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Hillsborough Shops Of The Past

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Kelseys was the pork shop on the end of taplin road ... 

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13 hours ago, Deborah a said:

Kelseys was the pork shop on the end of taplin road ... 

Yes, I well remember Kelsey's pork shop. Here is what I wrote about Kelsey's on another thread:

  Kelsey's was an excellent shop on the corner of Taplin Road. The Kelsey family came originally from Lincolnshire and were of good, solid farming stock. Harold Kelsey (a tall chap, always cheerful and energetic with "the gift of the gab") took over the shop that his uncle, Winter Kelsey - that really was his name - had run since about 1920. Harold retired and passed the shop on to his nephew, who didn't seem to have a good head for business and the shop sadly went downhill. Harold died aged 78 in 1982.

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Ray Banks had a branch of his Roadrunner records for a few years on Holme Lane if i remember correctly.

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The sweet shop on Dixon Road was Hawksworths. Mrs Hawksworth lived there with her son. After she died the shop closed but he still lived upstairs for many years. Iy now looks derelict.  When I was a kid (1962) my mother used to send me to Hemmings on Marcliffe Road (near junction with Wadsley Lane) for a pound of best butter from a barrel and a quarter of loose leaf tea.  There use to be a drapers at the bottom of Wadsley Lane, opposite the Park Hotel. There was a fruit shop next to it where my grandma worked and she always got stung by wasps in late summer when the plums were in season.

 

as a child I also went to Dr Rosenfield on Langsett Road - he always gave me Dolly Mixtures. We then moved to Dr Baker on the corner of Marlcliffe and Far Lane. His son committed suicide and then he and his wife died in the Tenerife aircrash. He was a lovely man.  On Middlewood Road, just round the corner from Wadsley Lane, there was a record shop. I bought a copy of the Rolling Stones "Let's Spend the Night Together" there in the mid sixties.

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Posted (edited)

Hi incywincy - it's nice to have your recollections. I remember Mrs Mary Hawksworth's shop - my brother knew her son David; they were the same age. Hemmines' shop on the corner of Marlcliffe Road remained open after the lease on their Holme Lane shop ran out in 1972, and it was still a general store until recently.  Dr Percy Baker was a lovely man as you say; it was so sad for his two daughters - first losing their brother Mark so tragically, and then their parents dying in the Dan-Air Tenerife crash in 1980. The drapers at the bottom of Wadsley Lane was Mrs Florence Houlston's and the fruit shop was Butcher's - they also had branches in Middlewood Road and elsewhere. Memories!

Edited by hillsbro

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Next to  Hawksworths there used to be a baker's shop. My mum used to buy me a mini Hovis loaf from there and some potted meat. She used to have a Sally Lunn!

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Hi incywincy - Oh, Sally Lunns - delicious! I had forgotten the baker's shop but you're quite right - it was Collier's. Here is a scan from the 1959 Kelly's Directory.

https://i.postimg.cc/3NF6xB0S/B.jpg

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I remember the wool shop now. My mother used to buy her wool there and my grandmother used to visit the hairdressers. There was a corner shop at the top of Warner Road and my grandmother used to send me there for large potatoes to make chips!

 

 

 

 

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The recordshop  on Middlewood Rd was Fred Erics. Just past the Park Cinema 

Bought an Eric Delaey record there. I Was bit of  Drum fanstic at the time

 

 

 

 

 

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Ooh yes - I remember being sent to Hemming's shop at the end of Marlcliffe Road when I was a young child in the mid-to-late 60's. Their "unique selling point" in those days is that they were open when most "normal"  grocery shops were closed - like on Sundays, or until about 7 or 8pm in the evenings. My mum always hated them, because she said they exploited people by making them pay vastly inflated prices for things she'd run out of when the "normal" shops were closed. She only ever sent us there occasionally, when she'd run out of bread, milk, or summat equally vital - and she always bitterly resented the prices they charged! I recall that they had really high counters - you had to reach above your head to pay them and pick up your purchases - but maybe I'm exaggerating that. because I was a small kid at the time.

 

I also remember being sent to the Brightside & Carbrook  Co-Op on Dykes Hall Rd. It was situated between the top of Far Lane and the top of Wynyard Rd.  The old B&C premises are a betting shop and a  takeaway sandwich shop now, but in the 60's. it was the "go to" local shop for everyone on the local Sutton Estate that surrounded it. My mum would send me along there with her shopping list - and her Co-Op "share number" written on the bottom - telling me that I must quote the share number  - on pain of death, if I forgot! It was "counter service" only. You handed your shopping list to the shop assistants  -  a couple of white-coated, middle aged women, who fulfilled your order nd brought it to the counter. However,  stuff like butter, cheese and bacon was hand-cut from huge slabs behind the counter - so if you wanted to buy anything  that was cut from a slab- like a chunk of cheese, a pat of butter or a slice or two of bacon, the white-coated women would call for the store manager - a pompous middle-aged bloke in a brown jacket - like Arkwright out of "Open all Hours" - would emerge from the back room and fulfil your order, like he was doing you a massive favour!

 

Quite why the women shop assistants weren't allowed to dispense slabs of butter, chunks of cheese or slices of bacon, I'm not sure. Maybe menopausal middle-aged women were not to be trusted with dangerous weapons....like butter pats, cheese wires....or bacon knives! 

:hihi:

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Hi FIRETHORN1 - nice to have your recollections. Hemmines could be a bit pricey but as you say they were "open all hours" - well, almost - and I suppose had to pay their staff a bit more for Sundays etc. The Brightside & Carbrook Co-Op on Dykes Hall Road was always busy and I also used to go there a lot on shopping errands. I'd forgotten the pompous manager who sliced the bacon etc. but I can still remember my mum's "divi" number - 5887! Eventually the share accounts with dividend numbers were phased out and trading stamps introduced - remember them?! See here -

https://i.postimg.cc/gj4485Zx/Divi-stamps.jpg

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the co-op used to come round and get my mum's order then deliver it.  They gave her a blue book with carbon paper so that she had a copy and so did they. She once went mad because she'd ordered cirio tinned tomatoes and they brought another brand!

 

 

 

 

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