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S8 Blade

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About S8 Blade

  • Rank
    Registered User
  • Birthday 06/11/1983

Personal Information

  • Location
    Bradway, despite my S8 name
  • Interests
    Sheffield United, Girlguiding
  1. The prescription isn’t just the numbers, it covers the type of lens (brand), the diameter of it and the base curve. The material of the lens is important as this is what allows the oxygen through to the cornea, preventing much more serious damage than the headaches and eye strain you mention, hence why the type of lens must be specified on the prescription. You really shouldn’t be ordering different types to try without the correct checks. You only have one set of eyes, don’t risk them!
  2. Lenses should not be supplied on the internet unless you have a valid prescription for them - if you’re able to order whatever you like I’d doubt they are reputable! A pharmacy wouldn’t issue a different medicine to be one prescribed without consultation with a doctor/pharmacist first so why would you risk your sight by messing with your contact lenses?
  3. Linking the Sainsbury’s to Lowedges Road is clutching at straws... it’s several hundred yards from one end of a mile long road.
  4. My partner was registered at what was Cobnar Road surgery, when we moved to Bradway he was advised that he should move surgeries as they wouldn’t be able to honour a home visit should he require one. So Woodseats may not be available as an alternative.
  5. Happy to recommend RB Allen. They did a loft conversion for us about 18mths ago. No issues at all. Clean, tidy, friendly, prompt etc. https://www.rballan.co.uk
  6. Before you read my response I must stress that I am not qualified in optometry, but do have an interest. I would imagine it depends if any of these methods are approved by the General Optical Council, which each optometrist must be registered with in order to practice. I believe there is little research into such as the Bates Method; and personally believe that a reduced prescription will simply mean your eyes need to work harder in order to see clearly, thus causing further strain on the eye. If you drive, I would expect a struggle for anything to be advised that would leave your corrected sight below the legal driving guidance. If there is anyone who does, I would expect it to be someone working/owning ab independent rather than one of the multiples.
  7. I looked at the Whirlow one and could see Ecclesall Road (an A road) highlighted in red. There is then a dark blue line around the map, and the proposed 20mph zone is INSIDE this blue line. This shows only 'local' roads (residential streets), not the actual main roads. I would expect Greenhill/Meadowhead to be the same. Chesterfield Road (and C.R. South) are also an A Road so I highly doubt this will be 20mph. I would also highly doubt Greenhill Parkway (a B road) would be reduced to 20mph given these are currently 40, there are no houses or footpaths particularly nearby (not right at the side of the road). However roads such as Reney Road, Reney Avenue, Greenfield Road, School Lane etc probably will be reduced (with the exception of Reney Road, there's usually that many parked cars you can't usually get above 20mph anyway)! Same as when they reduced Lowedges - with the exception of Lowedges Road you can't get above 20 anyway.
  8. ...and you're making the assumption that granny can't think for herself and make her own decisions. You're also assuming that granny doesn't have control of her own finances and her relatives have legally been signed over to make those financial decisions on her behalf. All care home CQC ratings (and report findings) are available to the public, and granny (and her relatives if she wishes) are always very welcome to visit in advance of deciding that's where she'd like to move to.
  9. ...but there is still choice, and that choice will match the individual's care needs. Even for those fully funded by the council have a choice where they go.
  10. Doesn't include 'board and lodgings'?! Are you serious?! The fees include EVERYTHING. Care, food/drink, their room. The only things usually not paid for are hairdressing, podiatry and personal items - toothpaste, shampoo, shower gel etc. Don't believe everything the newspapers write. You have to make your own decision on the individual home. Each person's needs differ to another's, and each home will differ in the needs it can cater for. Absolutely, the bigger and more expensive does not necessarily mean that the level of care will be any better/worse. However, certainly the facilities and size of the bedrooms and communal areas often differ. Of course it's a business. Anything that involves a cost is a business and you'd be narrow minded if you thought otherwise. Everything has to at least break even if not profit, or it wouldn't be able to run. They have bills to pay, staff to pay, buildings to maintain - they don't pay for themselves. I'll repeat what I said before - every individual will be means tested to see what they can afford to pay. Everybody will be entitled to keep the same amount each week (the personal allowance), and any remainder must go towards the cost of the fees (they of course may have some leftover). It also means that every individual has the same access to each home - there's no social divide like there used to be ('I have no money so I have to go in a cheap home but those with lots of money get the best'). Everyone has access to everywhere. ---------- Post added 05-02-2017 at 20:09 ---------- You will have a state pension. That money will go towards your care fees, and the council will cover the rest. You'll be given a personal allowance each week out of your income (pension) that you can spend/save as you wish.
  11. No - a will is for after death. This is fees that need to be paid whilst the individual is still alive, therefore need to find means to pay.
  12. A very good point. These assets also include the sale of furniture or ornaments etc. Anything that would raise funds. You will also be asked for copies of bank statements for all accounts for a period of time so they can calculate income/outgoings (and look for potential savings being transferred to family/friends!). Go through the statements in advance and ensure you know what all the transactions are and how regular they are etc.
  13. Why, thank you very much! I am happy to help where possible. It is a stressful time as it is, without the added stress of finances; trying to work out they're entitled to or not entitled to and how it all works. Our councils often take a lot of stick, but I cannot praise the lady who supported us enough. On the subject of a care home refusing to take someone, as another poster has pointed out; there is somewhere for everyone. Hence why councils now use means testing. Many homes accept those living with dementia, it doesn't necessarily have to be a dementia specific home. I bet 95% of care homes have dementia care facilities.
  14. My nan went into care in Oct 2015 - it was residential care in a nursing home. Whilst she did not have dementia, the home did have residents with dementia. What she was able to pay was assessed, and the council paid the rest. The home's fees were relatively standard (forgive me for not remembering). It's all about means tested these days. The individual is allowed a 'personal allowance' each week, the rest of their income must go towards their care fees. We were aware of the 'sponsor' clause, but we were advised by the finance person at the council that we didn't need to worry about that as the care home was either in a certain band or their fees were under a certain limit (even though the advertised fee was higher). Speak to the care finance team at the council. I honestly found them really helpful. In addition - the fees are often sorted out after the individual has moved into the home, especially if they are moving from hospital or there is risk to continue living at home. Any fees that have accrued will then need paying for once it's sorted out (assuming there is a fee). Does the person in question have a medical need, alongside their dementia? If so, it is worth looking into CHC (continuing healthcare) - this is a top up fee to cover the nursing fees, enabling the individual to be cared for in the community rather than in hospital.
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