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dizzy_chick

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About dizzy_chick

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  1. I'm sorry you felt that way about my post. It wasn't intended to come across in that way. My advice was to hopefully enable the person who is reflecting on their relationship to have a way of protecting themselves (and potentially any children), if they choose to remain with that person. it is of course the OP's decision to remain in that relationship but my post was trying to suggest that the OP will need support with that on a practical level. My former partner spent all of our money on weed, and managed to get us evicted from our home because of it.
  2. My former in-laws were both (functioning-ish) alcoholics for many years. A close friend was married to an alcoholic who now is experiencing considerable health impacts due to the long term effects of drinking heavily. Whatever you decide to do, and your circumstances will have to inform this, will make it a difficult decision. There are support organisations out there who may be able to support you while you are in this relationship. There is support out there for your partner. If you do decide to remain in this relationship, and the drinking does continue, consider taking steps to protect yourself financially and practically. For example, if you are living together, try and maintain some income to yourself or have a small amount of money saved away which only you can access (a 'running away fund' and the Sheffield Credit Union could be useful for this). if you are not living together, and can afford to continue to live separately, consider keeping this arrangement. Try and maintain your links with friends and family, you will need their support. Try and make sure you have a life outside and separate to the relationship. For example, continue to go to social groups, the gym or other fitness activities, or other hobbies. All of these will help to support you through this relationship.
  3. using the above, the family should be able to appeal. OP, has this happened in sheffield?? wherever the family are, they need to find a local housing advice service, who understand the local allocations policy.
  4. ^^ Don't forget, private renting is more expensive and a lot less secure then a Council tenancy. Start a diary of the incidents, and speak to the other tenants in the block to see if they are experiencing the same from her. Speak to the Housing Officer about a mutual exchange as well. Involve your local Councillor. Good luck.
  5. Really? When I was a tenant, I found it very easy to work out the rent statements and if I was in arrears.
  6. My parents live down south, so it'll be a different CCG and funding arrangements and procurement arrangements for the NHS provider. My dad went private for a hearing aid, and despite numerous visits to the provider, could not get the devices to work properly. He went via the NHS route, and got similar Siemans hearing aids as supplied privately, and seems happier with them. I'm not sure that the hearing aids are any better, or if his expectations of what the hearing aids can do is more realistic. He still struggles with hearing some speech and turns them off at times.
  7. I pay a bit in every month. It used to be my 'running away' fund, as my former partner had a habit of spending every penny I earnt, but that's in another life! It's now quite a reasonable amount, and it gets a bit of a dividend every year.
  8. Has he had an assessment from the Local Authority Social Care? The first step is to contact Adult Social Care and ask for an assessment. There's more information here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/care-act-2014-part-1-factsheets/care-act-factsheets That assessment is for funding for his social care needs. From the information given, it sounds as though he has certainly got social care needs, such as the support with eating and getting around the home. Has he ever had any support from a speech & language therapist? The Council may be able to advise on equipment. An OT can come and assess him to see if any equipment or adaptations could help. Funding from Social Care is subject to a financial assessment of his income and any savings. I assume he lives in Sheffield. The adult social care team can be contacted on: 2734908. There's some online help here: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/content/sheffield/home/social-care/independent-safe-well.html He may have to wait for an assessment. It'll be worth him having someone to advocate on his behalf. The Clinical Commissioning team (CCG) manage the Continuing Health Care funding, which is NHS money. The CCG team will assess him to determine whether he has eligible health needs. More information is here: http://www.sheffieldccg.nhs.uk/Your-Health/continuing-healthcare.htm
  9. Which Housing Association is it? Housing Associations use a different type of tenancy, which has different grounds for ending it. There's some further advice on here: https://england.shelter.org.uk/housing_advice/council_housing_association
  10. Hello. I'm not an expert, and these are really complex issues. Hopefully this will help. Firstly, some questions: Are you currently receiving support funded by the s117 aftercare? Have you had a review of the care plan recently? If you weren't receiving the s117 aftercare, how would you fund any support? I assume you have your own property? How would you fund a property in Sheffield? if you will be relying on Housing Benefit to pay the rent, you may find it diffult to secure a private rented tenancy in Sheffield. As far as I know, the s117 aftercare can only be ended by a professional (https://www.rethink.org/living-with-mental-illness/mental-health-laws/section-117-aftercare/ending-s117). If you were not receiving the s117, would you need social care funding to pay for support? If you wanted to be assessed for social care funding, you would need to approach your Local Authority's Adult Social Care department and ask them for an assessment. This would probably be a Care Act assessment. After the assessment, if you met the criteria, you would be able to use funds to pay for some support. If you want to try and get NHS funding to pay for support, you will need to go through that process. There are some specialist services in Sheffield. Some of them will be run as voluntary groups. Some of the agencies will be funded by people paying for their services, or using Direct Payments. My advice is to use the advocate to support you working with the professional who is overseeing your care plan. See if you can improve things that way. Alternatively, ask about moving with the existing s117 aftercare, but this is likely to be a complex process. An advocate may be able to advise if there are any other ways of getting funds for ongoing support.
  11. I've had a few recent ear piercings at Blue Banana in town (tragus and rim). All went well. Hope you find somewhere suitable.
  12. The Council has a complaints procedure: https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/home/your-city-council/make-complaint If you are not happy with the initial response, you can ask for it to reviewed. Ultimately, you can go to the Local Government Ombudsman (http://www.lgo.org.uk/make-a-complaint), but before you can do this you have to had exhausted the Council's complaints process. Have you tried your local Councillor? You can find out who they are here: http://democracy.sheffield.gov.uk/mgMemberIndex.aspx?bcr=1. Or your MP?
  13. It's this. I assume it's a SCC or a Housing Association property? When you sign for the property, ask the housing officer to work out how much you will have to pay.
  14. I always think it's because they don't really want to! There are numerous issues which play a part in the lack of housebuilding: Government policy & support, availability of the land in the right location, whether the housing development will stack up financially for the developer, Local Authorities attitude to house building..
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