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derrek

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About derrek

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  • Location
    Harthill
  • Interests
    Local history
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    Retired
  1. Yes I hope more images may yet come to light. There is however a water colour illustration of 'Fidler's Field' and Charnock Hall farm in a book titled 'The Changing Face of Gleadless' by Pauline Shearstone. ISBN 0 9510362 4 6. This was originally painted by local artist, Cecil Higgins, from memory and not entirely accurate. Nevertheless its a most worthy attempt in the absence of any old photos. Pauline's books are a fabulous record of Gleadless if you can still obtain copies.
  2. The remains of a stretch of 'Fiddler's field' wall (so nicknamed after the farmer - Arnold Fiddler - who owned Charnock Hall Farm), can still be seen running alongside White Lane between the supermarket and the library. It's now only a remnant, being only a couple of foot high, made of thin slabs of black coal measure sandstone. I remember it being about six foot high when it was a field boundary and ran along White Lane to where the houses start, just before the tram stop. About half way along was a wide gate which opened on to a long strait drive which led directly up to Charnock Hall Farm. This divided Fidler's Field into two parts. The Azena ballroom (and also Arnold's retirement bungalow) now the supermarket, was built to the left of the drive, when the farm and land was sold off to build the Charnock housing estate in the 1950's & 60's. Fidler's field often had a dairy herd grazing in it. As kids we often picked mushrooms there. Can anyone else remember the well in front of the old cottages at the top of the field, the archway through to the barns, the milking parlour, the model aeroplane in the hall window and the turkeys?! ---------- Post added 04-10-2016 at 10:38 ---------- War Pig mentions an upright stone which stands in front of St.Peter's church on White Lane, and suggests that it came from Charnock Hall farm. I believe that it was actually 'rescued' from BASEGREEN FARM, that was demolished before the church was built on roughly the same site. At the laying of the foundation stone ceremony, local residents were invited the buy bricks in order to raise funds for the construction. We wrote our names on the bricks which the brick layers placed with the named faces on the cavity side when building the walls of the church. I wonder what St. Peter thinks of this hidden grafity!
  3. There were 2 'community' huts in Gleadless when the Town End and Charnock areas were still in Derbyshire in the 1950's. One was a black domed misson hut, which was an annex to St. Johns church at Ridgeway. C of E services and Sunday school classes were held there. It was situated on White Lane, roughly where the library was built later. It was also by an entrance to Fiddler's Field, which stretched up the slope to the old Charnock Hall farm. Farra's Fun fare came to this field once a year. You can still see part of the road side stone wall, now greatly reduced in height. The field and farm are now occupied by the medical centre, the pharmacy, the super market (ex Azena danse salon) and the houses behind. The misson hut disappeared when St. Peter's church was built further along White Lane. The second hut was on Charnock Hall Road, on the left at the top of the rise, when approaching from White Lane. This was sited on a paddock of land belonging to Charnock Hall farm. Scout and cub meetings were held there until the group move to the 'new' H.Q. on Gleadless Road, just past the Carlton Club. This hut may also have been used by other community groups, as well as the Scouts. When the hut was demolished a row of garages were built on the site, in turn to be replaced by housing. A footpath just below the hut ran past a short row of cottages, just before passing in front of Charnock Hall farm itself. The footpath is still there, but the land and farm have been developed for housing
  4. The 'nearby' bus service to Chesterfield which you refer to, actually runs through Killamarsh (which is in Derbyshire) and is over 2 miles away from Harthill. Yes there used to be a service through Harthill to Worksop which was only a daytime service and not at week-ends. You guessed right - it was withdrawn through lack of use. Getting buses to come through Harthill (and other small rural communities)is a constant problem. To transport folk to where they want to be and at times they want to go & return is uneconomical because of the 'dead' mileage & time it takes for buses to get here. Consequently only limited & inadequate services are provided, which are then shunned by the public. This only serves to accelerate the lack of use - it's a viscious downward spiral.
