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andingmen

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  1. Like many, I'd never heard of this lady. I've now looked at some information about her past and experience. I suppose one positive note is that she will have some relatively important contacts within national government. However, two other areas do concern me: Firstly, her social media outlets seem to be just full of corporate speak, sound bytes and excessive froth. Secondly, and more ominously for Sheffield, she grew up in Doncaster. After the utterly ineffective and weak city leadership of recent years and with Dan Jarvis already positioning himself for whatever format the Sheffield City Region finally takes, I fear the worst for any chance of Sheffield itself to have any meaningful say in crucial and strategic decisions in the foreseeable future.
  2. It's actually called the Attercliffe Waterside project. More detail and comments can be found here on the Sheffield Metro City forum:- https://www.skyscrapercity.com/threads/attercliffe-waterside.2162710/
  3. There was some information regarding the latest position with this site on the SkyscraperMetro City thread here. See post 32. From about 20 days ago. https://www.skyscrapercity.com/threads/uos-social-sciences-building-4fl-u-c.2195082/page-2#post-168234420
  4. For all of those providing information, particularly for Andy C for his extremely comprehensive summaries, thank you so much. It's especially welcome at this time.
  5. Yesterday, I started a new thread on HS2, specifically about the visibility, or lack of, a figurehead to lead Sheffield through the next critical stage of decision making about HS phase 2 and NPR. The mods have now decided to integrate it into this wider HS2 thread (#26 above). The only voice I have heard so far is from Dan Jarvis, the current Mayor of SCR. His contempt for Sheffield is well known - indeed in the press release I read, he could not even bring himself to mention the city's name once. On the other hand, in fairness, it is the ONLY voice I have heard locally so far. While we continue to bicker and argue about past decisions, other regions are vociferous in pushing their cases for the next stages. Where is the voice of Sheffield itself? With this disastrous lack of leadership, there is a real danger that Sheffield, and by association, the rest of S. Yorks will be bypassed entirely, not only from HS2 but also NPR.
  6. Yes, I'm aware of the history, frustrations and arguments. Personally, I would have loved the "Victoria Through" proposal. But, we have what we have. My concern is that from here on, we may lose even that and miss out on Northern East-West connectivity because of this lack of leadership.
  7. I suspect you're being a little tongue in cheek, Jim- but that's exactly the type of high profile we've lacked on the national stage - with the proviso that our champion would support the cause....
  8. I've just been reading the various national news sites about the imminent announcement. What concerns me is that, during this whole saga, Sheffield's prominence has gradually declined to the extent that we are currently included on a spur only. In my view, this was partly due to the South Yorkshire in-fighting but mainly due to ineffective leadership and representation. With phase 2 also now being "reviewed" for possible savings and integration into the NPR proposals, which again seem to stress the Manchester- Leeds link only, my concern is that Sheffield's voice will be even weaker. Whether you agree or not with HS2, if Sheffield doesn't fight for its rightful share, others certainly will - to our loss. Who exactly is or will be our champion to fight for our share of the supposed benefits? Other areas have charismatic and powerful voices doing the lobbying Just who is ours??
  9. 1956 -61 for me. I certainly remember Fanny Fairbourne but not the pot leg! Other teachers I recall (apologies for any spelling errors): Mrs/Miss Burrell, Moseley, Mr Wiggett. Fellow classmates at various times: Ian Barber, Steven Everson , David Hutchinson, David Beal, Alan Bottomley, John Plews, Margaret Bown and her 3 siblings, Ann Brackenbury, Deborah Holmes, Lucy Wyatt, Tony Dyson, Peter Flint, Ian Ross. David? Allen, David?Platt, Graham Wilkinson, Ian Makinson, David Barnes, Philip ?? who lived on Wake Road....... Other snippets that just surface as I write.... The 4 houses, Hardwick (blue), Chatworth (yellow), Haddon (red), Welbeck (green). Collecting house points every Friday from the peg boards. Reception class using slate board and chalk. Ink wells/monitor, milk/ watery orange juice monitor - stair monitor. Boys' outside toilets at the bottom left of the playground and the obligatory competition. The old air raid shelters where we kept the coconut mats. The school plays in the upstairs hall. The swimming lessons at Heeley baths with the legendary Mr Wall, who seemed to teach every kid in south Sheffield forever. Let me go and think a little more.....
