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Pit Slag Heaps at the Manor Top

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We used to play on the slag heap (c1955) the tunnel was bricked up when Mansfield Road was made in to a dual carriageway.

 

The slag was still burning and if you scraped off the surface it would smoke and burn.

 

Just further down Mansfield Road was a small electrical shop, strange character very scruffy as I remember. This was in the days when you could get ions and kettles repaired.

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i remember that shop.....;) heres one for you mr.smith,and shakespear, i used to play on the red hills about the same time,late 50's 60's, they were below the prefabs and on the hill leading to normanton springs ,they were bright red shale mounds,how and when were they deposited ?

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i remember that shop.....;) heres one for you mr.smith,and shakespear, i used to play on the red hills about the same time,late 50's 60's, they were below the prefabs and on the hill leading to normanton springs ,they were bright red shale mounds,how and when were they deposited ?

 

Red shale may have been clay workings. If they were orange like rust then it was iron. Not to clear what area you mean. The Shire brook area to Springs had the Birley Coll in it and it had brick works in it. There was another pit at Intake below Fox Wood that had gone by 1906. Any of them could have dumped it.

The brook next to Springwood pub is orange because of iron, was it that kind of colour these shales?

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The farmer who owned Windy House Farm was strangely enough called Alexander Slagg! He died in 1885 aged 74. His grave can still be seen in the churchyard of St John's near Parkhill.

 

Thank you for the very good information. Was or has any connection been made in the Park Area with someone call Ward? Thank you.

 

depoix

Regarding the Red Shale hills, I think they are near Holly Bank.

I do not have a clue. I trust someone else will have.

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Red shale may have been clay workings. If they were orange like rust then it was iron. Not to clear what area you mean. The Shire brook area to Springs had the Birley Coll in it and it had brick works in it. There was another pit at Intake below Fox Wood that had gone by 1906. Any of them could have dumped it.

The brook next to Springwood pub is orange because of iron, was it that kind of colour these shales?

no,i lived near the springwood,it was a deep red coloured shale,the mounds were massive,if you can imagine roof slate,broken into bits ,then dyed red,thats what it looked like

 

on the left was richmond park, then the road to normanton springs,across the road were the hills ,known as the red hills,they spread from richmond park to the road running into birley,the old ten pin bowling alley was opposite and the old rex cinema was above it,we used to go and collect the shale as kids to use it as pathways on the house garden

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on the left was richmond park, then the road to normanton springs,across the road were the hills ,known as the red hills,they spread from richmond park to the road running into birley,the old ten pin bowling alley was opposite and the old rex cinema was above it,we used to go and collect the shale as kids to use it as pathways on the house garden

 

The 1906 OS map shows tips from the Birley Pit in the spot you say was Red Hill. From your description it could have been Red Sandstone and natural, possiably dug up by mineworking. If it was you were scatterring a prehistoric beach, from when Sheffield was truly by the sea! That's why it's called Sandstone. Stone made from beach sand!

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Thank you for the very good information. Was or has any connection been made in the Park Area with someone call Ward? Thank you.

 

[

Lot's of Ward's in the park area. The most famous was Thomas Asline Ward connected to a book called 'Peeps into the past'.

The farmers in the Sheffield Park area where all just about related and the Ward's had a farm called Park House Farm that was demolished in 1934 to make way for the Arbourthorne estate.

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Lot's of Ward's in the park area. The most famous was Thomas Asline Ward connected to a book called 'Peeps into the past'.

The farmers in the Sheffield Park area where all just about related and the Ward's had a farm called Park House Farm that was demolished in 1934 to make way for the Arbourthorne estate.

 

Thank you. - I'm aware that the tenant farmer at Windy House Farm which was situated at the City Road end of Windy House Lane was in the 1920s someone called T.W.Ward. The Ward's had to leave when the Manor Estate was to be built in the 1930s.

 

Has anyone made a connection with what became a big works called, Thos W Ward that existed or still does in Sheffield, or did this Ward come from another part of the country and settled here?

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Thank you. - I'm aware that the tenant farmer at Windy House Farm which was situated at the City Road end of Windy House Lane was in the 1920s someone called T.W.Ward. The Ward's had to leave when the Manor Estate was to be built in the 1930s.

 

Has anyone made a connection with what became a big works called, Thos W Ward that existed or still does in Sheffield, or did this Ward come from another part of the country and settled here?

 

Do you mean Ward's the beer makers?

T W Ward at Windy would have been out by around 1926, He could have been related, but I doubt he set up any firms. By the way the farm at Windy was 210 acres! The brew people were allready around in the 1920's I think?

'Ward' as a name was from the Old English for watchman. So would have been a common name.

 

You could start a new thread about what happened to the Ward family of farmers after the Manor Estate was built?

 

More info on the Birley pits. The 'East' pit was sunk in 1889 and was 779 foot deep. South pit was abandoned 1907 it was only 417ft deep.

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I'll start a thread because someone somewhere always knows something more than anyone else on a certain subject.

The Thomas W Ward I was thinking of were in the Engineering and Scrap metal business.

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I'll start a thread because someone somewhere always knows something more than anyone else.

The Thomas W Ward I was thinking of were in the Engineering and Scrap metal business.

 

Well rather than be accused of being a person of the category you describe, - I take it you mean a 'know-it-all' ?, I can only suggest you consult the card catalogue in the Local Studies Library where I'm sure you'll find references to material they hold about Messrs. T. W. Ward and Co.

 

Good luck !

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Hope you lot don't mean me! If you care to check my public profile you will see that I am historian. The local studies is great. I've been going there since 1978, researching Sheffield Park and the Parish of Handsworth. So I should know more than most people. But there are a lot more rules now in there and many Local Historians will tell you that they have been looking for a picture of something for years and somebody they meet (who's never used LS before) shows them a picture they got from there, that the Local historian has never seen before.

That Wards I know nothing about, because it doesn't fall in the area.

Incidently a picture of the Slag Heap at Manor Top is on there web site and that wasn't in the box of photo's for Manor! (case in point).

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