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Bushi Kempo

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  • Content Count

    9
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About Bushi Kempo

  • Rank
    Registered User
  • Birthday 02/10/1954

Personal Information

  • Location
    Dronfield Woodhouse
  • Interests
    JuJitsu, Climbing, Walking
  • Occupation
    Telecoms engineer
  1. I used to go out with a girl who lived on Douglas rd or Vale rd, she was called Dianne Wild, I cannot remember her parents name but she had a older sister called Barbera and a older brother called Ron. We would both been about thirteen at the time and we met at Burngreave school. Allways intrigued about Parkwood springs with its one way in and out, still work down that area sometimes.
  2. Hi Ron, Happy days, I remember steve and dave walmsley and all the guys mentioned by you. Tutsy
  3. Yep I remember Silverstones, the only place the DIYer could go in those days. Bought balsa wood there as a kid to make boats with. All tried and tested in Roewoods on one of the seven ponds. How about starting a directory of all the proper old Ironmongers type shops in the Sheffield area. The ones where you could still source a tin bath. Hutch mentions the one in Dronfield and that is one of the best still around. That is called Steels and is on Chesterfield road near Callywhite lane/ Green lane jnc. There is another in Eckington village centre but do not know the name of that one. I think Jennings is still at the bottom of Staniforth rd, Attercliffe end. I love the feet and inches Hutch, what about pounds and ounces.
  4. Nah den Double, I am 51, did we tread the same turf at the same time?. I Lived at 179 Grimesthorpe rd from 1954 to 1971, 120 Ellesmere rd 73 to 75ish and Abbeyfield rd which was my first house purchase, we were there for approx five years. Left Pitsmoor around 1980 to Woodhouse. Does Tutsy ring any bells. Do you remember the mad pavement cyclist. He use to live with his parents on the right hand side of Sutherland rd just below the jnc of Petre st. Below the old Methodist church, Boys Brigade underneath it. Anyway he used to fly out of the house on the bike which was one of your extra heavy duty wiggys gas pipe type, complete with umpteen mirrors,bells, lights and flags of all nations wafting in the wind. He did not care who was in the way, old biddies chatting or kids playing he would just steam through the lot. He wore in all weathers, a waterproof black flying helmet and long heavy gaberdine overcoat. Even with this handicap he would pump up and down the hills of Pitsmoor, England missed out on a potential Tour De France winner Im sure of it. The last memory I have of him I must have been around 14 and he was no young man but he was still carving up the pedestrians of Pismoor legs going fifty to dozen with that mad determined look on his face. Just one of Pismoors many colourfull old characters.
  5. The reason it was called Salmon Pastures is because there was an abundance of salmon to be caught there pre industrial revolution. Thank God they have now cleaned it up a bit now to the extent that you can see the bottom again in parts. Saw my first Kingfisher there just before christmas 2005, actualy plopped into the river and came out with a minnow or something small and fish like. Old photos show the river there with a fourty five degree natural bend with cliffs behind, Hence the cliffe in Attercliffe and beautifull open country side.
  6. I lived at 179 Grimesthorpe road across from Ashmores butchers shop, I was his Saturday lad, washing his van and Triumph herald soft top. Arther Robinson was the assistant butcher. I remember Woodheads sweet shop at the junction of roads opposite the main entrance to All Saints church. Below that you had Kays ladies hairdressers where I would pester mom for money every Saturday while she had her head cooked. Then the chemists, then the Spar shop and most important of all Gaggs chippy, extra scraps please. The shop on the corner of Petre st and Maxwell st belonged to Palfreymans, 18 months ago we bought our latest abode from Dave and Fay Cocker, Fay was the daughter of Mr Palfreyman and I went to school with Daves younger brother Michael. We had a great time remembering Pitsmoor and its characters. Across the road on the corner junction of Ellesmere rd and Petre st you had the Junk shop. Going back up Petre st on the right there was the fusty sweet shop and then on the corner of Sutherland rd and Petre st Fairbrothers tailors, I went to school with Janet Fairbrother.Directly across the road there was the wool shop Stringers, mum obviously got her wool from there and I got my black pumps. Further on Petre st there was a cobblers, wrapped your shoes in brown paper for collection and the smell was wonderfull. I am sure the cobbler wore a large built up shoe and had a motor bike and sidecar, his daughter went to school with us as well. Across the road at the bus stop to town was the little sweet shop where you got a quarter of midget gems in a triangle paper bag and in later years he would sell you a single ciggy in the same triangle bag complete with a match, underage of course. The Wembley, played down there a lot too. Good times you had to behave yourselves though or the parky would be out of his snug little office to rollock you. Sutherland rd baths, thank god for those. We spent hours and hours down there. Tony Wagstaff, John Timmins, Stu Butler, Tony Saccomando, Phillip Gill all good swimmers because of that sadist Mr Scott. I remember seeing him with his long bamboo pole with the loop on the end pushing some poor infortunate kid back away from the safety of the edge untill, it was obvious the kid was drowning, only then did he let them grab the pole to safety.I was determined this bully would not give me the same treatment so I learnt to swim with whoever would teach me in my time. You could say he got results and that was life then but I am sure some kids would disagree. ( see other comments in forum ). I could go on and on, which I probally have allready.
  7. Went to All saints infants and juniors, then Burngreave,1966. remember some of the teachers there,like, Mr Edlington, Eggy ( head ) Mr Guest science and PE. Mr Middlemass Tech Drawing, use to clonk you on the back of the head with a giant set square if you messed. Mr Whitham, French teacher, large white slipper fetish merchant for the botty. Mr Richards, Welsh guy taught English and tried to introduce rugby to the school.Girls were segregated from the boys in those days, but a little fondle in Burngreave cemetry at lunch times did not go amiss, with live girls I hasten to add. Trying to pee over the split outside toilet blocks onto the girls who would congregate at break times, giggling about whatever. Usually trying to get the projectory spot on could mean you drenched yourself or a mate. Should have paid more attention to the trigonometry lessons. Mr Hardwick was the metal work teacher and Mr Needham, Neddy Bubble ( short, bad breath ) the woodwork teacher. Use to troop down the jennel to the main gates of the cemetry to catch the special bus to Longley park playing field for footy or athletics. I chucked the discus for the school at one point.Didnt win anything just chucked it. If you go on friends reunited and put Burngreave school in there is a photo I posted of Mr Richards class, see if you can recognise anyone.its from around 1968 time.
  8. New to this, I think it was cycle racer who quoted Mr Osborne, ( Rick ) from Hinde House. Top english teacher and bloke. Right about the outdoor man. He found out I went caving in one of my essays and invited himself and Mr Goldstraw, ( girls do not go weak at the knees ) along. When he moved from his flat to a shared house with his family, myself and another pupil who also was in the same caving club helped him decorate. I remember his mini van, roll ups, shortness in stature and hairy face. Would love to see him again. This was around 1969. I only attended for a year, left at fifteen to earn some dosh to pay for the caving hobby. Did I mention the Odin Caving Club, anybody out there a former member.
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