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Antijammer

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  1. I recently reached 85 and still wonder if there are any you left who can still answer.If so I would enjoy hearing from you
  2. I went by bus (#102) to Sheffield schools from 1943 to 1950 and paid 1/2 d for the whole period.
  3. Four years ago I wrote asking if any students who were at Carfield Intermediate during the period 1943-1947 were still with us.Now that I've passed the eighty- year- old threshhold, I am even more curious. I have very fond memories of the students and most of the staff at Carfield and would enjoy knowing that some of us are still alive and well. If you have the energy and can still hit the keys, please respond to see if we can get some communications going.
  4. Even worse than having a tooth extracted was having one filled.In the old days (1937-1943) the dentist used a low speed drill which looked somewhat like a spinning wheel.The dentist pressed his right foot down on a treadle, which was attached to a large wheel, causing the wheel to rotate.The large wheel was in turn connected via a thin belt to a much smaller wheel that caused the drill to rotate. If the dentist's right leg got tired, the drill would slow down, and a painful tooth would become even more painful! Thank Providence for high speed drills and novacaine.
  5. I don't remember Rowlinson (it probably had not been built when I left for the USA in 1957 ), but I do remember Mr Kay. He was our Headmaster at Carfield Intermediate in the 1940's.Of all the teachers I had durring my educational years, he was the standout. He treated everyone fairly and with respect (even the troublemakers like me). On one occasion he gave me four strokes of the cane on my hands, which I have always felt was well deserved. Mr Kay was indeed a remarkable, gentle man.
  6. $38,900 in 1965. 4 beds and 2.5 baths with 1 acre of woods inhabited by turkeys, hawks, deer, and an occasional coyote. Walk to both work and local Tennis and Swim Club. Lived there for 46 years and still enjoying it.
  7. QUOTE=Jean J;6905118]also if my memory serves me right Winter st hospital was a TB hospital I worked at Winter St. hospital as a porter in the summer vacation of 1950 just before going to University. The hospital did indeed take care of T B patients. I remember being interviewed for the job by a Mr Wall, who warned me that the man previously holding the job had been found in the potato shed in a compromising situation and that I should take care. I don't know what the food was like, but the patients were always asking us to bring them fish and chips. I must say I enjoyed the weeks spent at Winter Street ( they were far different from those of a summer vacation spent in a rolling mill).
  8. I worked at Winter St. hospital as a porter in the summer vacation of 1950 just before going to University. The hospital did indeed take care of T B patients. I remember being interviewed for the job by a Mr Wall, who warned me that the man previously holding the job had been found in the potato shed in a compromising situation and that I should take care. I don't know what the food was like, but the patients were always asking us to bring them fish and chips. I must say I enjoyed the weeks spent at Winter Street ( they were far different from those of a summer vacation spent in a rolling mill).
  9. Any students attend the Halle Orchestra concerts at the City Hall in the late 40's ? I remember as a student that we were able to obtain inexpensive tickets (from Wilson Pecks) to even the most popular concerts.We all sat on seats behind the platform and had a great view of the members of the orchestra. Since we all faced Sir John, we could see when he pulled a face because some section was too loud or too soft. Providing cheap tickets for a world class orchestra was a great way to give school kids a love of music that would last a lifetime, I know in my case it did.
  10. It is sixty years since I saw the bungalow you mentioned, so many changes have probably been made in that area. If you drive the full length of Gleadless Road going towards Gleadless Town End you will drive up a very steep hill.I am almost certain that the bungalow was at the brow of the hill on your left.If the stone wall is still there you will see a gap in the wall with a chain across.If all that area has been changed, the brow of the only steep hill on Gleadless road is you best bet.
  11. Yes,the Guided Weapons Dept was on the grounds of the old Brooklands race track (as was the aircraft factory).The airfield was in the center of the race track.In 1954 Vickers Armstrong was still building aircraft.
  12. 1954 junior engineer, Guided Weapons Dept, Vickers Armstrong, Weybridge Surrey . Wage 8 pounds / week. I saw an add in the local paper at the time for a butchers assistant at the same wage . I thought how poorly graduate engineers were paid if my wage was typical.To be fair, I must say that within three years of starting at Vickers my wage had more than doubled.
  13. I visited the dentist you mentioned sometime in the years between l947-l950. I remember Mr. Fisher had a very plush waiting room filled with antiques in a beautiful, big house. I also remember his mother coming in and out of the waiting room and talking to some of the patients. But what I remember most was his gorgeous dental assistant. During the dental procedure Mr. Fisher left the surgery. While he was gone, his dental assistant started talking to me about movies. She said she enjoyed going to movies, that there was a very good film on at the Rex, and did I often go to the movies? I said I did and left it at that. Mr. Fisher returned and finished filling my tooth. I left the surgery and started walking home. Only then did I realize that this stunning girl had been suggesting that we go to the movie together. How dense youth can be!
  14. Headmaster of Carfield Intermediate School in the 1940's ,"Old man Yak" (Mr.Kay). Not very original, but there you are ! He was certainly one of the fairest men I've ever met,a real gentle man and there were some tough kids at that school.
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