Jump to content RIP Sheffield Admin Mort

'Minimum priced' alcohol policy- should there be a 'maximum price,' too?

Recommended Posts

Scotland is to become the first country in Europe to set a minimum price for alcohol - raising the prospect that England could follow suit.

 

England is NEXT!!!

 

But, if there's going to be a minimum, then, why not a maximum, too?

 

The reason, because i went to a place, where they were charging a whopping £3.20 for a pint of lager.

 

Now that is utter daylight robbery, but as we live in a free world, if we set a minimum price on an item, then we surely ought to set a maximum, too!

 

The Government shouldn't be allowed to do it one way without the other.

 

What do you think?

Edited by Joe9T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I can brew my own for 16-20p per pint ;)

 

I'm starting to drink a lot less though nowadays, and I much prefer to smoke.

 

The minimum price is likely to affect both dysfunctional and functional alcoholics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think that they did something like this in the old soviet union they put a maximum amount on what was to be paid for all sorts of items including vodka,

me personally i think it should be left to the shops to deciede what they charge and this way whoever is the cheapest gets the businesshttp://www.cipe.org/blog/?p=387

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scotland is to become the first country in Europe to set a minimum price for alcohol - raising the prospect that England could follow suit.

 

But, if there's going to be a minimum, then, why not a maximum, too?

 

The reason, because i went to a place, where they were charging a whopping £3.20 for a pint of lager.

 

Now that is utter daylight robbery, but as we live in a free world, if we set a minimum price on an item, then we surely ought to set a maximum, too!

 

The Government shouldn't be allowed to do it one way without the other.

 

What do you think?

 

I think that you're being silly.

 

The minimum will be of the order that stops alcohol being sold at a loss, so it'll be something like 40p/unit, meaning a supermarket can't sell a can of beer for 20p, but has to charge 60p.

 

Price per unit for rare single malts can be up in the hundreds of pounds, and the same for expensive old wines and champagnes.

If you set a maximum price then the distilleries will close and the wine producers will all switch to making lambrini. Which doesn't make anyone a winner.

 

The argument for a minimum price is to curb excessive drinking (I don't agree with this by the way), and to stop teens buying it so readily.

There's no good argument for a maximum price at all, except that you'd like to be charged less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last few years of primary school, me and a few mates would drink at at each others houses, we would be drinking 2% lager (and only a little), which was bought for us by our parents to consume with them, in front of them, at 10pm we were sent upstairs as the tv programmes wouldn't be suitable.

When I was drinking in my early teens (13-15) I used to buy duty free vodka and duty free cigarettes.

At 16 I could get served in shops and pubs.

At 18 I would go to pubs/parties, and I have done since, although less pubs + clubs since the smoking ban.

 

A minimum price would have had little effect on my underage drinking, maybe the bootleggers would make more profit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think that you're being silly.

 

The minimum will be of the order that stops alcohol being sold at a loss, so it'll be something like 40p/unit, meaning a supermarket can't sell a can of beer for 20p, but has to charge 60p.

 

Price per unit for rare single malts can be up in the hundreds of pounds, and the same for expensive old wines and champagnes.

If you set a maximum price then the distilleries will close and the wine producers will all switch to making lambrini. Which doesn't make anyone a winner.

 

The argument for a minimum price is to curb excessive drinking (I don't agree with this by the way), and to stop teens buying it so readily.

There's no good argument for a maximum price at all, except that you'd like to be charged less.

 

"The argument for a minimum price is to curb excessive drinking"

 

Well, i think that that is a smoke screen by the Government.

What is REALLY happening is that people are NOT drinking out in the pubs etc and instead drinking at home, because it is far cheaper to do so.

And on top of that, smokers can smoke and drink indoors, where it is nice and warm.

 

My argument is that if you set a minimum, which i do not believe in, in a democracy, then, you HAVE to set a maximum too.

If not, then we lose what should be 'free' market and become communistic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another stealth tax? Also, I wonder whether the "alcohol-free beers" will be any cheaper?

Edited by carosio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"The argument for a minimum price is to curb excessive drinking"

 

Well, i think that that is a smoke screen by the Government.

What is REALLY happening is that people are NOT drinking out in the pubs etc and instead drinking at home, because it is far cheaper to do so.

And on top of that, smokers can smoke and drink indoors, where it is nice and warm.

 

My argument is that if you set a minimum, which i do not believe in, in a democracy, then, you HAVE to set a maximum too.

If not, then we lose what should be 'free' market and become communistic!

 

I did say that I didn't agree with the premise for a minimum.

 

You aren't presenting any argument for a maximum though, it just sounds like a winge about expensive beer.

 

Lots of things are regulated by our laws, but I've never seen a suggestion that anything with a minimum should also have a maximum and I can think of lots of counter examples.

 

Age for consenting to have sex.

Age for gettting married

Most age related things actually.

Minimum wage

Minimum sick pay, maternity pay, well, lots of pay things really.

Minimum health and safety standards.

Minimum skill requirements to hold licenses (ie to fly, to driver, etc)

 

Minimums are often put in place to protect either the vulnerable or society in general, sometimes maximums are put in place as well (speeds for example), but there's no intrinsic link between the two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Another stealth tax? Also, I wonder whether the "alcohol-free beers" will be any cheaper?

 

A tax that will go to shop keepers. Can you call that a tax?

And, why should it have any effect on alcohol free drinks, shops still want to make a profit, they aren't charities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason, because i went to a place, where they were charging a whopping £3.20 for a pint of lager.

 

If nobody buys it at £3.20 a pint, they won't charge that much for very long...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A tax that will go to shop keepers. Can you call that a tax?

And, why should it have any effect on alcohol free drinks, shops still want to make a profit, they aren't charities.

 

Alcohol taxes go to the government, and are proportionate to the retail price (and the strength); the alcohol free types presumably wont increase should the proposed minimum pricing be implemented.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they do get away with it though and people do buy it so i cant see how this minimum price drink thing will work to be honest because its still going to be bought if its cheap or expensive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.