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Lodgemoor Hospital - polio treatment centre?

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Thank you again denboy5 for bringing some of my memories back to me. I remember being taught how to make the beds with the very neat hospital corners at the bottom ... and also the pillows always had to be placed with the open end away from the entrance of the ward. I still practice the same procedures to this day. I also wash my hands very regularly as we were taught to do then. I wish I could turn back the clock and relive some of my times as a student nurse then.

The uniforms then were so lovely. I had a long cape that would keep any Eskimo warm in Winter. Nurses would just wrap the capes around their bodies and it would feel like an electric blanket. When I left Lodge Moor Hospital the uniforms were just being changed to disposable wear. What a shame. The older uniforms were so clean and the aprons crisp and white. I loved the short sleeved cuffs and the caps we had to wear. I feel so sad when I think how things have changed.

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... Iron lungs are still very much in use today in the LANE Fox unit and in the Papworth Hospital

 

I think you will find that Iron Lungs are only used nowadays in very special cases. Most ventilation in healthcare is done using modern external ventilators which are extremely advanced. Some are small enough to be fitted to wheelchairs and into shoulder bags.

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Thank you again denboy5 for bringing some of my memories back to me. I remember being taught how to make the beds with the very neat hospital corners at the bottom ... and also the pillows always had to be placed with the open end away from the entrance of the ward. I still practice the same procedures to this day. I also wash my hands very regularly as we were taught to do then. I wish I could turn back the clock and relive some of my times as a student nurse then.

The uniforms then were so lovely. I had a long cape that would keep any Eskimo warm in Winter. Nurses would just wrap the capes around their bodies and it would feel like an electric blanket. When I left Lodge Moor Hospital the uniforms were just being changed to disposable wear. What a shame. The older uniforms were so clean and the aprons crisp and white. I loved the short sleeved cuffs and the caps we had to wear. I feel so sad when I think how things have changed.

Hello once again, Nurse20

Well, I hope the memories I brought back to you, refreshed your working days, I was laughing to myself about the capes the nurses wore, one particular incident was when a nurse, on night duty, was telling us a ghost story, we was awake most of the night looking around the ward thinking who, or if what would appear from the dim night lights that were on the wards, when, suddenly, out of the sluice area of the ward, something shuffled along, knee high, with a hood, and cape, we found out later, it was a nurse, on her knees, such a terrifying moment, but, a memory that is ever imprinted on my mind, would it happen today, would it be allowed due to health and safety?

 

I don't think so.

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Replying to Nurse20, I too wish I could turn back the clock and go back to some of the great times my best friend and I shared at Lodge Moor Hospital. We worked hard. Remember the 10 - 12 and 2-4 shifts we worked, where you went on at 8am and finished at 8pm, and had either of those two hour breaks off in between!! Whilst we worked hard, we also played hard, and we share some wonderful memories of the great times we had!! We had some narrow escapes, when we were maybe somewhere we shouldn't be, but never broke any major rules! I remember so many good friends and good times from those days, but wish, just once, those times could be revisited.

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Hi, is your father Mike Kelly the athlete in the paraplegic games? If it is, I was in King Edwards with him in the 1950, would love to know how he is.

Denboy5

 

Hi denboy5

My father was mike Kelly the athlete who competed in many of the Paralympic Games around the world and at the stoke mandaville games. When I was born in 1977 he soon retired from competitive sport but went onto charity work setting up his own charity called push for life, which he raised money for chronically sick and disabled children. He sadly passed away in January 2010 at a grande age of 65. He did sufferer through life with numerous ailments, but always faced life with a smile and a joke and never let on the struggle he lived. My mother who was a nurse at king Edwards who nursed him back in the day and then went on to marry him is a forum member under the name patsyfagin. Hope this helps and I would like to hear your stories of my dad.

Thanks rich

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Hello Rich,

Thanks for the post on your father, I was in King Edwards with you dad, we had many happy times in there, as we were all long stay patients.

