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Old Sheffield dialect

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On 25/02/2019 at 17:59, tinfoilhat said:

Where's tha bin? Bin on holiday. Where's tha wheelie bin? I've wheelie bin on holiday!

Skeggie? Nah, I'm reyt 'anded.

 

 

 

'

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Number of times I've been looked at strangely, (& nearly thumped), when not in Sheffield & telling someone in my Sheffield accent & phrase that they are unable to complete a task by saying, "You c' **t do that!" 

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Heh heh heh,  Baron99. Your post brought back memories and made me chuckle. When I first moved to live and work London, about 40 years ago, my new boss, who I'd only just met, told me that he thought he could get a certain project finished by the end of the week....to which I innocently replied "you c'--t".  Next thing I knew, I was called into my senior manager's office to attend a disciplinary interview for "using foul, obscene or abusive language" towards my line manager. Took me quite a while to explain that I wasn't actually calling him a "c--t".... I was merely expressing my professional opinion that he perhaps couldn't achieve his target.

😁

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My last post also reminds me of another amusing incident, which also happened not long after I moved to London, way back in '79. A colleague of mine, a nice lad from Rotherham, rang in sick one Monday morning, to say that he'd had an accident at the weekend and couldn't make it in to work, because he had a pot on his leg.

 

The whole office was agog for days, wondering what sort of accident Charlie could have had, that would have resulted in him ending up with either a saucepan or a flowerpot  attached to his leg.  Of course, I could have explained to our colleagues exactly what it means to have a pot leg...or a pot arm - but I didn't - I just sat back and chuckled as they speculated. 

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21 hours ago, Longcol said:

Skeggie? Nah, I'm reyt 'anded.

 

 

 

'

Anuthergudden, tha deserves a prize, laft til tears ran dahn meleg.

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On 29/04/2005 at 02:57, Fareast said:

To Nick 2:-

I know this is a bit of an indirect reference but did your Grandma ever use the word " Posser " or "Postle " or even "Posher "?

I believe these were all references to a stick with a half-globe on the end of it, perforated with holes ; globe was made of metal

In the days before washing machines , women would fill a tub with hot soapy water and the washing of course and then push with the "posher".Because of the perforations all the washing would be churned up.Took ages !

Anyway , my mother always called it the "posher" , I've heard of "postle" and since one sort of poked with a stick , I wondered if there might be a connection ?

Told you it was indirect !

That wer "ponch" owd luv.

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Does anyone recall the word ‘togger’ as a synonym for football ? (I’m talking c 60 years ago)

I was listening to Radio Derby about two weeks ago and there was a chap from north Derbyshire who did National Service in the fifties, he had asked his fellow new recruits if anyone fancied a game of togger. None of these southern jessies had heard of the term -but- he was ‘christened with the nickname ‘Togger’ for the remainder of his two years.

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On 21/03/2016 at 07:54, Cazzerb65 said:

There is a book called Sheffieldish. Not sure if you can still get it new though. It's so good. They must have a copy in a library somewhere.

 
 

I recall the original version of Sheffieldish with cartoons on the front cover, one of them has a stray dog following a man who's walking down a street,  he shouted at it 'Gerr-ooo-am ' !

 

On 21/03/2016 at 14:37, Plain Talker said:

 

Aye, 'tis. Thar't reight.

Sum as laiks mundies, sum laiks tuesdies sum even laiks wensdies!

Ah Wensdies, people from north east Derbyshire's name for the Owls.

 

On 25/03/2016 at 12:51, mossdog said:

OK all you ...dee-da academics, what is the meaning of this word......"worrit"

As in ' that pencil tha gid mi were broke'........'worrit' ?

 

On 26/03/2016 at 11:53, mickdalewood said:

When I was at school the teacher put some words up on the board for us to put in a sentence and one was coil and one lad wrote,

 

Today the coil man delivered some coil

Remind me of one time at school (in Pitsmoor) when the teacher asked us not to orate but write down what we thought were the words of the Lord's Prayer', lad next to me wrote :' Our Father who art in heaven, HAROLD be thy name'.

 

Although not dialect, there is a Sheffield area expression for wedded people having discreet (or not so discreet) affairs outside the marriage as having a Fancy man/woman, is that a Sheffield only term ?

