View Full Version : Gluten free recipes


*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 11:35
I am struggling with recipe's, most sauces have gluten in them.

I am living on gluten free pasta, rice and chicken so far!

:help:

Dark Moomin
28-07-2009, 12:11
well, what sort of meals do you like? There are probably ways of making most things gluten free

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 12:12
There isn't much I won't try once.

Not a fan of spices really but thats about it

Dark Moomin
28-07-2009, 12:17
hmmm, not sure I know of any really good recipes then - can't you make normal sauces with gluten free flour?

And most tomato based things would be fine I guess, goulash, chilli, bolognese...

Sorry never resally looked at gluten free recipes as such, but I am quite good at working out how to make a certain thing without something - if you get what I mean!

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 12:18
I am going to try some sauces from scratch and see how it goes.

Soups are my biggest upset - they all have flour in!

Dark Moomin
28-07-2009, 13:51
I am going to try some sauces from scratch and see how it goes.

Soups are my biggest upset - they all have flour in!

Ah, well that I can help with!

I know you will struggle without paying through the nose for premade sauces and soups and things.

Hwoever if you make a lentil based, potato based or bean based soup they will virtually self thicken.

If you make a soup with beans in you can just crush up some of the beans at the end of the cooking time and they will thicken the soup up.
Also I find that alot of home made soups in general are thick enough without adding flours to thicken it.

Delia has alot of soup recipes online if you google for them.

Is corn flour gluten free?

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 13:56
I can't have Barley Wheat or Rye - so anything else is fair game.

I've never been one for making things myself so its a big shock to me!

Schiann
28-07-2009, 14:25
Don't be afraid of flours in general. There are lots of gluten-free varieties out there to experiment with. :)

Rice flour, gram flour, and cornflour are all gluten-free and don't require any trips to specialty shops.

You might have a look around this site for recipes and gluten-free ingredients lists:
http://www.wheat-free.org/

Dark Moomin
28-07-2009, 15:14
for general cooking, as I understand it you can just replace the flour in the recipe with a gluten free varient.

I'm not sure I'd want to use rice flour, corn flour or gram flour in large quantities for desserts and the like though. There are gluten free 'normal' flours out there, but again I'm not certain how well they work for baking.

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 15:14
Trial and error I guess

Schiann
28-07-2009, 15:22
Gram flour can be used for things like baking, while rice flour and cornflour are best used as thickening agents.

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 15:23
I will have to look into these, and try them all out. Only way to know for sure is to have a go I guess!

medusa
28-07-2009, 15:23
Sauces that are thickened with flour need the flour to have gluten in it- that's what is the thickening agent.

The big alternative to thickening sauces with a flour roux is to use cornflour slaked in a little water. It works with all sorts of things, from stir fry sauces to cheese sauce and has a knock on advantage that it's also much lower fat than the standard flour version.

For normal recipes I'd use Dove House flour as your alternative for baking and the like- it's really quite a handy and palatable alternative, although a bit heavy compared to standard wheat flour so you'll have to add an extra spoon of baking powder to lighten it up.

For dumplings a combination of rice flour, vegetable suet and baking powder works really well.

Dark Moomin
28-07-2009, 15:24
Gram flour can be used for things like baking, while rice flour and cornflour are best used as thickening agents.

I have baked with gram flour - the texture was OK but there was a funny aftertaste! not recommended by me for sweet things, but thinking about it a savoury pastry with it would be good.

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 15:26
Never heard of Dove house flour before, I have seen that Tesco etc have rice flour in the free from sections though.

medusa
28-07-2009, 15:30
Sorry, I got the name wrong, it's Dove Farm (http://www.dovesfarm.co.uk/index.html).

I've used most of their gluten free flours with success- their mixes which are proper baking flours are much less heavy than using any of the individual flours by themselves.

Do bear in mind that you'll probably need to add more baking powder and more moisture in your recipes than with wheat flour though- how much is learned through practice.

EDIT- buckwheat may be a naturally gluten free relative to normal wheat, but don't try substituting it without adding other things too. It's produces bread which is the heaviest substance known to man, which will break your teeth on the crust too ;)

Schiann
28-07-2009, 15:33
I have baked with gram flour - the texture was OK but there was a funny aftertaste! not recommended by me for sweet things, but thinking about it a savoury pastry with it would be good.

I've used gram flour in sweet breads with dates, figs, and raisins, but I don't think I would recommend it for general use (alone, anyway), either.

