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Old Sheffield dialect

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always thought crosseld meant burnt, as in," ows tha like thi bacon"? "crosseld or aif dun?"

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Ge-ore wit de. . (give over with you. . )

 

I've said that to some non-sheffs and their response was as though I'd said summat in a different language. .

 

cant fault sheffieldish!!!

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Originally posted by screamingwitch

mardy being miserable

 

Sulking is an essential part of being mardy, surely?

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Yitten - was a word used to mean scared.

 

Ganzy - a jumper or pullover

 

eightfoot - a ginnel or footpath

 

 

Regards

 

Tazz

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I love 'yitten', my dad always says it to us.

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If single words fool the Southerners then a whole sentence will really leave em gobsmacked. Like " Gioer roorin mardy arse and get thissen off ooem" ..............next suggestion please.

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Originally posted by pitsmoorlad

If single words fool the Southerners then a whole sentence will really leave em gobsmacked. Like " Gioer roorin mardy arse and get thissen off ooem" ..............next suggestion please.

 

Which, translated, means? (And I'm not a Southerner).

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oh i love stuff like this, again sorry if im repeating an earlier post i just dont have time to read them before i reply

 

i once said to my friend from London "im dead cold" and she didnt understand why i said dead?

 

another one is when i would say the hours i was working i said "9 while 5"

 

my friend from further north said "why the 'while' and not until"

is it just my bad english lol??

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Originally posted by leddi

is it just my bad english lol??

 

Yes.

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Originally posted by t020

Yes.

 

The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary. -- James D. Nicoll

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