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Does anybody have any memories of Hadfield's.

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I was given a guided tour of Hadfield's steelworks just before the Steelworkers' Strike. I remember the lady who took me around the mill had "L" and "R" on either of her Wellington boots; just so she'd "know which feet to put them on!"

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My grandad and my dad used to work at Hadfields. My parents also used to be steward & stewardess at Hadfields Sports & Social club on Olivers Mount.

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I was given a guided tour of Hadfield's steelworks just before the Steelworkers' Strike. I remember the lady who took me around the mill had "L" and "R" on either of her Wellington boots; just so she'd "know which feet to put them on!"

Igot a job at hatfields first year of the war turning a face on shell adapters at a half-penny each , I had just left a job at 10 bob aweek, Idid 140 the first day and was over the moon till the end of the week Iwas sick to death with boredom and left.

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Yeah my grandad who has passed away now worked there for years, he always used to talk about it.

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I used to work with a bloke called John Clarke who had worked at Hadfields up to them closing, he was a turner and did maintenance as well. The firm I worked for used to go and repair the rolls at Hadfields, we metalsprayed the bearing areas which had either worn away or when some dippy beggar had machined new one's undersize.

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I used to work with a bloke called John Clarke who had worked at Hadfields up to them closing, he was a turner and did maintenance as well. The firm I worked for used to go and repair the rolls at Hadfields, we metalsprayed the bearing areas which had either been worn away or some dippy beggar had machined new one's undersize.

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My Uncle George worked most of his working life at Hadfields. I recall he was proud they had made the Diamond Crossing just outside Newcastle Station. The Phoenix still stands defiantly on Sheffield Road opposite where Edgar Allens used to be !

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My late father used to be the Chief Chemist at Hadfields and was there for most of his working life. In my earlier career, I worked at Edgar Allen's Non-Destructive Testing Department (Radiography etc. of steel) just opposite Hadfields in Vulcan Road.

My father remembered the days when Sir Robert Hadfield came to work by horse! Sir Robert was interested in the effect of rare metals such as gold, silver etc. on the corrosion resistance of steels, and with this in view he borrowed steel samples from a box from the basement of the Royal Institution in London, these samples had been produced by Michael Faraday (who had the similar idea). My father had to analyse these for Sir Robert, and he took him to lunch in London at the Cafe Royal, as a reward. He also analysed coffin nails to help develop corrosion resistant materials, and church door hinges to help develop ideas for fatigue resistant alloys.

When I was about eight or nine years old (late 1940's) my father took me around the East Hecla laboratories and I remember seeing a turbine blade being fractured by subjecting it to sound waves! (produced from an old organ pipe which had been specially modified for the purpose.)

Edited by ABWEALTD

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some of my relatives worked at the Hadfields ammunitions factory in ww11 My Grandma Fanny Hague and her brother Harry Haycock and my Granddad Charles hulley worked in no 5 shop. My father James[ Jim] Hulley was a carpenter on maintainace

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Hadfield is a small residential town in High Peak, Derby-shire, England. This is a very old and renowned place and an ancient destination for the tourists as well.

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