  5. Good comments Bilge. I live in Harthill, a small village, just in South Yorkshire. No hope of Supertram coming here!! But I like your point about local authorities working together to 'breakthrough' traditional transport boundaries. Most of our quite inadequate buses go to Rotherham or Crystal Peaks, but many folk would like to get to Chesterfield or Worksop - but of course South Yorkshire Transport executive can't get through the 'glass wall.' We can however (wilth careful scrutiny of timetables) sometimes link up with trains at Kiveton or the Supertram at Halfway - but its hardly a hop-on hop-off service. I hope there will be more thought given to bus-tram-train links, along the lines of the Killamarsh and Stocksbridge services. I could add to my original comment about the Herdings supertram spur extension and suggest it could continue to Dronfield!! I await the flack!
  6. Projects such as extending the supertram network will always be very expensive and would cause disruption. This has always been the case with civil engineering projects to do with transport. The original Victorian/Edwardian tram network was expensive & disruptive. So was Supertram. So will H.S.2 &3 if if that goes ahead. M1 widening - the list goes on.... BUT Supertram is clean, efficient and popular with folk who have access to it. I believe its now paying its way too. No smelly diesel fumes & what happens when the oil runs out? If we hadn't been forward thinking in the past we would still be on horse & cart or Shanksies pony.;)
  7. Get services to where people live seems like a sensible business plan
  8. It's such a long way between the White Lane stop the Birley one. A way through Base Green from Hollinsend with additional stops may have been a better option. Why not extend the Herdings link to Norton, Jordanthorpe & Lowedges areas?
  9. I'm one of Vernon's 'Blasts from the past'. I'm Derrek Leigh & palled around with Vernon in our teenage Gleadless years, spending many hours round his dad's piano. smoking 'Capstan full strength!' He introduced me to ice cream selling in Clumber Park & later got me lifts home after some Grease Band gigs in the band's van. I knew Pauline & Gres Earp too from those days, but doubt if they will remember me now. I could write a book on those times - Happy days! Would love to do catch-up with anyone interested? Please e-mail me at derrekleigh@talktalk.net Oh yes. How sad. R.I.P. Joe ---------- Post added 26-12-2014 at 11:24 ---------- Hi Vernon, Hope this reaches you. Would be great to do catch up after all these years, since we palled around together as teenagers in Gleadless. Please contact me at derrekleigh@talktalk.net or through Sheffield Forum. All the best. Derrek
  10. As a student I worked at the Norton Water Tower in the 1968 summer holidays on ground maintenance. Mainly cutting grass and hedges, but I did have to dust and sweep the staircase that went up to the viewing gallery. This was in preparation for the August bank holiday open days. There was also a lift. In the basement were powerful pumps which took water up to the tank at the top. I was told the water began its journey at the Redmires reservoirs and was fed through the system via the pumping station on Warminster Rd. to the water tower. I believe it was constructed in its high situation in order to provide the head of water needed for the 'new' housing estates at Gleadless Valley, Basegreen and Low Edges etc. I remember seeing a 'special' telephone in the basement. This was when the 'Cold War' between East & West was on and the phone was allegedly a hot line to Fylingdales early warning station. In the event of a nuclear attack, the valves were to be turned off and the water in the tanks isolated. ---------- Post added 02-02-2013 at 16:51 ---------- Also I was shown some print-outs of the water flow. One day the graph almost went off the scale. This was of a day in 1966 at about 3.45pm. It was half-time in the Owls v. Everton cup final at Wembley which was being televised. Lots of kettles being filled and toilets flushed I guess !
  11. Do you remember another pub on Hollinsend Road? It was part of a terraced row somewhere opposite the Hollin Bush. I think it had a beer only licence & couldn't serve spirits. It might have been called the Yew Tree. In the early 60's, I remember a couple of their dart players coming up to my local (New Inn at the bottom of Gleadless Common) who could go round the board on doubles in no time at all. It was a Yorkshire dart board with no treble or 25 ring. Do any pubs still have these boards in use nowadays? The New Inn was a great local then. The dart board was in the tap room on the left as you went in and much smaller than it is today. The beer was Tetleys bitter (like wine!) or a dark mild, served in dimpled mugs with handles. If you went in the best side (lounge) you had to pay a penny more (1d that was), and it was served in a sleeve glass, which snobby folk thought was superior! I sometimes called in at the Old 'Arrer' on White Lane, where you could get Tennants Amber (a light mild), bitter, and best bitter (Queens ?). When Whitbreads took over the brewery, we were introduced to Tankard YUK! We had another word for it beginning with W...... !
