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dave_the_m

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  1. At the risk or repeating myself... So rather then just endlessly repeating the fact that prior to verification there were invalid entries on the petition, can you instead make a coherent case as to why you think that fact is important?
  2. Anne, you have been told repeatedly that SCCs electoral services have verified the petition against the electoral register and found enough valid entries. The fact that there were other invalid entries added by people out of an abundance of enthusiasm, or malice, or whatever motivated them, seems irrelevant. So rather then just endlessly repeating the fact that prior to verification there were invalid entries on the petition, can you instead make a coherent case as to why you think that fact is important?
  3. Its called a private prosecution. Anyone can do it, and the RSPCA do it a lot (somewhat controversially). Personally I think that the ability to bring a private prosecution is a relic from the 18th century and should be abolished.
  4. Note that in local councils the wages that councillors are paid are referred to as "expenses". So if Julie Dore is getting "£30k in expenses", that doesn't mean she's been jetting off around the world, it means she's been paid a salary for doing a job. (Whether she's done the job well is of course a matter for political debate).
  5. At the time of the worldwide Credit Crunch, the UK's National debt was lower as a percentage of GDP than when Labour came into power.
  6. My morning commute takes 15 minutes door to door by car, or about 45 mins by buses, or 55 mins by foot. If buses were free, I'd probably still choose to drive.
  7. a quick Google search shows that M25 widening in 2010 cost £100M per Km, which scales to £70M for that 700m. The Parkway may well work out much cheaper, but it would likely be in the millions of pounds rather than thousands.
  8. What has Neil Kinnock having six pensions got to do with anything? People who have more than one job over their lifetime tend to accumulate multiple pensions, but that doesn't mean that they retire with six times as much money as is reasonable. It means each pension is only worth typically a sixth of full retirement value. Now you may wish to argue that EU civil service salaries and pensions are overly generous, but even if so I doubt that they compare with what people in senior management positions at large corporations get.
  9. I think the TV series is a lot better than the film - in part because 8 hours allows more of the book to be included. I also prefer the TV's Lyra.
  10. It was a Labour manifesto pledge to hold a binding second referendum. Don't get me wrong, I agree that the Tories have the votes and legal right to push the Withdrawal Bill though parliament. I'm am just sick of talk of "the Will of the People" which consisted of a non-binding referendum which was split roughly in thirds between Leave, Remain and Don't know/Don't Care, and where opinion polls have shown a consistent (if small) majority in favour of Remain for the last two years.
  11. And yet a majority of the voting public voted for parties that were in favour of Remain or a second referendum.
  12. We were, we are, and we will remain in a very weak negotiating position with the EU - and that hasn't been changed by the results of the General Election. As a worst-case fall-back position, the EU could close their borders with us and lose 4% of their export trade, while we lose 44% of ours. We simply have no leverage.
  13. In general terms it's a one-year transitional withdrawal agreement. For a year we continue paying the EU, obeying EU law etc, supposedly giving us time to negotiate a free trade (or whatever) deal with the EU, plus deals with the 40 other countries we used to have trade deals with by virtue of us being part of the EU. It also sets out arrangements for UK/EU people already residing in EU/UK. Finally it applies a big dollop of fudge to the fundamental problem that, while there will be customs and immigration border controls between UK and the EU, there will miraculously be no such controls when passing from RoI to Northern Ireland to GB and back. Or to put it another way, we're signing up to a one-year delayed hard Brexit, but with a few things resolved and the hope that some other things might get resolved over the course of the next year.
  14. Note also that a majority of the voting public voted for parties that were committed to Remain or to have a second referendum.
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