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Looking for help to claim a U.K. pension

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That poster posted 3 times in 2008, whatever he's doing with his pension, he's not checking here for advice 9 years later.

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That poster posted 3 times in 2008, whatever he's doing with his pension, he's not checking here for advice 9 years later.

 

In my case I had to post under the heading I was given and other previous posts came under it which I could not help, even if they are 9 years old !

Edited by stpetre
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I am looking into applying for my UK pension. I have looked at the on line forms but before I start on them I have a couple of questions: I cannot remember my National Insurance number and my last employer in Sheffield went down the tubes in the 1990's (I worked there in two stints for 21 years). I worked from 1962 to 1986. I emigrated to the USA in 1986 and wonder if any expats have had problems or success when dealing with the pension people ? I ask in case I may encounter problems when I fill out the application forms.

 

They will have records of your employment in Newcastle. Tell them you have forgotten your NHI number, but they will be able to sort things out with your birth certificate , names and addresses of employers and as many addresses that you can remember , where you resided. Talk to them by phone first, they are very helpful and will guide you through the process, it's not expensive with a $5phone card, you can talk for hours to the UK. The number for international callers s listed on the UK pensions website.

 

---------- Post added 22-05-2017 at 23:44 ----------

 

'Before leaving for Canada in 1975 I worked for Barclays Bank PLC for a number of years. When I left they told me of my pension entitlement in 2008. However they tell me now they have no record of me. Does the U.K. have any Ombudsman or Government Office that helps people who are being denied pension benefits? '

 

I have had problems with Barclays. It seems like they are always a problem when they have to pay something out.

They have an internal "ombudsmen" and they force you to go through them before you can go to the Banking Association to complain. If you don't consult them first they will not respond until you do.

You will have to contact them to get the contact info. for their so called "Ombudsman." Keep in mind that he/she is on the Barclays payroll

 

Barclays, oh dear what a joke they are. When my Mum died in 2008 my younger brother dealt with everything in England and when was all said and done we were 50/50 beneficiaries of her estate . Well for starters Barclays sent both amounts to me. My bank asked me to go in and talk about it. What would you know it took 8 weeks for Barclays to admit they had done anything wrong and the money was in no man's land for months. Neither

my brother nor I got an apology from Barclays for what turned out to be a clerical error on their part.

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I am looking into applying for my UK pension. I have looked at the on line forms but before I start on them I have a couple of questions: I cannot remember my National Insurance number and my last employer in Sheffield went down the tubes in the 1990's (I worked there in two stints for 21 years). I worked from 1962 to 1986. I emigrated to the USA in 1986 and wonder if any expats have had problems or success when dealing with the pension people ? I ask in case I may encounter problems when I fill out the application forms.

If you get your pension you will get increases tied to the U.K. System

For some reason in Canada it is frozen at the rate you fist get

I have been getting it for 13 years and it has never increased

It fluctuates with the value of the £ but the £ rate stays the same

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If you get your pension you will get increases tied to the U.K. System

For some reason in Canada it is frozen at the rate you fist get

I have been getting it for 13 years and it has never increased

It fluctuates with the value of the £ but the £ rate stays the same

 

That reason was Margaret Thatcher, the Canadian government did all they could to get an agreement, but it fell on deaf ears over yonder.

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Try calling the Dept. of Social Security in Newcastle on Tyne. One of these numbers might work.

011 44 191 218 7777

011 44 191 203 0203

011 44 191 218 3809

They will ask for your Social Security number.

 

Do you mean SSN as in USA or National Insurance number (Which I cannot remember) in UK ?

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Do you mean SSN as in USA or National Insurance number (Which I cannot remember) in UK ?

 

It is your national insurance they will ask for, but if you have forgotten it , there is a number to call in Wolverhampton . Google UK Pension Service and look for International Pension Service, There is a Wolverhampton address on there that you can write too. Call them first and they will tell you what to do concerning your forgotten NI number. If you can give them addresses where you lived in England and the places you worked , they will be able to track down your NI payments and will let you know your lost number. Don't know if you are over 65 already, but you should get all retro payments when the dust settles. Be patient because it could take a while to sort it.

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C & P

You need more qualifying years to get a full State Pension and a certain minimum number of years to get any State Pension at all.

 

Who Number of years needed for a full State Pension Number of years needed for any State Pension

Men born before 6 April 1945 44 11

Women born before 6 April 1950 39 10

 

44 years for a full pension 11 years for any

 

https://www.gov.uk/state-pension/eligibility

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C & P

You need more qualifying years to get a full State Pension and a certain minimum number of years to get any State Pension at all.

 

Who Number of years needed for a full State Pension Number of years needed for any State Pension

Men born before 6 April 1945 44 11

Women born before 6 April 1950 39 10

 

44 years for a full pension 11 years for any

 

https://www.gov.uk/state-pension/eligibility

 

I was born in 1947 and started work in Aug. 1962 till Dec.1986. 24 years, where do I fit in ?

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I was born in 1947 and started work in Aug. 1962 till Dec.1986. 24 years, where do I fit in ?

 

 

C & P

You'll get a proportion of the new State Pension if you have between 10 and 35 qualifying years. You have 20 qualifying years on your National Insurance record after 6 April 2016. You divide £159.55 by 35 and then multiply by 20. Your new State Pension will be about

 

You should receive

£91.17 per week.

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C & P

You'll get a proportion of the new State Pension if you have between 10 and 35 qualifying years. You have 20 qualifying years on your National Insurance record after 6 April 2016. You divide £159.55 by 35 and then multiply by 20. Your new State Pension will be about

 

You should receive

£91.17 per week.

 

This doesn't take into account deferment. For every five weeks a state pension is deferred it increases by 1% or 10.4% for every full year.

If the pension had been taken at age 65 in 2012 with 24 qualifying years the weekly pension would have been £159.55 (or whatever the figure was in 2012) divided by 35, then multiplied by 24. If the same person takes the pension this year on his 70th birthday it should increase by 5 x 10.4%.

Presumably the calculation will be based on whatever the full weekly pension was in 2012.

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This doesn't take into account deferment. For every five weeks a state pension is deferred it increases by 1% or 10.4% for every full year.

If the pension had been taken at age 65 in 2012 with 24 qualifying years the weekly pension would have been £159.55 (or whatever the figure was in 2012) divided by 35, then multiplied by 24. If the same person takes the pension this year on his 70th birthday it should increase by 5 x 10.4%.

Presumably the calculation will be based on whatever the full weekly pension was in 2012.

 

I was never very good at maths so I thank you gentlemen, Mr.T., Kidley and Jim. Ps, Does how old I am now (70) make any difference ?

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