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 15:34
I wonder if there's a book on this kind of stuff, it seems very confusing :help:

(Don't worry its easily done :hihi:)

Schiann
28-07-2009, 15:38
There are lots of websites and books out there on gluten-free cooking. I found this one, which has a load of helpful tips/hints :)

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~coeliac/cook.html

medusa
28-07-2009, 15:40
My sister has a fabulous cookbook, but I don't think it's in press any more. It's got dozens of alternatives to cover all sorts of dietary issues.

If you can get a copy it will serve you very well.

http://www.foodcanmakeyouill.co.uk/library/bookreviews/foodwatch.html

EDIT- cancel what I've just said- Amazon have it.

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 15:43
Wicked, I will have to invest in one, thanks Meds!

Dark Moomin
28-07-2009, 15:58
I've used gram flour in sweet breads with dates, figs, and raisins, but I don't think I would recommend it for general use (alone, anyway), either.

hmm, actually with some nice warm spices I can see how that would work well. Do you just use it like wheat flour with yeast when making your breads?

Sorry Peaches - didn't mean to hijack!

*Peaches*
28-07-2009, 15:59
no I don't mind at all you go for it its all experience

Schiann
28-07-2009, 17:53
Gram flour doesn't rise well, even with yeast. I've only ever used it in quickbreads (more or less cakes ;) )

Ginger_Kitty
28-07-2009, 21:42
For dumplings a combination of rice flour, vegetable suet and baking powder works really well.

Only if you can find gluten free suet (easier said than done!) and gluten free baking powder.


Peaches, as you probably know, I've been gluten free for several years now, no coeliac disease, just stupidly gluten intolerant!

Its all a learning curve really, pastry is a beggar to make GF, so look in sainsbury's freezer section, they also have sausage rolls, chicken kievs, pizza etc in there too, very useful for the slack days ;)

oh and fish fingers... mmm... *drool*

For cakes, I use a normal 4oz recipe (4oz flour, 4oz butter, 4oz sugar & 2 eggs) but substitute the normal flour for doves farm generic GF flour and GF baking powder.

For sauces I do often cheat and buy ready made ones, if you spend time when you are shopping and read all the labels then you'll find a reasonable few that are GF, I use a fair few curries, chinese and other sauces when I know which ones to buy.

As for soups... erm.. you're pretty much stuck with tomato, though i did recently find a couple of tesco cartoned fresh soups in chicken flavour that I could eat :)

Oooh, Genius bread can be found in Tesco, its pretty good considering...

erm...

Phil Vickery has a new GF cookbook out, I don't know how good it is, but it might be worth a look :)

Oh and be careful with Oats, some people react to them, some don't.

If you want any more info/help, I'll do what i can :)

Em
xx

Schiann
29-07-2009, 00:08
Gluten-free baking powder:

1 part baking soda
2 parts cream of tartar
1 part cornflour, potato flour, or rice flour

Viola :)

Dark Moomin
29-07-2009, 08:28
Apparently the only baking powder Sainsbury's do now is gluten free - so its not marked up and is just with the normal baking stuff.

A friend who has just opened a cafe and working with the coeliac society on their gluten free range told me, so I fweel its a fairly trustworth source!

*Peaches*
29-07-2009, 11:00
Thanks GK, much appreciated!

I'm not a coeliac I am just intollerant too!

jamesons
29-07-2009, 11:11
If you like cakes rice flour and ground almonds are nice together - dont know measurements sorry. If you like chinese I have found if you ask what hasnt wheat in it they are usually very accommodating. If your in town there is a restaurant off fargate called 22a who do a gorgeous range of gluten free cakes.

steelerman
09-08-2009, 16:07
try waitrose fantastic selection of gluten free products,(morrisons also not bad),you can also buy gluten free beers at waitrose. I've been gluten free since 2000 any help you need just send me a message

*Peaches*
10-08-2009, 10:34
I'm a memeber of readitswapit.com and I've just got a swap of a gluten free recipe book! I'll let you all know if its any good

steelerman
12-08-2009, 19:05
thanx for that, always looking for new recipes

blue-kat
17-08-2009, 18:59
I am going to try some sauces from scratch and see how it goes.

Soups are my biggest upset - they all have flour in!

check out a brand called LOOK WHAT WE FOUND they do gluten free ready mades.
http://www.lookwhatwefound.co.uk/gluten-free.html
Sains tinned cream of tom soup doesn't have flour in.

make soup at home - flour not necessary mostly.
I've heard it's possible to use a couple of tablespoon of pudding rice to add nick thick creamy texture. I've not tried it yet, but guess it would need a good long simmering.

