IMPORTANT NEWS...

As previously warned, Sheffield Forum is changing to new software - view the preview here

This is scheduled for Sunday 18th Nov. The forum will be closed and unavailable an extended period of time (24-36 hours) to allow for this major transition.

Please note that some private messages will not be transferred. Therefore we strongly urge you to take manual back-ups of any important messages now.
Sheffield Forum

Hinde House Comprehensive

Home > Sheffield > Sheffield History & Expats

Reply To Topic
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
28-04-2004, 12:52   #1
wickerman
Registered User
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Location: SouthWest
Total Posts: 9
Hi, so much time has gone by and most of the folks I knew in the dim and distant past will be nudging 50 by now. But..... I started
at Hinde House Comprehensive in Sept 68 and was finished by
July 70. But that short time is burned on my memory. David Tate, Stuart Lipton, Michael Humberstone. Mr Sagar was the form tutor.

Anyone remember me, I was recalled by my parents to Gloucestershire after a term of particularly rowdy behaviour.

Julian Sims
  Reply With Quote
08-05-2004, 08:30   #2
Cycleracer
Registered User
Cycleracer's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: Longley
Total Posts: 4,452
I started Hinde House in Sept 1970 so you would have left by then.
I started with a tour of the school in July of 1970 and the teacher was Miss Fell.
When i started i was in Sorby, Miss Grigorian and she was my form teacher throughout and tought English.
I can't say i particulary enjoyed my time there but i have a lot of good memories of my 5 years there.
Mr Edwards was the head and Turner was the deputy head.
Crownshaw, Ridgeway and napier were all feared.
  Reply With Quote
10-05-2004, 09:37   #3
wickerman
Registered User
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Location: SouthWest
Total Posts: 9
Hi, and thanks for the reply. Yes you started basically just as I had finished, and had to start at a school in Gloucestershire which was a major cultural shock (not entirely positive). I remember Miss Grigorian very well, I suppose hundreds of years ago she would have been Persian, she was quite cool. But Edwards and Turner were quite the stormtroopers I recall.

Is it true that there was a riot at Hinde House early in your time there? I heard rumour that the kids threw the chairs at the teachers on the assembly hall stage and it made the Sheffield newspaper.

Cheers.

Julian
  Reply With Quote
10-05-2004, 09:59   #4
mojoworking
Registered User
 
Joined: Jan 2004
Total Posts: 2,177
Quote:
Originally posted by Cycleracer
When i started i was in Sorby, Miss Grigorian and she was my form teacher throughout and tought English.
It seems like you weren't "tought" it particularly well

(sorry, sorry sorry, someone just had to do it!)
  Reply With Quote
10-05-2004, 10:04   #5
wickerman
Registered User
 
Joined: Apr 2004
Location: SouthWest
Total Posts: 9
Hahahahahah, nice one. I take it fair and square on the chin, perhaps I meant "taut"

Great way to start Monday morning.

Julian
_______
Sept 68 to July 70 Hinde House Comprehensive! Anyone else out there?
  Reply With Quote
11-05-2004, 08:58   #6
Cycleracer
Registered User
Cycleracer's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: Longley
Total Posts: 4,452
Actually Wickerman he was refering to me.

Anyway, about the riot, yesa the riot happened in 73 when all the school ran riot in the ground, i was actually stopped by a teacher and man handled back into the class room along with my mate and when the rioting pupils passed by the classroom on the outside i had to hide under the tables due to them shouting SCABS and it was very embarrassing.
It made the papers and the next day the school was back to normal.
  Reply With Quote
27-09-2004, 08:20   #7
nsiebert
Registered User
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Location: New Zealand
Total Posts: 144
I remember the riot, I left that school in 1974, the headmaster had to be locked in his office, till it calmed down
I remember Mr Humberstone and music teacher Cecil Smith, who always wore his cape, I remember Mr Smith the maths teacher, who put the fear of God into me
My french teacher was Miss Pitts and a flasher used to appear in the walkway between the school and the graveyard
Mrs Hardy was the dinner lady that kept control in the dining room when we had school dinners
  Reply With Quote
27-09-2004, 09:21   #8
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
I went to the wretched school between 1974 and 1978. The Miss Pitts referred to earlier was one of the very few good teachers. She was also extremely attractive to the male pupils [myself included] with a lovely, angelic face, long blonde hair and , well, there is no denying it, full breasts. In fact, the consonant of her surname should have been changed to another letter, which modesty prevents me from suggesting. She appeared to be fully aware of her sex appeal, and I remember her wicked sense of humour with affection.
Edwards is previously mentioned too. What a terrifying bully that man was. Fortunately, I never crossed his path, but I saw the despicable, cowardly way he humiliated and reduced to tears many of the pupils. He was a kind of bizarre, tall, Welsh Dracula who appeared in a long, swishing cape when least expected. Whenever he did appear, the teachers as well as the pupils seemed to freeze with terror. Yes, it WAS me who painted "Edwards is a *******" on the side of the gymnasium so that the school governors would see it the next day, when he escorted the party around his horrible, huge sprawling school.
The riot, or near riot, was before my time. However, in 76, on Sports Day, a most unfortunate, gangling young teacher called Wybrow was mocked with banners proclaiming that he indulged in self-abuse, pelted with eggs and chased by a mob of aggressive Sixth formers. "The poor man was terrified", said Mrs Lucock, the Art teacher.
What a dreadful, dreadful school. Fortunately, I went on to gain many qualifications after I left. Most didn't have my opportunity to redress their situation.
  Reply With Quote
27-09-2004, 09:46   #9
Plain Talker
Happy Hijaabi
Plain Talker's Avatar
 
Forum Helper
Joined: Feb 2004
Location: scearu hoh, in the valle lacrimarum
Total Posts: 43,470
Mr PT went to that school.

