but how 'committed' are the unemployed? Some (a few?) definitely will be and they must be applauded... the others? I honestly don't know... I would like to think that they would be willing to give up their time for their community... unfortunately in my (albeit limited... and yes I have a little) experience here they aren't. (Yes that is a stereotype, and much of their attitude is down to other peoples attitudes, so it cuts both ways... As I hope I've sugested, I think there really needs to be a BIG sea change to deal with the underlying problems... and that probably starts with a MASSIVE cash injection which government/ the people won't/ can't afford...)

 

1) About all I can guess (and it is only a guess) is that these groups know how to work the system, and that it depends on the funding source. Also they have the time (and importantly contacts) to work the system... It is after all often 'who you know'...

 

These are only guesses...

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So it seems this divide is actually between parts of the city where residents get organised and work hard to make good things happen, and parts where they sit on their sofas and complain about how unfair everything is. Shame on them!

 

So there are parts of the city where all residents work hard, and there are parts of the city where all residents sit on their sofas all day!

 

Shame on you!

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Britain in Bloom is down to local business and residents!!!! There's nothing stopping Gleadless Valley and Fir Vale from being involved, other that a lack of interest and motivation.

 

Hahahah, Gleadless Valley has it's own 'in bloom' competition run by the tenants association, and, funnily enough, the chairman's wife wins it every year................:suspect:

 

Maybe that's why the competition has seen entries dwindling.......

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I have, but not by my own choice.

 

I have noticed that over the past five years or so, that there is a huge distinction. On my travels I have seen the likes of Dore and Fullwood entering the Britain in Bloom competition. I can't say the same for Fir Vale or Gleadless Valley! Why not? Surely tax payer’s money is equally distributed around the city!?

 

Ahem, might I draw your attention to Firth Park?

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Well the further north you go it gets nearer to Barnsley whereas if you head south and make it through the refugee buffer zone of Lowedges/Batemoor you reach North Derbyshire (AKA Sanctuary).:hihi:

 

Head North and end up in Rotherham, now THEY really know how to do parks there. Have you seen Clifton Park:love::love::love::love::love:

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Community involvement is a big reason. Have a look at the minutes of the various council area panels, which are available on the council website. The south west panel often has four of five different community groups in attendance, whilst some other areas often have none. Many of the good things that the 'nicer' areas have are down to very effective lobbying from involved and organised members of the community. Also, Millhouses park gets additional money from community organised fund raising events.

 

Yes, Chris, community involvement IS a big reason. Lobbying seems to be most effective when it's undertaken by the most affluent, who know who to write to, (and probably play golf with them) and just what to say, and have more leisure time and cash available to inject in to their projects, hence, Graves Park did not get carved up and sold off last year, in fact the lobbying was so successful that it even sent our local Labour Party into oblivion. However, the poorer areas haven't got the resources, the contacts, and aren't given the nod, which would seem to fit in with a private golf course or something appearing in one of the city's park in the north. (This was something I read on another thread and is hearsay, but I'm sure someone will shed some light on that.)

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So it seems this divide is actually between parts of the city where residents get organised and work hard to make good things happen, and parts where they sit on their sofas and complain about how unfair everything is. Shame on them!

 

See my previous post, I don't think it's quite as simple as that.

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