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07-12-2017, 12:31   #101
lazarus
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Originally Posted by RiffRaff View Post
There was/is a pub in Worksop called "The Frog and Nightgown"...
This is a result of some spotty Herbert putting forward a stupid name to replace what must have been a normal pub name.

---------- Post added 07-12-2017 at 11:33 ----------

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Originally Posted by gaz 786 View Post
A favourite pub in Grimesthorpe was called the WHO CAN TELL anyone know how it got the name ???
This pub was named after a horse that won a race or won the last held race at the Crookesmoor racecourse, now sadly gone.
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07-12-2017, 15:10   #102
fatrajah
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There is a pub on the Chesterfield to Mansfield road called "The Young Vanish." Apparently there was a racehorse of that name in the 19th century.
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07-12-2017, 17:41   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
This is a result of some spotty Herbert putting forward a stupid name to replace what must have been a normal pub name.

---------- Post added 07-12-2017 at 11:33 ----------


This pub was named after a horse that won a race or won the last held race at the Crookesmoor racecourse, now sadly gone.
In 1978 there was a Frog and Nightgown on the Old Kent Road, London.
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08-12-2017, 19:11   #104
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I went on a fishing trip to March in Cambridgeshire The owner of the pub we stayed at had lost an eye in the RN. The pubs name was The one eyed red lion.
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08-12-2017, 20:22   #105
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The Jervis Lumb and the hen & chickens always feel quite unique
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09-12-2017, 06:42   #106
lazarus
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Originally Posted by Wonder Boy View Post
The Jervis Lumb and the hen & chickens always feel quite unique
The Jervis Lumb was named after the after area where it was built, it's not a made up name and as for the Hen & Chickens, well that speaks for itself.
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09-12-2017, 10:14   #107
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The Cremorne
Pig and Whistle
Dove and Rainbow (lovely name)

---------- Post added 09-12-2017 at 17:21 ----------

The Florist

---------- Post added 09-12-2017 at 17:30 ----------

If I ever open a pub it will be named 'The Floppy Ferret'
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12-12-2017, 15:06   #108
sherman1959
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Whetstone at the bottom of the moor
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13-12-2017, 19:20   #109
stpetre
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What about pubs that had names that didn't take much imagination or thinking about ? The Sheffield Arms (Upwell Street) for instance, they might have called it Grimesthorpe this or that to reflect the area, 'Upwell Inn' might not have been a wise choice tho'.
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13-12-2017, 21:06   #110
kidley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpetre View Post
What about pubs that had names that didn't take much imagination or thinking about ? The Sheffield Arms (Upwell Street) for instance, they might have called it Grimesthorpe this or that to reflect the area, 'Upwell Inn' might not have been a wise choice tho'.
my bold

it would have been an excellent choice after all, there are plenty of pubs called **** in.
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13-12-2017, 21:21   #111
stpetre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidley View Post
my bold

it would have been an excellent choice after all, there are plenty of pubs called **** in.
Thank you kidley, and you're right, my point being the term 'Sheffield' in a pub's title, was there another ?
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13-12-2017, 21:36   #112
sherman1959
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpetre View Post
What about pubs that had names that didn't take much imagination or thinking about ? The Sheffield Arms (Upwell Street) for instance, they might have called it Grimesthorpe this or that to reflect the area, 'Upwell Inn' might not have been a wise choice tho'.
I know itís obvious..cos it was surrounded by cutlery firms ..but to someone who does not know about terms ....itís not so obvious
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13-12-2017, 22:57   #113
Ontarian1981
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpetre View Post
What about pubs that had names that didn't take much imagination or thinking about ? The Sheffield Arms (Upwell Street) for instance, they might have called it Grimesthorpe this or that to reflect the area, 'Upwell Inn' might not have been a wise choice tho'.
Mid 70s, I was staying at a pub called The Wrestlers Arms at St. Neots near Cambridge, while working in the area. Some locals called it Billy's after Mohawk wrestler Billy Two Rivers.
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13-12-2017, 23:16   #114
trastrick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sherman1959 View Post
I know itís obvious..cos it was surrounded by cutlery firms ..but to someone who does not know about terms ....itís not so obvious
The Ram More Inn bus stop was always a favorite with cheeky bus conductors!