He left just about the time the school leaving age was raised to 16, and there was a cross-over time, where there was a fifth-form year added on, which he refused to stay on for, as he had already got employment lined up, to start on the Monday, after he'd finished the final (fourth) school year on the Friday.

Apparently, a form was supposed to have been sent home to parents to sign to say that they were in agreement to theior child staying on at school for another year. His mother had not signed it, and therefore he was not intending to stay on for this extra year. Well, what was the point? he had employment lined up, and he was going into a trade...

the teacher (i think it must have been the sadistic one, mentioned above, by a few of you) threatened to give Mr PT the cane. this man was a real nasty piece of work, from what Mr PT has told me. totally barbaric.

this teacher had demanded that he stay on, despite the employment and everything, and had been told "there's no point, I am at work on Monday morning!'
Mr pt said "if you come near me with that cane, I will break that rod, and wrap it round your neck."

the teacher approached, and raised the cane, Mr PT took the cane from him (He was built like a brick outhouse even then) and snapped the cane.

the teacher got another cane, and made to treaten Mr PT again, and he did the same to that cane.

and again.

the teacher had called for "back-up" from the other masters. they arrived and were going to restrain mr PT physically whilst this sadist administered the caning.

He told the others the same thing, that if they laid a finger on him, there would be trouble.

"You are only making these threats, to make an example of me in front of the other pupils," Mr PT said, " it's a futile and pointless gesture! I have three days left of school, and I am working on Monday. If you were to commit this same act upon me after the end of the week, it'd be assault, and a police matter"

"Touch me, and you will have ructions on your hands!" Mr PT walked out of the school, there and then.

PT
  Reply With Quote
27-09-2004, 10:13   #10
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
Cheers Plain talker ; your postings are always worth reading. I am sure that we are talking about the same man here. He was a typical cowardly bully , full of confidence with timid children half his size. He must have been in his element at the school. I was fortunately not in his feared double Maths class. He would have CRUCIFIED me, I am certain. Apparently, he had no sympathy for anyone who found mathematics difficult [which, then, included me], and would mercilessly humiliate them in front of the class, which itself was cowed into total silence. There is a place for discipline, but he was without any shadow of doubt a sadist who despised his pupils.
  Reply With Quote
28-09-2004, 05:42   #11
nsiebert
Registered User
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Location: New Zealand
Total Posts: 144
What a surprise to read all this, I have been in New Zealand since 1974 and not spoken to anyone about the old school.
I remember the name they called Miss Pitts, I remember the many pairs of knee high boots she wore.
I think the music teacher was Cecil Dowling, and the lady music teacher was Miss Smith, I have had to put my thinking cap on.
I remember some kids belting a hedgehog to death with tennis rackets on the football field, have things changed at all, surely it must be a better place to be, put me off school, and I left at the end of 5th Form
  Reply With Quote
28-09-2004, 14:03   #12
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
Nsiebert, the battering of hedgehogs was a popular activity [I never joined in, honestly] amongst the more maladjusted and retarded pupils. Also popular, I am told, were trips to Shiregreen Quarry for frog-bashing, the details of which are too revolting and shameful to relate. On a pupil's birthday [this happened to me,once], older pupils would take them by the arms and legs and hurl them down the steep banks that surrounded the infamous "school". This , for some obscure reason, was known as "Barabas" after a biblical character. I was thrown only once, but I remember an unpopular boy being hurled down the banks fourteen times on his fourteenth birthday.
The sight of Miss Pitts in her mini skirts and boots was one of the few glimpses of beauty we were allowed. With a half-smile playing about her lips, she would instruct us in the finer points of past participles, pronunciation, etc, knowing full well that all the boys found her absolutely fascinating. If we were lucky, some fool would temporarily displease the Goddess, and she would sharply say "ECOUTE!", her eyes flashing. Ah, the blue, remembered hills of childhood as someone once said...
  Reply With Quote
28-09-2004, 22:03   #13
Cycleracer
Registered User
Cycleracer's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: Longley
Total Posts: 4,452
I was to be friends with Mr Wainwright the Science teacher and visited his farm on many occations were I helped with his animals.
He used to tell me about Edwards and what the staff thought of him, and he was a bully to them to.
Knowing he was feared by the staff as well as the pupils is scarey.
He was'nt a pleasant man in any shape or form and only crossed his path once.
Once was once to often to.
Now his deputy was Turner, a mild mannered man who was approachable and Miss Mason, a happy eldish lady who was as nice as pie but had a temper if you got on her wrong side.
Whatever happened to Edwards and though he will surely be well retired now if he is still around, what would he get away with these days.
He was certainly a disaplinarian in every shape and form but it was'nt a bad thing when you look back in history and think that this kind of disapline is well needed in schools today.
  Reply With Quote
29-09-2004, 12:24   #14
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
Cycleracer, your posting is very interesting. I remember Miss or Mrs Mason, a rather nice lady who always called us, "boys and girls" to the amusement of the cynical amongst us. I am not surprised that Edwards bullied his staff as well as pupils; a sadist in a position of authority in a school like this would pick on anyone below him, i.e, everybody. I take your point regarding the lack of discipline in schools [I teach in higher ed, myself], but I must respectfully disagree with your endorsement of Edwards' approach. If I have misinterpreted your point, I apologise. I witnessed the man deliberately single out particular pupils for no reason other than to bully, humiliate and distress them. His attitude to the pupils was absolutely barbaric [and, believe me, I am no liberal with an aversion to discipline and punishment]. My uncle was friendly with the Head of Concord Middle School, John Roch [they served as JPs together in the seventies], and apparently Roch considered Edwards to be a sadistic bully too. If the caped one is still alive, I would reckon that he is around 92 years of age. I think he retired around 1977. The alternative possibility is that we owe a debt of thanks to some, brave Sheffield version of Van Helsing, for doing the business with a sharpened stake.
  Reply With Quote
29-09-2004, 17:54   #15
Cycleracer
Registered User
Cycleracer's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: Longley
Total Posts: 4,452
Timo,, your absolutely correct Edwards did single out pupils but as we queued up for the assembly outside his office he would sometimes come out into the corridor and you would then hear a pin drop.
I once saw him pull out my best mate from the queue and he was in tears, very frightened and he was dragged by the scruff of the neck into his office.
I was glad that were'nt me but the fear was real.
I regulary saw him pick out the school bullies and hard cases at the time and I personally found that amusing, the hard man of the school put down to a gibbering wreck and they dare not answer him back.

