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'A Spot of Bother' by Mark Haddon.  Its rather weird but I'm halfway through the 500 pages and am enjoying it.

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The Epigenetics Revolution by Nessa Carey

The dedication:
'For Abi Reynolds, who reprogrammed my life'

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I have just have just finished reading Lenny Henry Who am I Again?

It was OK,  starting from his early fame at the age of 16 when he won New Faces and telling us about his mother coming over to live in the UK before he was born. His sisters and step father followed later.

Yes it was interesting but he sort of left off half way which suggests there's  another book to follow. He never got as for as him being knighted.

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On 02/01/2008 at 03:23, pattricia said:

I am reading " The Funniest Thing You Never Said" .It is the ultimate collection of humorous quotations by Rosemary Jarski.If you like a laugh, this is for you.:)

I'll read it. Thanks for sharing.

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This week's chazza shop read was Camino Island by John Grisham, which was surprisingly enjoyable.  A huge  move away from the lawyer type stuff to insurance fraud 😉.  The original F Scott Fitzgerald manuscripts have been audaciously stolen. Can an attractive young writer solve it? You betcha! 

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Just read: My Brother's Killer by D. M. Devine. Another really good mystery by the underrated D. M. Devine (aka Dominic Devine; he used each name for about half his total output). Reprinted a few years ago in the Arcturus Crime Classics series, most of which are well worth reading.

 

Now reading: Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. Not often I venture out of genre fiction into something more literary, but I'm rather enjoying this one - cleverly done and very well written.

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23 hours ago, metalman said:

 

 

Now reading: Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. Not often I venture out of genre fiction into something more literary, but I'm rather enjoying this one - cleverly done and very well written.

Yes Cloud Atlas is a rewardiong read if you stick with it. Lots of people seemed to find it difficult.

 

I've recently finished The Birthday Present by Ruth Rendel writing as Barbara Vine - about a MP's kinky birthday surprise for his mistress and the fallout. I really struggled to get into it as every single person in it was objectionable. When I did eventually finish it it just seemed a wholly pointless novel.

 

Just finished Birthdays for the Dead by Stuart Macbride. A real page turner about a serial killer who tortures young girls and send photos of such to their parents on their birthdays. Very grim but entertaining.

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Enjoyed Unsheltered by Barbara Kingsolver, as always beautifully written. 

 

I also liked Let it Bleed by Ian Rankin, which is probably the only Rebus novel I've actually enjoyed.  I've kept trying because lots of people keep telling me how good he is, but this is the first one I've got through! 

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I, m reading My One True North by Milly Johnson. Being an eclectic reader I, m hoping to start The mirror and the light soon by Hilary Mantel. The Milly Johnson is brilliant. 

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I Love the Bones of You, the autobiography of Christopher Ecclestone. Quite emotional as he describes his body dysmorphia and descent into depression. He grew up in Salford and went to the same college as me.

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just read 'Yorkshire Ripper the secret murders' by Chris Clark and Tim Tate.

Couldn't put it down read the thing in 2 days.

We were drinking at the Jolly Buffer on the day he was arrested and it was common 

knowledge 3 days before any anouncement of him being charged who they had.

if your not squeamish fully recommended.

 

just going to start 'is that bike Diesel mate?' by Paul Carter.

the first person to ride around all the way around Australia on a Diesel engined motorcycle running on Chip fat oil.

 

OK both books arn't new but as a rule I rarely buy new books  anyway.

I can find 2nd hand  books anywhere,  Super markets, charity shops, carboots etc.

The family joke was "our Dad could go down a whole in the ground and find a book"

Proved them right with that one - on having visited the Copper mines on the Great Orme, Llandudno.

when we came to leave only found they have 3 rooms full of books for sale.

Fully Recommend a trip down the mines to anyone (good place to hide from Coro virus lol)

 

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On 15/03/2020 at 12:46, Rockers rule said:

just read 'Yorkshire Ripper the secret murders' by Chris Clark and Tim Tate.

Couldn't put it down read the thing in 2 days.

We were drinking at the Jolly Buffer on the day he was arrested and it was common 

knowledge 3 days before any anouncement of him being charged who they had.

if your not squeamish fully recommended.

 

just going to start 'is that bike Diesel mate?' by Paul Carter.

the first person to ride around all the way around Australia on a Diesel engined motorcycle running on Chip fat oil.

 

OK both books arn't new but as a rule I rarely buy new books  anyway.

I can find 2nd hand  books anywhere,  Super markets, charity shops, carboots etc.

The family joke was "our Dad could go down a whole in the ground and find a book"

Proved them right with that one - on having visited the Copper mines on the Great Orme, Llandudno.

when we came to leave only found they have 3 rooms full of books for sale.

Fully Recommend a trip down the mines to anyone (good place to hide from Coro virus lol)

 

Is it etiquette to answer your own post?

Anyway I did get around to reading Paul Carter's is that bike Diesel mate?.

tell the truth I was disappointed.

The idea of the trials and tribulations of riding a prototype Diesel powered motorcycle around the whole of Australia and writing a book about the exploits on the way sounded a good one. The book was easy enough to read and I did it in two sittings somehow it never achieved the magic of riding a motorcycle though. Something that spoilt it for me although the book is written in a humours way and no doubt the author has some very good friends which were invaluable to the whole quest. The book misses out on an opportunity to glorify the places visited along the way. The map at the beginning of the book is nearly useless as most of the places used for stop overs etc are very rarely to be found on it. I resorted t' Internet for more info on these places.

The Author's background is that of Oil rig worker and this and story's of his workmates from those days some of which help him along during the long trek are more prevalent than getting the real feel of riding a motorcycle such a long way. 

Would I read another of his books? (mostly about oil rigs) probably not.

 

Just starting one of Ben Elton's books (shan't say which one)

I've read a few of his books over the years and enjoyed them all.

Stark - as funny as, but spoiled by the terrible TV series featuring Ben Elton.

Gridlock - fully recommended .

Inconceivable - again fully recommended.

Chart Throb - Any one who watches X Factor, The Voice, or any of the other similar (garbage) programs read Chart Throb and you will never look at them in the same way again without comparing them to the book.

 

Excellent opportunity while on shut down - Open a book.

I'm in isolation in my Garage (nothing new there then)

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