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Favourite Sheffield History Books

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I know what you mean Janner, and I agree, but he's a politico and they're all the same. But he described his childhood area and Sheffield quite good I thought. There was one paragraph about being on a tram and being able to see Burdalls from a certain place. That's the reason I'm going to read it again when I can find it.

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I think Hunter's 'Hallamshire' must rate as the best book on the history of Sheffield,

 

Every book on Sheffield history you pick up has used information from it.

 

Sadly the book is in short supply making it an expensive buy and quite large in size.

 

In my opinion anyone studying local history should read this book before the other ones as so much is left out of the modern books and are rather 'potted' to say the least.

 

Happy Days!

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Roy Hattersly did a book on his childhood and schooldays, naturally I can't remember the title, but it was very good and historic in its way.

 

It's called "A Yorkshire Boyhood" and is easily available new or secondhand from Amazon etc.

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An Owlerton Camera & A Hillsborough Camera

- picture memories by J R Wrigley both contain some great photos.

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I have read many of the suggested titles, but have yet to find a book on Sheffield's medieval history. Any ideas?:huh:

 

Two books by David Hey are useful for a summary of the period - Historic Hallamshire and A History of Sheffield but there isn't very much detailed knowledge of Sheffield's medieval history. Hunter's Hallamshire has a few details, as does a book by T. Walter Hall - A Descriptive Catalogue of Sheffield Manorial Records which contains many extracts of those manorial records that survived.

 

For the late 16th. century onwards there is J. D. Leader's The Records of the Burgery of Sheffield and R. E. Leader's History of the Cutlers Company.

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A couple of books available on line, A Tour of the Don, and the Sheffield Dialect for those who want to know how the dialect was and still is used, no joined up words.

 

http://books.google.com/

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A couple of books available on line, A Tour of the Don, and the Sheffield Dialect for those who want to know how the dialect was and still is used, no joined up words.

http://books.google.com/

 

Thanks for that link, very interesting to see how the Sheffield dialect pronunciation seems to have changed over the century ... and I was surprised to see that originally according to that book 'nesh' did actually mean "poor-spirited", which is how the young'uns seem to use it today ("you're sooo nesh" = "you're a wimp") ...

 

"Wen I wor a lass" etc etc, it meant you felt the cold.

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