  10. I do not know Julie Dore personally. I have heard from people who have met her, that she is a sincere lady who genuinely tries to do what she considered best for the city. However, what she has never been is a true leader in the full sense of the word- with drive and charisma. At a time when Sheffield has been crying out for dynamic, determined and effective leadership, it has been sorely missing. Regionally, Sheffield's voice is being swamped more and more by the Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Hull axis and nationally it is often effectively ignored. More and more we are being sidelined because we have not had an effective and powerful champion. The HS2 debate, Channel 4 HQ, and now, critically, the NPR transport strategy are just some examples where we have been, and continue to be seen as, increasingly irrelevant. Not all of this can be laid solely at her door of course and her predecessors were little if no better but a true leader could have done so much more to champion our cause.
  11. Ah, canteens indeed! For a short while, I was an apprentice at Laycock’s on Archer Road in the mid-60’s. At lunch time every work day, I just had a plate of chips with gravy and brown sauce, because the chips were cheap and the other two were free! After that I joined the then Post Office Telephones and spent some wonderful times as an apprentice maintenance engineer visiting loads of houses, shops, offices and factories around the S. Yorks and N. Derbys/Notts areas. Many of the steel works did indeed have excellent canteens but I seem to remember the pits had the best basic stuff whilst the RAF stations had the best quality. Ironically, a few years later, I revisited Laycock’s as a fully fledged telephone engineer and had to use the new-fangled vending machines. The worst cup of tea I’ve ever had in my life. I still shudder at the memory of the taste…. Even later, in the mid 70’s, I ended up as a construction engineer in Eldon House telephone exchange, eating dripping sandwiches and spam dips from their canteen. Nowt but the best food for me!
  12. Hello, first of all, it's great to hear of the FoBEW. Keep up the good work. Yes, the police box was the Tardis type - similar to the one still outside Town Hall - at least in my memory. I think it was green and cream - or maybe dark blue and cream. It was set in the wall of the woods somewhere between the top of Union Road and, I think, Edgehill road. When I visited again a couple of years ago, I think I could still make out where the 8-foot or so gap had been filled in with with not quite the same stonework. In any event, if you look along the back section of that wall, I think you can still see evidence of where the concrete base was. As for other memories... well lots. My dad had an allotment in the upper part towards Chelsea park - now overgrown. In addition, the cottage/house at the bottom of Archer Lane, where the service track is for the Allotment Society hut is, was a little "corner" shop with the inevitable little old lady serving. And, just opposite that, where there is now a relatively new house, was spare land. On here was an abandoned wreck of a car - probably a collectors item now - where we would play for hours and in our imagination,take turns driving the crew to all the exotic places in the world - even as far as Skeggy! As a later poster has said, it's funny how the memory gets triggered by a small thing, as things come back from years ago. I'll be back in Sheffield in mid-January and would be happy to meet up and see how your work is prgressing. And maybe get a chance to tell you about the other "goings on", innocent and otherwise less so, which I alluded to in my previous post ---------- Post added 30-11-2016 at 02:01 ---------- I’m pretty sure many others will already know this, but I’ve done a bit more on-line digging, trying to pin-point exactly where the police box was on Brincliffe Edge. As you do, I digressed and stumbled across some other snippets. One of which was this memoirs website of David Ludlam: (not sure if I’ve embedded the link thingy properly). http://youle.info/history-blog/nether-edge-grammar/recollections/david-ludlam-1941-46/ There are a couple of paragraphs at the beginning describing his walk to school through that very area. Amongst other things he mentions the sweet shop on Archer Lane , the reason for the spare land opposite and the location of the police box. Also, I followed up the other thread about the Sheffield History map website being back on-line (by the way, what a great resource) and had a look at the 1950’s map of Brincliffe. Although it tantalisingly just misses out the location of the police box, it shows a host of other detail of which I certainly was not aware as a lad. For example, it shows all the other quarry workings nearby and the refuse dumps at the end of Chelsea road. If only I’d known, I could have explored even more! ---------- Post added 30-11-2016 at 05:02 ---------- I’m pretty sure many others will already know this, but I’ve done a bit more on-line digging, trying to pin-point exactly where the police box was on Brincliffe Edge. As you do, I digressed and stumbled across some other snippets. One of which was this memoirs website of David Ludlam: (not sure if I’ve embedded the link thingy properly). http://youle.info/history-blog/nethe...udlam-1941-46/ There are a couple of paragraphs at the beginning describing his walk to school through that very area. Amongst other things he mentions the sweet shop on Archer Lane , the reason for the spare land opposite and the location of the police box. Also, I followed up the other thread about the Sheffield History map website being back on-line (by the way, what a great resource) and had a look at the 1950’s map of Brincliffe. Although it tantalisingly just misses out the location of the police box, it shows a host of other detail of which I certainly was not aware as a lad. For example, it shows all the other quarry workings nearby and the refuse dumps at the end of Chelsea road. If only I’d known, I could have explored even more!