I was saddened to hear of his passing, I did quite a few games with him up at Lodge Moor Hospital, he was a fine athlete and, never let his condition get him down.

The last time I saw him was, outside the Sheffield Town Hall, sometime in the 1980's, as I spent lots of time on the Barkers Pool taxi rank, as, that was my job, he did say to come to his house for a, cuppa, if ever I was passing, I may have got this wrong, but wasn't it, somewhere around Wincobank area, Jacob Close, or Way? Long time ago, memory does not seem to register.

Anyway, thanks for the memory.

Best regards.

Denboy5

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Hello Rich,

Thanks for the post on your father, I was in King Edwards with you dad, we had many happy times in there, as we were all long stay patients.

I was saddened to hear of his passing, I did quite a few games with him up at Lodge Moor Hospital, he was a fine athlete and, never let his condition get him down.

The last time I saw him was, outside the Sheffield Town Hall, sometime in the 1980's, as I spent lots of time on the Barkers Pool taxi rank, as, that was my job, he did say to come to his house for a, cuppa, if ever I was passing, I may have got this wrong, but wasn't it, somewhere around Wincobank area, Jacob Close, or Way? Long time ago, memory does not seem to register.

Anyway, thanks for the memory.

Best regards.

Denboy5

 

 

Yes we live at Jacobs drive until around 1987 then we moved over to the crystal peaks area. He was a very proud person and never let his disability get in his way. I know he was my father and I'm very proud to say he gave us an excellent and solid upbringing. And it was a great loss for us all. Please don't hesitate to get in touch as it would be good to know more about his younger years

Take care rich

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I was in Lodgemoor Hospital for 16 weeks back in 1950 or was it 1951 when I was about 4 years old. I`d got para-typhoid, whatever that is and they put me in one of those isolation rooms surrounded by glass walls and my mom and dad when they visited me lobbed my presents through a skylight window.

If I remember right, a neighbour had been digging his garden and had sieved some soil into a pyramid shaped heap. It looked such a nice brown colour I ate some of it. Then I came out in big red bloches. Mind you, it might have been when we were poking sticks down the grate by the side of the road and playing with the black sticky stuff that stuck to the end of it.

 

I`m 67 now and feeling much better!

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I was in Lodge Moor hospital with scarlet fever aged 6. That was in 1957. I remember a lovely nurse brushing my hair every day and singing Scarlet Ribbons to me.

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I was in LMH 1966/67 for 15 months, as I  had dived in the sea and broken my kneck. I was one of the first patients to be helicoptered in (a yellow RAF Westland Whirlwind) I discovered the Ward with iron lungs on it, by chance when I was able to wheel around the hospital freely, and became friends with Dennis. On the South Ward I was in, Mr Crownshaw, was our Charge Nurse, Dr Hardy was 'top bod'. According to his deputy, I should have died years ago, thankfully he was wrong. I could not have wished for a better hospital, and staff. I went to the closing 'ceremony' of it. Believe it or not, I am still in touch with my original physiotherapist, and another member of staff, who helped get me through such a traumatic time in my young life.

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On 12/02/2019 at 00:35, PEAKUNDER said:

I was in LMH 1966/67 for 15 months, as I  had dived in the sea and broken my kneck. I was one of the first patients to be helicoptered in (a yellow RAF Westland Whirlwind) I discovered the Ward with iron lungs on it, by chance when I was able to wheel around the hospital freely, and became friends with Dennis. On the South Ward I was in, Mr Crownshaw, was our Charge Nurse, Dr Hardy was 'top bod'. According to his deputy, I should have died years ago, thankfully he was wrong. I could not have wished for a better hospital, and staff. I went to the closing 'ceremony' of it. Believe it or not, I am still in touch with my original physiotherapist, and another member of staff, who helped get me through such a traumatic time in my young life.

How old were you when you had your accident , if you don’t mind me asking .

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