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Do companies have a legal responsibility for staff in bad weather

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To be fair, it will be dark (or at least with substantially reduced visibility) by 16:00. When it gets dark, the temperature will drop further, the already-compacted snow will turn to ice and it will be much more tricky to move about. Especially if you suffer from any kind of mobility issue. So 13:00 add 1.5 hours or so may not be such a daft time to set off if the poster feels they "have" to be home before dark.

Personally, I'm going to sit in the pub and wait for it to thaw out before setting home ;)

 

you're gonna be absolutly rat-arsed then..lol good lad

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There are definitely requirements outside that. Bar staff, if having to work late so they miss their transport are legally required to be offered some method of getting home other than walking. A taxi or a lift being the normal options. I don't know if that really applies in the snow though.

 

ive just a quick google search and couldn't find anything about this being a legal requirement, im not saying your wrong, but if you have a link to somewhere that would be great as i know someone that works in a bar that would be very interested in this.

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Spare a thought for the tradespeople, they have to get to work or they don't get paid! No luxury of having a days paid holiday or sick leave!

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I think the ethic should be that if you want to leave work early in these situations then bosses should let you take holiday, use flexi if appropriate or just don't expect to get paid. Surely no boss can actually force you to stay at work?!!!??? x

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I work for possibly the worst company ever, (I won't mention the name, but I will say Richard Hammond and Take That are on the payroll :P), so it really doesn't surprise me that they kept staff at work til closing. They were the only shop in the area where I live that DIDN'T close when Sheffield FLOODED last year!

 

But yes, if the world was just, companies would have a legal responsibility to their staff.

 

But it isn't, so they don't.

 

Ive worked for Morrisons, and trust me their are many worst firms around ive worked for a few that get slated Carcraft and Stagecoach, money is all some companies care about, at least you got an xmas prezzie off your employer! :)

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Spare a thought for the tradespeople, they have to get to work or they don't get paid! No luxury of having a days paid holiday or sick leave!

 

You get a small fortune Viney, i was a plasterers mate once upto a time and he was raking it in only 4 years ago, maybe abit slower now tho, but yes self-employed has its pros and cons.

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"5 miles = approx 1hr walk (OK more like 1.5hrs in this weather)

Why on Earth do you need to set off at 1pm "to get home before dark"?

 

 

12mins per mile in snow you must be a well seasoned long distance walker.

I think 2.5 to 3 is a more reasonable estimate.

For those who have had to walk it would be interesting to know how far and how long.

In summertime I occasionally walk a little less than seven miles to work and thats just short of a couple of hours (get a lift home though )

 

 

I walked about 4 miles today along the A57 (Aston to Mosborough) in the snow, and it took me about 1 hour 45 mins.... was trying not to slip and fall over all the time.

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You get a small fortune Viney, i was a plasterers mate once upto a time and he was raking it in only 4 years ago, maybe abit slower now tho, but yes self-employed has its pros and cons.

 

You get a small nowt if you can't get to work my friend!

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Getting back to the original question employers have a duty of care towards their employees. In practical terms they have to look after them and ensure that they come to no harm whilst in their care. This can extend to making sure that they get home safely if by being at work the journey home becomes dangerous. Therefore by insisting that employees stay in the office they become liable for ensuring that they get home okay.

 

Are you sure that this is correct? An employer has no control over where the employee lives or how the employee travels to work, so how can he be responsible for the employee's safety during the journeys to and from work?

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I heard a story about an accident on a bus. Bus ran into a sign. Nobody said or did anything (apart from the driver reporting it).

There were 3 claims for whiplash injuries.

It was a CCTV bus, all 3 people didn't even appear to notice the small impact, but all 3 claims came through the same solicitors.

Anyway, they all backed down after being show the video of them not reacting or even noticing the impact. But without that video....

 

It would be better if the they were charged with fraud, or if the insurance company started sueing them for fraud - if that is possible. A few well publicised court cases might help reduce false claims.

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There are definitely requirements outside that. Bar staff, if having to work late so they miss their transport are legally required to be offered some method of getting home other than walking. A taxi or a lift being the normal options. I don't know if that really applies in the snow though.

 

That's right, You don't know! Why not post when you do know? Give the OP something tangible.

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