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Plumbers: Radiator Bleeding Problem

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I'm a little stumped over how to bleed a radiator in a friend's house. His radiator, which is cold at the top but hot at the bottom, has a bleed valve at the bottom. When I loosen it, a healthy spurt of warm water shoots out. How am I meant to empty the air which I presume has gathered at the top of the radiator?

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It has the bleed valve at the BOTTOM of the radiator? :confused:

 

You sure there isn't one at the top anywhere?

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Are you absolutely sure that there isn't another bleed valve hidden around the back of the radiator at the top with a plastic cap on it? I have fitted radiators in my house from wickes which have this feature.

 

If not, it sounds like someone has fitted the radiator incorrectly. And if it were me I'd take it off and fit it the right way around.

 

But I am not a plumber, just a very handy engineer. Maybe a real plumber has a better idea

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A bleed valve at the back? Hmm, never thought to look actually, there may well be one. But yes, this one is at the bottom with the thermostat at the other side - the top two ends are just blank metal caps. I'll nip over and check the back of the radiator tonight. Thanks for the suggestions.

 

edit: all of the radiators in the house (council property) are of the same design.

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Originally posted by Ant

But yes, this one is at the bottom with the thermostat at the other side - the top two ends are just blank metal caps. I'll nip over and check the back of the radiator tonight. Thanks for the suggestions.

 

That doesn't sound like a bleed point, it sounds more like a drain hole to empty the radiator.

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If it is a sealed system then you can't bleed the system. If there is no header tank which would be located hopefully several feet above the height of the highest radiator in the house then stop letting water out because the system will just be emptying of water and so making the situation worse A sealed system can be topped up by putting water in from a tap usually near the boiler but it is a bit of a pain forcing all the air out of the radiators..

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It sounds like a sealed system then - there's certainly no bleed point behind the radiator. I'll pass the problem over to someone who knows what they're doing.

 

Thanks everyone.

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Keep us posted Ant. You've got us interested now ;)

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Sorted.

 

There was a 4mm plastic cap that sat flush in the bleed point cavity that made it look just like a round flat decorative feature in the centre of the screw-in nut. Basically we had to smash the thing off with a screwdriver.

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Glad you got it sorted.

 

Incidentally, did you know that a 'small' radiator key is known as "a little bleeder"? Oh, and one of these that is especially designed to adjust valves on the opposite side of the radiator is known as "a right little bleeder".

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Originally posted by WallBuilder

If it is a sealed system then you can't bleed the system. If there is no header tank which would be located hopefully several feet above the height of the highest radiator in the house then stop letting water out because the system will just be emptying of water and so making the situation worse A sealed system can be topped up by putting water in from a tap usually near the boiler but it is a bit of a pain forcing all the air out of the radiators..

Of course you can bleed a sealed system in exactly the same way as you would with a traditional tank fed system. Sealed systems are mainly found nowadays on combi boiler systems, but the air still has to be removed in order to fill it with water ( laws of physics and all that). The only difference is that you have to top it up manually, with water from the main inlet via the filling loop,( a length of flexible pipe usually located near the boiler). When the system is full and all radiators bled, the pressure as seen on the pressure gauge on the front of the boiler should read approx. 1-1.5 Bar. Job done.

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Guest Pauly
Originally posted by Sam Miguel

Incidentally, did you know that a 'small' radiator key is known as "a little bleeder"? Oh, and one of these that is especially designed to adjust valves on the opposite side of the radiator is known as "a right little bleeder".

 

:lol: :lol: Lovin it. :D

 

Incidentally if you weren't able to find a bleed valve (some of the newer council heating systems have their bleed valves removed so that tenants can't mess with them) then you could always carefully take a wrench to one of the upper metal caps and loosen it a little until you hear air coming out. Then all you have to do is quickly tighten it when water starts dripping out. Careful how much you open it though as you really don't want it to come all the way off. :nono: Might be an idea to put a cloth underneath as well because that water can get pretty dirty. :gag:

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