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Anyone worked at Firth Browns?

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Hiya,

Does anyone, remember the "Bolt from the Blue" that was the headlines in the Star, while my dad was working at FB a bolt fell x-amount of feet, from the roof, it hit him (Albert Hall) on the forhead, he ended up with stitches...and made headlines in the Star,.......Kathy Hall

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Title

Firth Brown A Sheffield Steel Company.

 

Author

Catherine Hamilton

 

I saw it on the bookshelves today.

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Just as a matter of interest it was 20years ago last Wednesday (May 26th 1984) that the last cast of steel was made at Firth Browns, I wonder how many thousands of tons were made on the Savile Street site

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my dad worked there in 60s- frank worthington

and my uncle norman antcliffe.

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My maternal grandfather, Arthur Monks, worked at Firth Browns/ Brown-baileys, during the 20's, to the fifties/sixties (he was born in 1900 approx, depending on whether you believe the birth-date he gave on joining up to the army in ww1 oe his birth certificate)

 

My mother's brother, Frank Monks, worked at the same place, until his death in 1973, in a lorry-crash.

 

My father, Brian Turner, worked for Shardlows (near Arthur Lees at the bottom of wincobank) until the mid 1960's.

 

Mr PT's father worked for Forgemasters , (Albert Howson) (and, funnily enough, the *first* mr PT was also involved in steelworking, he worked in the offices at Dunford-Hadfields, which was where the Mad-as-hell Shopping-centre is now.

 

PT

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My mother worked in the offices there in the twentys.Her name was Jean Fogg.

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I know a gentleman called 'Barry Smith' who used to work at Firth Browns.

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Originally posted by Bill

I worked at Firth Browns from 1937 to 1983 (with a gap of 7 years for the second world war). During my time I worked in the machine shops. I would be very happy to here from anyone else that worked at Firth Browns at the same time as me. My father and grandfather also worked at firths.

 

Look forward to hearing from any and all of my ex-colleagues.

 

Bill Howard

 

Hi Bill,

My father worked at Firth Browns years ago, as a sawsmith,

his name is Ronald Turfitt, not sure what dates he worked there.

Also another family member did, his name was Leslie Shakeshaft, also not sure what year he worked there either.

Do you happen to remember them?

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My dad used to work at Firth Brown's in the late 50s and the early 60s.I believe he was a steel examiner at the time.His name was Albert Deakin

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Guest bostonaire

my grandfather worked at "Dunford Hadfields" is this the same place?

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I wonder how many steel ingots we have shifted when I worked there and the tonage that we have moved I worked on the internal railway at firth browns for about 6 years good job in the summer but not so good in the winter especially in the snow and the freezing tempretures, the night shift was the best shift to work even on 12 hours you could at least get out for a beer in between doing the shunts either in the melting shop or in the heavy forge what was the best part of the job having to wait for a forged crank shaft it could take anything up to 2 hours to be finnished hence ale time have maybe 3 pints then off to the heat treatment and on our way back to the cabin get the underhand shunter to call in the chippie and fetch the supper in for the other shunters and boss man.Oh happy days I once went down to have a look at were I use to work hard to believe that a railway system use to go right through firth browns and now where that business park is that there use to be the melting shops and heavy forge, rolling mills heat treatments machine shops, sidings for the scrap wagons.

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I once saw steel workers pouring molten metal from a high balcony into iron moulds below, from huge cauldrens

It was dark and the scene was silloetted against the sky. It looked like a scene from Hell. A train was slowly moving along as each was filled and the steel workers were bending and stretching all in black apart from the golden/red metal which streamed down like a waterfall. I was mesmerised.

 

Hazel

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