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New Build Flat prices- are they having a laugh?

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At those prices you'd have to be really desperate to live in the city centre for some reason.

It's a no brainer for most people to look a bit further out and get far far more for the money.

 

So on that basis I'd be very surprised if they sell at those prices.

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And when you consider all the internal walls are plasterboard and the pipe work mainly plastic and prone to leaking its even more obsurd.

 

Give me a solid built house any day

 

You plainly have no idea what you are spouting off about.

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a lot of the major building companies are selling off there land reserves and laying staff off even as we speak... one major company laid 70 off last month .. hence the rise in trades logging on the forum .. (just my opinion)

 

we are in for a long slog i am afraid. i would say to anyone save and not spend at the min. see in 6 months how the market is....

 

i would also agree the BTL will still boom as more people are failing getting a mortgage and are being pushed into lets short term.

 

Would you care to name a few. We have heard of only one company up the shoot and they owe a lot of money not just to us but to 20 other companies.

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You plainly have no idea what you are spouting off about.

 

.

 

I meant new build flats in general I didn't mean the at wicker

 

They may be built different

 

but i'll be very surprised if the internal walls of the flats arn't plasterboard

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OK, let's deal with the two points that you raised, sorry if I was a bit tetchy before :)

 

Plasterboard walls: Most internal partitions are now formed from studwork for various reasons. Firstly it is much more sound and heat efficient than masonry. It is fast, it is light and it is cheap because it is fast and light. It is in every way every bit as good as masonry - it is just different. In fact studwork is now also used for external walls - it's that good.

 

Plastic pipework: Everyone has their choices but there is nothing wrong with PVC / pu pipework. Again it is fast and light but one of the main advantages is that the newer stuff comes on a roll (like cable) and actually has less joints, therefore less chance of failure. Heat welded joints should be every bit as good if not better than copper.

 

 

I do have sympathy with why you think what you do, but I also think that you just need to get yourself up to date with modern building techniques. Perception counts for a lot and perhaps the industry should do more to get the general public up to speed to allay what should be unfounded fears.

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OK, let's deal with the two points that you raised, sorry if I was a bit tetchy before :)

 

Plasterboard walls: Most internal partitions are now formed from studwork for various reasons. Firstly it is much more sound and heat efficient than masonry. It is fast, it is light and it is cheap because it is fast and light. It is in every way every bit as good as masonry - it is just different. In fact studwork is now also used for external walls - it's that good.

 

Plastic pipework: Everyone has their choices but there is nothing wrong with PVC / pu pipework. Again it is fast and light but one of the main advantages is that the newer stuff comes on a roll (like cable) and actually has less joints, therefore less chance of failure. Heat welded joints should be every bit as good if not better than copper.

 

 

I do have sympathy with why you think what you do, but I also think that you just need to get yourself up to date with modern building techniques. Perception counts for a lot and perhaps the industry should do more to get the general public up to speed to allay what should be unfounded fears.

 

My perception was regarding the apartments in the OP

 

I work on sites day in day out.

 

I worked on west one flats for 2 years

 

clarence dock in leeds for 1 year

 

My knowledge of modern building techniques IS up to date

 

 

My personal opinion was that on the flats i've been on the parts done in plastic piping had more leaks than the parts done in copper.

 

As for the walls my opinion is the acoustic side is poorer ( for example in student apartments where the bedrooms lay side by side) and tend to damage easier.

 

I've never doubted the cost is cheaper, i'd just rather pay 220k for a house with brick internal walls and copper piping than the cheap easy suspect alternatives used nowadays

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You're not up to date if you are quoting those schemes :)

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Would you care to name a few. We have heard of only one company up the shoot and they owe a lot of money not just to us but to 20 other companies.

 

Persimmon?

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7364302.stm

 

...."the firm said housing market activity had "deteriorated" significantly in the past three weeks as mortgages became scarcer and consumer confidence fell..."

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Persimmon?

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7364302.stm

 

...."the firm said housing market activity had "deteriorated" significantly in the past three weeks as mortgages became scarcer and consumer confidence fell..."

 

This doesnt mean they are laying people off though does it.

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You're not up to date if you are quoting those schemes :)

 

But surely thats not to say that a lot of houses built recently with stud/partition walls feel considerably less solid than houses with masonry internal walls. It's a feeling not a science that the poster was relating to.

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But surely thats not to say that a lot of houses built recently with stud/partition walls feel considerably less solid than houses with masonry internal walls. It's a feeling not a science that the poster was relating to.

 

Most houses have some timber partition walls anyway. Older houses are all brick but more modern (1930's onwards) have both.

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