  13. Like others on here, I too spent many hours playing in and around the Brincliffe area in the late fifties/early sixties. As interlopers, our “crew”, who all lived in the rougher Glen/Gatefield Road area, would walk up through the posher end of Sandford Grove Road , past the stone walled circular roundabout with the tree on the middle at the junction and spent hours and hours, mainly in what we all called Needham’s Fields – the sloping land between Bannerdale Road and Brincliffe edge. We’d grass sledge down the grassy slope up behind the Allotment office shed using the usual cardboard box as a sledge or climb the trees and carve the name of our gang high up in the bark. Our secret den was in a tree just behind where the police box used to be set in the wall beside the woods along Brincliffe Edge We’d play hide and seek in the allotments and have a drink of sweet Sheffield tap water from the many outlets when they still used to have the top on because, of course, it was always sunny and hot. I also remember tadpole-ing in the “lake” in the valley at the bottom although I seem to recall it was more of a pond by the time I was around. It was just as the ground was being prepared for building of the houses and estate on the upper half of Bannerdale Road –early sixties? At that time the existing houses stopped somewhere around where the snicket now is up to the allotments. If we wanted gentler pursuits we’d push on up and into Chelsea park and, in Autumn, go conkering, in winter, sledging ( although Meersbrook park was still the place to play the true dare devil)or in other seasons play on our bikes and the bumps and hillocks or play footy on the only patch of reasonably flat grass in the top corner, overlooked by what we called Brincliffe Towers. Only very occasional did we venture down into the quarry in the other top corner because we all thought it was too spooky and dark. Many, many other memories in and around Chelsea park and “Needhams’ Fields” - mostly fond, some funny, some sad, some shameful and the odd one or two disturbing, but overall a wonderful, wonderful childhood.
  14. I grew up as a child on Gatefield Road, off Abbeydale Road in the fifties/early sixties. In the row of shops between the bottom of Gatefield Road and Marden Road, there was a newsagents - I believe it was called Yeadon's. On one side of the shop, they had a small private lending library which my parents used to use regularly. I usually had the task of running errands to fetch my dad his 10 Park Drive (none of this underage stuff in those days) and my mum her quarter of liquorice torpedoes.. Sometimes, I'd take their books back, The shop always seemed very dark and miserable to me. If I'm remembering correctly, they called it the Abbeydale Lending Library. The reason I know this is because, many years later, while clearing out one of my older brother's belongings, I found a borrowed book with that name stamped inside. The shop owners had been long gone by then, so the family guilt feeling was significantly less! After they shut, I graduated to the much grander Highfields library - "Just William" books being my staple reading for several years after.
  15. I confess that resurrecting this thread is a blatant attempt to counter the negativity of the ugly buildings thread. However I’ve been thinking more about this topic and now suggest a whole cluster of beautiful buildings in the Kenwood/Nether Edge area. As a lad, a good few years ago now, I used to deliver the Readers’ Digest to many of these houses. I was always stunned by the elegance and size of many of the residences, with their stone exteriors, huge rooms and vast gardens. They just exuded wealth and grandeur to a young lad like me. I always dreamt that one day I might be in a position to own one. Most of these houses are still here. Many are now offices or converted into flats. I’m still dreaming…
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