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If the Conservatives win the election how high will unemployment rise?

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This has been interesting me for a while: if getting rid of lots of public sector jobs is good, doesn't that mean unemployment is good? And if so, why would we want to see more jobs in the private sector? All jobs have to be paid for, either through taxation (public sector) or through buying goods or services (private sector). If we don't have the money to pay for jobs through taxation, how can we have the money to pay for jobs through buying things?

 

And if we get rid of around 250,000 - 500,000 public sector jobs, isn't that going to shrink the private sector, because you'll have a lot of people with no spending power anymore, so the market for goods and services will diminish?

 

Because the productive (private) sector of the economy is efficient and drives costs down, the unproducive (public) sector is paid for by the private sector - through the natural market forces. They occur everywhere in the world, even in socialist states where they try to stamp on people in the private sector. There needs to be some public sector - but nothing like as muchas we have now.

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... If we don't have the money to pay for jobs through taxation, how can we have the money to pay for jobs through buying things?

 

And if we get rid of around 250,000 - 500,000 public sector jobs, isn't that going to shrink the private sector, because you'll have a lot of people with no spending power anymore, so the market for goods and services will diminish?

 

If you make things and sell them (even export them [novel idea]) you make money. If the manufacturer makes money he can pay money (tax) to the government (as well as paying employees, who also pay tax to the government) and the government can use the money it receives to pay people to provide services (the public sector.) Then those people can buy things.

 

This government has been telling people to 'spend their way out of the recession' (by borrowing money and increasing their personal indebtedness) and borrows money to pay people who work in the public sector (providing those services which the community desires and needs) because there are too few people actually producing wealth (making things or growing things) to provide funds for the government.

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If you make things and sell them (even export them [novel idea]) you make money. If the manufacturer makes money he can pay money (tax) to the government (as well as paying employees, who also pay tax to the government) and the government can use the money it receives to pay people to provide services (the public sector.) Then those people can buy things.

 

 

And they mainly buy them from other parts of the private sector - supermarkets, insurance companies, department stores, the local pub - taxation mainly keeps money flowing within the system and is pretty efficient way of organising things. Too many people think government taxation / spending has made money disappear rather than keeping it in circulation.

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There will be an increase in unemployment after the election - Gordy has wrecked the economy and made many people dependent on the state. We need to cut back a little on these non-jobs in the public sector. We need to help the private sector grow. It is SO SO SO important we get a Conservative Government to help the country back on its feet for the short, medium and long term.

 

We need both a thriving public sector and a thriving private sector, the latter which funds the public sector. But with the Tories promising the cuts as quickly as they are doing will put both at risk and put us into a Japan style deflationary cycle.

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the more people that lose their jobs may be a wake up call to rid this country of all the illegals and bogus students and asylum seekers...and the eu migrants might head back to eastern europe and we can all live happily ever after...and not wake up to some stinking vietnamese cannabis factory....

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We need to help the private sector grow. It is SO SO SO important we get a Conservative Government to help the country back on its feet for the short, medium and long term.

 

It looks like the opinion poll's have got it so so so wrong then :roll: , a workable coalition is the way forward as we have had enough of a two party system, its time for change and the Libs need to clip the wings of which ever party they end up sharing power with.

 

'power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely'
Edited by Grandad.Malky

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If you make things and sell them (even export them [novel idea]) you make money. If the manufacturer makes money he can pay money (tax) to the government (as well as paying employees, who also pay tax to the government) and the government can use the money it receives to pay people to provide services (the public sector.) Then those people can buy things.

 

This government has been telling people to 'spend their way out of the recession' (by borrowing money and increasing their personal indebtedness) and borrows money to pay people who work in the public sector (providing those services which the community desires and needs) because there are too few people actually producing wealth (making things or growing things) to provide funds for the government.

 

Isn't part of the problem that, left to their own devices, company execs and shareholders keep so much of the money generated by making and selling things, and keeping it (rather than spending it) in accounts hidden from their government's tax collectors, that this money doesn't find its way into the system?

 

And if more people were producing things, the price of those things would come down wouldn't it? Which would mean you wouldn't actually create any more wealth. A big fat contradiction built into capitalism.

