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Old Sheffield dialect

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Favourite Sheffield saying ' Dont do owt fow nowt unless tha dos it for thee sen' and one I often use for my two sons 'Geor wi thi sen',

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There is a Sandy Powell song/monologue of the " don't do owt for nowt" saying on UTube.

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Or even - 

 

Arse laffta.

 

core snot btw in context might be - 

 

does tha think Owls l win a satday?

 

core snot!

 

see if than can get arse laffta now

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See all, hear all, seh nowt; eat all, sup all, pay nowt & if tha'does owt, do it f'thy sen. 

Edited by Baron99

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Has anyone heard the expression 'mummering' ? 

Our mothers used to say it , it was another term for Caroling.

If you were going out mummering you were going out caroling or on

New Years Eve knocking on doors wishing them a Happy New Year.

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56 minutes ago, jaffa1 said:

Has anyone heard the expression 'mummering' ? 

Our mothers used to say it , it was another term for Caroling.

If you were going out mummering you were going out caroling or on

New Years Eve knocking on doors wishing them a Happy New Year.

The last time I heard anyone coming round on New Year's Eve was in the early 1950s. They used to sing a song which included the lines: "The log was burning brightly" & ending in "The old year out & the New Year in". I can't remember any more.

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What about;

“It’s neither mucklin nor micklin”  (It’s neither one thing nor another)?

or;

“I’m proper thraiped” (I’m really tired)?

 

 

Edited by beefface

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3 hours ago, fatrajah said:

The last time I heard anyone coming round on New Year's Eve was in the early 1950s. They used to sing a song which included the lines: "The log was burning brightly" & ending in "The old year out & the New Year in". I can't remember any more.

I did it as a kid in the late fifties, our neighbours were very superstitious  and insisted it had to be someone with dark hair who first stepped over their threshold at midnight then go and poke the fire which by tradition this should bring them good fortune throughout  the year.

What about this one I use to rattle out on New Years Eve at midnight.

 

Happy new ,happy new year

Plenty of money and a belly full of beer

Hole in my stocking, hole in my shoe

Please can you spare me a copper or two

If you haven't got a copper a tanner will do

If you haven't got a tanner God bless you.

 

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The one we had was - 

 

Happy New Year Happy New Year plenty of money and a cellar full of beer, a horse and a gig and a big fat pig to last you through the year.

 

When I was younger, being tall dark & handsome (!) I was called on to let the new year in. After knocking on the door after the stroke of midnight,  I had to intone the above, then put a piece of coal, which had been left outside on the window sill, on the fire and then propose a toast - to 19 whatever it was, health , wealth and happiness.

 

Ah for the good old days!

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8 minutes ago, Freebooter said:

The one we had was - 

 

Happy New Year Happy New Year plenty of money and a cellar full of beer, a horse and a gig and a big fat pig to last you through the year.

 

When I was younger, being tall dark & handsome (!) I was called on to let the new year in. After knocking on the door after the stroke of midnight,  I had to intone the above, then put a piece of coal, which had been left outside on the window sill, on the fire and then propose a toast - to 19 whatever it was, health , wealth and happiness.

 

Ah for the good old days!

How times have changed.

Yes you're right it was cellar full of beer ( wonder what made me think belly, ha )

And now you've  put the horse and a gig I remember that too.

What was a gig, a party?

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I'm fairly certain this was a small carriage, like a posh cart for carrying one or two people.

It looks like my version came first, cellar full turned into bellyfull, it just gets better!!

Letting the new year in was known as first footing and meant to bring luck for the new year, some first footers would even rub coal dust on their face. I guess that the chimney sweep at the wedding was along the same lines.

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Does anyone else's family say that a baby is thrussen when its had a good feed?  I've only ever heard my family say it.

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