 

Not dialect but 'Brrr...it's cowd enuff for two pair o'braces' !

 

 

On 29/04/2005 at 02:57, Fareast said:

To Nick 2:-

I know this is a bit of an indirect reference but did your Grandma ever use the word " Posser " or "Postle " or even "Posher "?

I believe these were all references to a stick with a half-globe on the end of it, perforated with holes ; globe was made of metal

In the days before washing machines , women would fill a tub with hot soapy water and the washing of course and then push with the "posher".Because of the perforations all the washing would be churned up.Took ages !

Anyway , my mother always called it the "posher" , I've heard of "postle" and since one sort of poked with a stick , I wondered if there might be a connection ?

Told you it was indirect !

My Sheffield born mother called that objecct a 'ponch'.

 

On 01/09/2013 at 21:05, FIRETHORN1 said:

form"Loppy"... "Rammy"... "Breadcake"..... I've never heard any of these words said outside of Sheffield (or maybe Barnsley, Rotherham. Donny) either.

 

Keep 'em coming everyone... this is a highly entertaining and nostalgic thread. I'm lovin' it!

 

How about the word "slottened"? My mum would always use this word to describe when we came home covered and soaked from head to foot in something nasty - like if we fell in a stagnant pond, we "came home slottened in muck n' slime", or if we did something that bled profusely - like cut the sole of a foot on a bit of broken glass or got into a fight and got a bloody nose, we "came home slottened in blood".

 

Rammy is another form of the word rammel, meaning discarded , useless or waste matter.

 

On 19/03/2016 at 12:16, the_bloke said:

I've lived all over the country, and some of these 'Sheffield' words aren't at all.

 

I'd not encountered 'loppy' before living here though. Words like 'clarty', 'chuffin', 'pip' (as in the horn on the car, 'snicket', phrases like 'our lass', 'dab on' etc are used all over the north.

 

It's also not something exclusive to the north either, the south has equally silly words to describe the mundane. Where I grew up in Portsmouth, if you cried or told tales you were a squinny; I've used that here a few times and got a look as blank as if I'd asked for a breadcake in a bakery down south.

 

 

On 19/03/2016 at 15:26, ANGELFIRE1 said:
the_bloke said:
I've lived all over the country, and some of these 'Sheffield' words aren't at all.

 

 

 

I have to agree with the above, many of the "words" are used elsewhere besides Sheffield. Maybe they started in our part of Yorkshire, but they have spread far and wide that's for sure.

 

Lakin, around us means missing a shift at work on purpose when there is nowt wrong with you.

 

Angel1.

I thought the Sheffield expression for that was 'skyving'.

 

On 20/03/2016 at 23:53, kidley said:

coy-ill in sheffield commonly called coal els where

Coo-ill in Barnsley and boo-its for boots.

Edited by St Petre
add

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4 hours ago, St Petre said:

Although not dialect, there is a Sheffield area expression for wedded people having discreet (or not so discreet) affairs outside the marriage as having a Fancy man/woman, is that a Sheffield only term ?

Its Mankin ,they must have used that in Pitsmoor din't thi.

 

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As I've just merged 10 posts by one person in a row, this a good time to remind you there is an edit button. You should not be multi posting as per the forum rules.

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22 hours ago, Freebooter said:
On 29/04/2005 at 02:57, Fareast said:

To Nick 2:-

I know this is a bit of an indirect reference but did your Grandma ever use the word " Posser " or "Postle " or even "Posher "?

I believe these were all references to a stick with a half-globe on the end of it, perforated with holes ; globe was made of metal

In the days before washing machines , women would fill a tub with hot soapy water and the washing of course and then push with the "posher".Because of the perforations all the washing would be churned up.Took ages !

Anyway , my mother always called it the "posher" , I've heard of "postle" and since one sort of poked with a stick , I wondered if there might be a connection ?

Told you it was indirect !

 

That wer "ponch" owd luv.

My Sheffield gran would call it a 'Podger'. 

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Ow Abaht - 

E wer gerrin a bit stroppy so a lamptim

 

or

 

A cant shut dooer reight, must a gorrabit skellered

 

or 

 

core snot

 

 

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