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With the Tories consistently above Labour in the opinion polls, given what has happened previously to employment levels when the economy was in recession, and there was a change of government and with the Tories promising huge public spending cuts.Just how high will unemployment rise?
What you should be asking is how high will borrowing rise if Brown is still in his nest box on thursday!Britains been living off the tick for years............don,t you get it! Edited by mossdog

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They will bring us massive cuts in public spending, tax breaks for the rich...top rate of tax, inheritance tax, corporation tax ......a fiscal policy that will make the pips squeak for the poor.

 

Unemployment already rising will get higher but the chances of claiming benefit will of course be curtailed. At the same time, they will personally blame you for being unemployed and up that stigma level to the max

 

They will cut back at all times social benefits and make it harder to claim disability. You nasty wheelchair people etc will just have to try harder and suffer more

 

They will cut back on the civil service but create more private quangos with no local or national accountability.

 

They will accelerate privatisation of health care and tell us we cannot keep throwing money at the problem. Parts of the service, free of charge will go and be replaced by insurance schemes or bled dry of funds that will force people to go private. They will give big tax breaks to people who take up private insurance.

 

I predict a free fall economy within a year of them taking office...but we will be told it is harsh but necessary medicine

 

If you have a mortgage...better protect now, if you have the chance of getting a fixed rate mortgage:hihi:. Interest rates will double within a year and with the credit crunch, repossessions will hit an all time high. They will of course blame you for living beyond your means, although they were the party that originally promoted house ownership in the eighties.

 

They will be vague on Europe...booing and hissing on the sidelines...signing up to economic packages and backsliding on the social contract side. We will stagnate in relation to Europe ...they still cannot get their heads round Europe. We will not join the Euro under a Tory Govt. Save the pound anyone?

 

They will of course, like Labour follow the Americans blindly in Afghanistan, where of course we will continue to get our arses kicked.

 

They will give more economic freedom to individual schools in order to discriminate and create further social barriers in education. They will periodically bash teachers and blame them for all societies ills. They will of course change massive amounts of the curriculum unecessarily and chicken out from changing A levels. They will starve higher ed of funds and there will be massive rises in student fees.

 

Periodically, they will target minority groups and doubt their loyalty to the country. They will attack single parents and teenage mothers and of course blame them for all socities ills. They will persists with the idea that society began to disintegrate due to the 1960-s. They will detain more asylum seekers but pursue the same previous policy because they realise that a non unionised and cheap workforce is good for their economy.

 

They will increase the pay of the police and pay nurses, teachers and the fireservice less. Funny...the Tories hate the fireservice. They will give more draconian powers to the police as have labour and there will be riots but it will be the fault of the -enemy within-

 

..but inflation will fall

 

I wish Labour had a different policy but alas no

 

Posted 28th Sept 2009.......'We've only just begun.........'

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It is almost satirically funny, the way that the coalition is allowed to get away with the charge that our problems are all down to 13 years of Labour misrule. And it never ceases to amaze and amuse me that David Cameron and George Osborne opposed every stage of Labour's rescue of the system.

 

Alas, I fear that Osborne is potentially the most dangerous chancellor of my lifetime. I am not saying that it is all going to end in tears. It may be that in five years the economy will be thriving and there will be those who maintain that it was worth all the pain. But I have my doubts; and it seems to me that the sacrifices being asked en route are not only socially and economically risky but largely unnecessary, not to say counterproductive – literally, counterproductive.

 

It is not too much of an exaggeration to say that a bankers' ramp has provided an old-fashioned rightwing coalition with a pretext for a frontal assault on a welfare state that may have its deficiencies, but is better than the alternative. The popular prints are very good at generalising from particular instances of abuses to the system and concluding that "everyone on welfare is a scrounger". Similarly, the chancellor, who seems to have a bee in his bonnet about housing benefit, risks aggravating an already serious housing crisis with a scattergun approach to isolated abuses of the system.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/oct/24/william-keegan-osborne-most-dangerous-chancellor

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half a million public sectors jobs for a start feel free to add anymore :huh:

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half a million public sectors jobs for a start feel free to add anymore :huh:

 

I'll raise you half a million more public sector jobs and add on half a million private sector jobs that depend on public spending.

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