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Old Sheffield dialect

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On 05/03/2019 at 12:13, beefface said:

What about;

“It’s neither mucklin nor micklin”  (It’s neither one thing nor another)?

or;

“I’m proper thraiped” (I’m really tired)?

 

 

 I have heard thraiped before, but it meant  giving someone a  good hiding.

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On 05/03/2019 at 20:27, jaffa1 said:

I did it as a kid in the late fifties, our neighbours were very superstitious  and insisted it had to be someone with dark hair who first stepped over their threshold at midnight then go and poke the fire which by tradition this should bring them good fortune throughout  the year.

What about this one I use to rattle out on New Years Eve at midnight.

 

Happy new ,happy new year

Plenty of money and a belly full of beer

Hole in my stocking, hole in my shoe

Please can you spare me a copper or two

If you haven't got a copper a tanner will do

If you haven't got a tanner God bless you.

 

They also had to smear their cheeks/faces with coal dust before entering the house.

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Has all this confirmed the description of Yorkshire folk as ‘strong in t’arm an’ thick in t’ead’😀

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On 03/03/2019 at 02:28, St Petre said:

Coo-ill in Barnsley and boo-its for boots.

No, pronounced coyl.

Coyt for coat.

Shoo-it for shoot.

Spoo-in for spoon.

Too-il for tool.

Stoo-il for stool

Poo-il for pool

Beernz (or beynz) for beans,

etc

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1 hour ago, Nig30 said:

No, pronounced coyl.

Coyt for coat.

Shoo-it for shoot.

Spoo-in for spoon.

Too-il for tool.

Stoo-il for stool

Poo-il for pool

Beernz (or beynz) for beans,

etc

 Ah, the sounds of the lake district.:D

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Thi nuaz...

 

Translation..."You know"...Or. "Your nose".:hihi:

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Using the word "thraiped"  - meaning extremely tired and exhausted - rings a bell. My great-grandad, who died in the mid-60's at the age of 84, used to use a similar word - but he pronounced it as "thraiked".  He'd come indoors, collapse into his armchair, and he'd always say to me " eee lass - I'm reight thraiked"  

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Hi Firethorn....

 

Thanks for the info,  Its good Sheffield likes their dialect. Can you or anyone reading these threads help me as i am now into a new book about Sheffield that still contains dialect but is based upon Sheffield humour - and could do with some funny stories to put in it. Do you have any SHEFFIELD centered stories to tell?  Have you any old photos of the city around 1960's-70's that i could borrow to copy or buy?

(Must be originals)

 

Glad to put whatever you Sheffielders can help with in the new 2019 book.... I can also add your name or just the Forum name if you wish to be anonymous... i will also give a free copy when done for the best photo or funny story.

 

Regards

 

Chris Soyouknow Books

 

 

Edited by SYK books
wider audience

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I remember when my American brother-in-law first visited Sheffield,  shortly after he met my sister. He seemed more than usually fascinated, when told by Sheffielders  (who were teenagers/early-twenties,  in the 70's) that we always used to meet our friends at the fish-tank, in the middle of the Hole-In-The-Road subway, when were going for a night out in town.  Of course, the way the Sheffielders  pronounced it,  it came out as "we'd meet at t'fishtank ..   in't  t'oyl  in't  t'roo-erd"

 

My poor old bro'-in-law had no idea what this meant. He imagined that there was some sort of bizarre surrealist Modern Art sculpture, or some sort of ancient tribal monument in the  city centre - involving a large pool of oil  in the middle of a road - with a large aquarium installed in the middle of it.

😁

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If my mum was shouting my dad would say she sounded like a "common vardyke". Nobody seems to know what this is or even heard of it. His actul words were "you're nowt but a common vardyke".

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I was born in Sheffield and all my family is from there. I love the accent and the use of language. Things that I always considered usual until my family moved away from Sheffield.

 

- Calling the evening meal "tea" instead of "dinner"

- Asking someone to clarify their statements or showing doubt in what they are saying by asking "What's thee on a'baht?"

- Telling someone to stop acting so self-important: "Give o'ver thee sen."

- Referring to a bench as a "form" (my grandfather said this to me just last week)

 

There are so many, but they're all great! 

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