  12. Thanks Jackanne. You are right - the grocer was Beckets. The chemist further along was Madeleys (later Armstrongs). Mr. Madeley was a great sponsor of the Methodist Chapel. He had a daughter called Ann. We were part of a 'gang' that went to the youth club on Tuesdays and then to St.Peters youth club on Fridays - it must have been at about the same time as you - Tom Frith was one of the leaders and he had a daughter, Elaine who was also one of the 'gang'. The Chapel also had a Youth fellowship on a Sunday night, but you were expected to attend the evening service beforehand. This was very boring to some of us lads, but we put up with it 'cos there were girls to be 'chased' afterwards !
  13. In the 1950's , below Stan's the barbers, was Simpsons fruit and veg shop, which also had a fish-mongery at one time. This was on the corner of Briarfield Road and White Lane opposite the Post Office run by Artie Elliott. In the same row as Simpsons, was a hairdresser, a haberdashers, a butchers (Wrays?) and a Meadow grocers, which later became a D.I.Y shop. The Derbyshire boundary sign was across the road at this point, before it was moved to beyond the Old Harrow following Sheffield's take over of Gleadless Town End. The Sheffield & Ecclesall co-op (now Blockbuster) was next to the 101 & 102 bus terminus with its time clock. Next to Plumbs newsagents (I used to be a paper boy there in the late 50's) on the other side of the gennel, was a grocers shop (Bradleys ?), a radio/t.v. shop, and Madeley's chemist. Easthopes were the family who ran the Red Lion, and opposite (where the locked up toilets are now) was a large wooden shed used for motor repairs. Smithfield Road was unsurfaced then and was a hotchpot of houses, converted railway carriages and shacks, where people lived and pigs & poultry were kept. ---------- Post added 19-01-2013 at 23:44 ---------- Long before Blockbusters at Town End the building was the S & E co-op. In fact it was divided into two shops - the butchers and the grocers. As you went in, the dairy, bacon and cold meats counter was on your left and there was no self service then. Other groceries were on the right. I remember some things were still on ration and sugar was sold loose and scooped into blue bags. The assistants put your money in to a metal cup which was screwed into an overhead carrier and catapulted along a wire to the small cash office in the far corner of the room. Another wire came through a hole in the wall from the butchers next door. I can still remember my mum's co-op number. She used to send me to buy tokens to pay for our doorstep milk delivery. They were black in summer and red in winter, when the price went up 1d (old penny) a pint. ---------- Post added 19-01-2013 at 23:45 ---------- Long before Blockbusters at Town End the building was the S & E co-op. In fact it was divided into two shops - the butchers and the grocers. As you went in, the dairy, bacon and cold meats counter was on your left and there was no self service then. Other groceries were on the right. I remember some things were still on ration and sugar was sold loose and scooped into blue bags. The assistants put your money in to a metal cup which was screwed into an overhead carrier and catapulted along a wire to the small cash office in the far corner of the room. Another wire came through a hole in the wall from the butchers next door. I can still remember my mum's co-op number. She used to send me to buy tokens to pay for our doorstep milk delivery. They were black in summer and red in winter, when the price went up 1d (old penny) a pint.
  14. Yes. That would have been the Harthill Tup group. The Harthill version has been doing the rounds in its current form every year since 1973 or 4.
  15. I remember taking part in a survey of pubs still serving beer with traditional handpumps in the early 1970s. This resulted in the first beer guide for Sheffield and District branch of CAMRA. We could only find a handful - the fizzy keg and lager revolution was well under way and it was aweful stuff. It resulted in the loss of Wards, proper Stones, Tennants Queens, Shipstones & proper Barnsley Bitter - to name but a few. The brewers introduced cellar tanks and pressurised kegs and treated us to chemical beers such as Double Diamond, Tankard, Red Barrel etc. Fortunately CAMRA and drinker power has helped to stem the rot and there are now a fairly decent selection of locally produced real beers to be had in many pubs/bars in and around Sheffield
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