They also used to make fun of my street, Hard Up Road!
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14-12-2017, 20:43   #115
choogling
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**** inn and pleasant inn both at Oughtibridge.the first word is the male of a chicken.

Last edited by choogling; 14-12-2017 at 20:46.
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15-12-2017, 11:51   #116
Annie Bynnol
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stpetre View Post
What about pubs that had names that didn't take much imagination or thinking about ? The Sheffield Arms (Upwell Street) for instance, they might have called it Grimesthorpe this or that to reflect the area, 'Upwell Inn' might not have been a wise choice tho'.
The Sheffield Arms is a perfectly sensible name to give to a pub which attracted its custom from Sheffield. Brightside and Grimethorpe were separate villages and were not considered as part of Sheffield until the 1840s when they became townships.
Upwell Street is an ancient route.
This was a description of Brightside written in 1838:
"The pleasantness of its situation has caused Brightside to be much frequented by pleasure parties from Sheffield. On every fine Sabbath especially, the sallow artizan may be seen wending his way thither, to inhale the freshness of the country air, and enjoy the beautiful and extensive prospect which the hill affords. "

"...and the consequence (of the opening of the railway in 183 is, that the publicans of Brightside have the mortification of beholding their quondam customers gliding past their very doors to consign to the pockets of the more fortunate retailers of spirits in a more distant town(Rotherham), those gains which they had been accustomed to calculate upon as theirs."

---------- Post added 15-12-2017 at 10:53 ----------

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Originally Posted by choogling View Post
**** inn and pleasant inn both at Oughtibridge.the first word is the male of a chicken.
The "****" in "The **** Inn" is a horse.
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15-12-2017, 12:19   #117
kidley
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[

[/COLOR]

The "****" in "The **** Inn" is a horse.[/QUOTE]

I personally would not have thought it meant any thing els ride a **** horse to Banbury cross and all that.
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15-12-2017, 15:25   #118
lazarus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidley View Post
[

[/COLOR]

The "****" in "The **** Inn" is a horse.
I personally would not have thought it meant any thing els ride a **** horse to Banbury cross and all that.[/QUOTE]

As its already been mentioned, a **** Horse was a stronger horse added to another horse to help pull a larger load, but it was to pull canal barges not wagons as they already had one, two, four or six horses in the traces.

---------- Post added 15-12-2017 at 14:26 ----------

Just why is the name of a horse being edited? P.C. brigade strike again, use your own common sense.
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15-12-2017, 20:42   #119
Annie Bynnol
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Originally Posted by lazarus View Post
I personally would not have thought it meant any thing els ride a **** horse to Banbury cross and all that.

As its already been mentioned, a **** Horse was a stronger horse added to another horse to help pull a larger load, but it was to pull canal barges not wagons as they already had one, two, four or six horses in the traces.

The rhyme about Banbury cross predates the Oxford Canal by over a hundred years.
Pubs and hotels associated with a CockHorse also predate canals and have a history of stabling horse on demanding routes.

The association with canals is probable but not the origin of the term.

Last edited by Annie Bynnol; 15-12-2017 at 20:47.
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15-12-2017, 21:29   #120
gaz 786
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie Bynnol View Post
The Sheffield Arms is a perfectly sensible name to give to a pub which attracted its custom from Sheffield. Brightside and Grimethorpe were separate villages and were not considered as part of Sheffield until the 1840s when they became townships.
Upwell Street is an ancient route.
This was a description of Brightside written in 1838:
"The pleasantness of its situation has caused Brightside to be much frequented by pleasure parties from Sheffield. On every fine Sabbath especially, the sallow artizan may be seen wending his way thither, to inhale the freshness of the country air, and enjoy the beautiful and extensive prospect which the hill affords. "

"...and the consequence (of the opening of the railway in 183 is, that the publicans of Brightside have the mortification of beholding their quondam customers gliding past their very doors to consign to the pockets of the more fortunate retailers of spirits in a more distant town(Rotherham), those gains which they had been accustomed to calculate upon as theirs."

---------- Post added 15-12-2017 at 10:53 ----------



The "****" in "The **** Inn" is a horse.
Thats a nice epitaph for the Arms .... Very interesting thanks
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