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Pierrepoint shop that time forgot.

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The hangman was definitely called Pierrepoint... by the way, the film is on DVD and it's very good and in parts very sad. I bought if from Ebay for £5

 

I love the film with Timothy Spall in the lead role but, the book is much better, in fact it's excellent.

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I'd call that an entry.

 

I also agree with ENTRY or PASSAGE (from Grimesthorpe)

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There has been a shop stood empty on Attercliffe road for as long as Ican remember.I have always noticed it because of the name Pierrepoint.

I think it used to sell fruit and veg through a market style front and must have been closed at least 50 years.

It is just as if the shutters were pulled down and totally left as it was all those years ago.

Iwould love to know more about it.It is on the left side leaving town somewhere below the old Banners on the opposite side of the road.

 

I remember this shop in the late 40s and in later years when it closed it was a thriving business. It was said the closure was via the council, area due for re-development. We should see some thing next year then oh oh oh.

 

The RBS bank is next door and is well worth a visit. Inside the architecture in my view is fantastic.

Alan

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I'd call that an entry.

 

I also agree with ENTRY or PASSAGE (from Grimesthorpe)

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I also agree with ENTRY or PASSAGE (from Grimesthorpe)
Well, I'm with you there. An ENTRY or a PASSAGE allows covered access to back yards and gardens. A GENNEL is a public right of way for pedestrians between streets etc. As for the multifarious names for a GENNEL - here's what I wrote on an old thread:

 

There are lots of other walkways but I think a "proper" gennel/jennel needs to be old; it has to have walls rather than fences/hedges, and it is between houses or yards. This is actually the O.E.D. definition. There's at least one real gennel right in the city centre, between North Church Street and Paradise Square, and there are no doubt many more. ... Here are some other words for gennel:

 

Liverpool - jigger

North Lincs. - tenfoot

N.E. Lincs. - eightfoot

Midlands and East Anglia - snicket

Sussex and West Kent - twitten

Birmingham - gully

The Wikipedia article has more.....:)

Edited by hillsbro

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To get back to the original point, does anyone have a photo of how it used to be in the 60's? None of the old links from 2008 work anymore, but I remember this shop when it was thriving in the 60's and there was a massive array of fruit and veg set out. I used to go past it on the bus around 8am each morning and it was totally set out then. I left in the later half of the 60's and thought it was probably still going then but may be wrong. It was definately there in 1964/5.

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pierreponts had two veg stalls on the cliff one below attcliffe church next to the bank the other was just passed clay street between the horse meat shop and the post office i was born on brompton road in 1937 and they were there as far back as i can remember after the war whitakers opend a fruit shop and a flower shop abit further up from pierrpoints

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I have been doing my family history and came across the this link while trying to research the greengrocers on Attercliffe common. My mum had told me from being a little girl  that we links with the hangman Albert Pierpoint as her mums (my grandmother) auntie was married to some relation of the hangman. the only other information that she had was that the family also owned the greengrocers on Attercliffe common. It took me a long while to find the marriage as it was a second marriage to George Peirpoint at Kimberworth and my great auntie was down as Helen when her name was Elenor but known to the family as Aunt Ellen. George is on the 1939 register as a retired greengrocer which will tie in. but to date I have not found the link to the hangman or the green grocers on Attercliffe but I had been told from other sources that the greengrocer on Attercliffe was also named Albert. I will continue to research this but if anyone can remember the christian name of any of the green grocers That would be a great help.

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His name was William Pierrepont born 1881 in Dewsbury, his wife was Amelia b 1882 in Warrington. They had a son William Henry b 1906, Darnall and a daughter Amelia b 1908 Attercliffe.

William Henry married Amy Hilda Bashforth in 1931.

Arnold Bashforth married Amelia Pierrepont also in 1931 ....double wedding?

On the 1939 Register they appear to be  living together with his parents at 264 Darnall Road.

   William Pierrepont died in 1970, Amelia in 1963.

William Henry Pierrepont died in 1979, Amy Hilda in 1992.

Amelia Bashforth died in 1986...Arnold in 1972.

Hope this helps...if not let me know and I'll delve a bit further.

Edited by sadbrewer
Clarity

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it was the same name of the hangman wasn't it all those years ago

did he name use to be on our paper money as well a long time ago

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On 7/3/2012 at 7:30 AM, Kelvinlad said:

 

That's what we would have called it where I was brought up.

jennel up at meersbrook during the 1950s

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On ‎7‎/‎3‎/‎2012 at 5:22 AM, Jim Hardie said:

 

I'm from the old Pitsmoor that was flattened in the seventies.

Yes, I'm from the same part of Pitsmoor that was flattened in the 70's and we called that an entry. However, the elderly lady that lived next door called it the passage, but she was originally from Pontefract. As for gennel, like the one that ran by the side of Burngreave school, I pronounced that jennel.

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