I understand were your coming from and although Edwards was a bully his decipline worked and he was feared in a big way.
Ridgeway and Napier were also strict to but they did not bully you like Edwards did and the old Edwards stare was usually enough to get the pupils quiet.

Last edited by Cycleracer; 29-09-2004 at 17:59.
  Reply With Quote
29-09-2004, 18:30   #16
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
Cycleracer, yes I can see your point too regarding Edwards' treatment of the self-styled hardmen. The problem was that the man used the same treatment on often usually well-behaved, and sometimes innocent pupils. His treatment of female pupils was as bad as his treatment of the boys. I once saw him drag a girl by the throat. She was absolutely terrified. Her crime? Daring to play a little tune on the school piano at break! If it were not so tragic, it would be almost funny.
Of course, teachers like this leave themselves open to revenge by former pupils. As a tutor myself, I always keep in mind the appalling examples set by those such as our sinister, caped sadist, and I try to treat students with kindness and respect. Although, to be fair, I teach adults who CHOOSE to be there. I have no doubt that Edwards had a daunting task as head of such a large, sprawling school. I know that a minority of the pupils certainly did require firm handling, but he revelled in causing terror. On reflection, such a man deserves our pity just as much as our contempt.
  Reply With Quote
30-09-2004, 00:48   #17
Cycleracer
Registered User
Cycleracer's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2003
Location: Longley
Total Posts: 4,452
Funny enough Timo since I left Hinde House in 1975 I have always be intrigued by Edwards and would love to read about the man himself , where and how he lived away from school, what was he like to his family and despite everything bad about him he is an interesting subject.
It would be interesting to hear from anyone who knew him outside or maybe a teacher from his generation who could shed light on the man himself.
Edwards has a face you never forget.
I am inspired to open a thread on him.
  Reply With Quote
01-10-2004, 10:39   #18
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
Cycleracer, you sound like a good lad to me. The Edwards thread is a good idea. I'll join you in a minute...
  Reply With Quote
01-10-2004, 10:48   #19
nsiebert
Registered User
 
Joined: Sep 2004
Location: New Zealand
Total Posts: 144
You all have vivid memories of Edwards, does anyone remember the old bus that was bought for school trips.
I only went on a couple of outings, and one was to go to Granville College to see what courses were available etc.
I remember going up the drive to the college, most of us hid on the floor we were so ashamed.
When the fund raising was done we thought it would be a coach, but it was some really old thing, looked like world war II vintage.
  Reply With Quote
01-10-2004, 11:12   #20
timo
Registered User
timo's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2004
Location: Wrong side of the Pennines
Total Posts: 3,055
Nadine, I believe that Edwards bought it from his old Kamarads in Das Reich SS Division!
  Reply With Quote
Reply To Topic

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:27.
POSTS ON THIS FORUM ARE NOT ACTIVELY MONITORED
Click "Report Post" under any post which may breach our terms of use.
©2002-2017 Sheffield Forum | Powered by vBulletin ©2018