*Peaches*
08-11-2009, 18:06
I use potato in most recipe's as a thickener :)

chrispin2
10-11-2009, 13:04
Has anyone tried Orgran "Gluten free Gluten"?

It's an additive for gluten free flour that is meant to improve its "behaviour" in cakes and pastries and such.

It was recommended to me by a gluten-free friend and I'm trying to get some on the shelves at Beanies but haven't actually tried it myself yet.

http://www.orgran.com/dmdocuments/what_is_gfg.pdf

*Peaches*
10-11-2009, 13:16
OMG I just checked your link and I never even knew your shop existed! Its a shame I'm in Doncaster otherwise I'd have been straight over!

chrispin2
10-11-2009, 16:56
Come over anytime, Peaches, you'd be very welcome open 9.00am-8.00pm during the week, until 6.00pm on Saturdays and 11.00 - 4.00 on Sundays... We've got loads of gluten free products.

I've posted a link on another thread (Beanies Recipe File)to our facebook group this is our facebook page - subtle difference! - do join us if you are a facebook user.

beanies wholefoods on facebook (http://companies.to/beanieswholefoods/)

*Peaches*
10-11-2009, 17:15
Brilliant, will do!

mrs grissom
14-11-2009, 21:35
I like to make cakes that are gluten and dairy free. You use ground almonds instead of flour and a boiled ,pureed orange instead of the butter. Sounds wierd but is just yummy ! my favourite is "orange and green tea loaf"

3 medium eggs
125grms ground almonds
125grms castor sugar
1 tsp green tea leaves
1 tbsp gluten free baking powder
1 large orange(boiled till soft, cooled then pureed)


Beat eggs in a bowl ,then add orange puree and rest of ingredients. Mix well then pour into a lined loaf tin. Cook at gas 4/ 180 C/160 fan for 45-55 mins til skewer comes out clean. Leave to cool for 15 mins. Yummy.

blue-kat
15-11-2009, 20:40
intriguing recipe !

can you explain about boiling the orange please:
do you mean a peeled orange?
how much water? I'm imaging the orange breaking down into sloppy soup:gag:

I'm considering trying your recipe with lady grey tea (as I don't have green tea, and it's quite citrusy).

speaking of different cake recipes, do you perchance have any recipes with pureed prunes?
I gather than they can be used to add richness, so less fat and sugar, and still a moist sweet deep-flavoured cake. some GF recipes seem heavy on butter and sugar, presumably to mask the dry texture of GF flours.

thanks :)

blue-kat
16-11-2009, 10:04
APRICOT and ALMOND MACAROONS

rice paper
100g caster sugar
125g ground almonds
15g plain flour (i'm going to try gluten free or rice flour)
2 egg whites
vanilla extract
100g Bonne maman apricot conserve
15g flaked almonds

oven 170 degrees(150 fan gas m 3)
line baking trays with rice paper
mix sugar, ground almonds and flour in bowl
in another bowls beat egg whites with vanilla and 50g of the jam
stir into almond mix
spoon teaspoons of the mix onto the rice paper
spoon small dollops of the remaining jam into the centre of each macaroon and decorate with flaked almonds.
bake for 12-15 mins until lightly golden at edges.
cool and carefully tear away excess rice paper at edge of each macaroon

mrs grissom
16-11-2009, 23:07
intriguing recipe !







soup:gag:

I'm considering trying your recipe with lady grey tea (as I don't have green tea, and it's quite citrusy).

wspeaking of different cake recipes, do you perchance have any recipes with pureed prunes?
I gather than they can be used to add richness, so less fat and sugar, and still a moist sweet deep-flavoured cake. some GF recipes seem heavy on butter and sugar, presumably to mask the dry texture of GF flours.

thanks :)

Hi bluekat You just use a medium size orange, wash well but don't peel then
put it in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook till tender. Drain and allow to cool, then put the whole orange in a blender and puree. The result is a lovely moist cake yum!I think your idea of using Lady Grey would work well, I use a good quality jasmine tea that has the flowers in it and its lovely. this recipe is one of Ching-He Huang's who does lovely modern Chinese recipes and Nigella Lawson does a fantastic chocolate orange cake using the same method. That one has nutella in it so not good for dairy free but it is very, very naughty so I sometimes allow myself a big slice for a treat:hihi:
Sorry, haven't used the pureed prunes method but it sounds like it would work well so will be doing some research on that this weekend (bang goes the diet):hihi:

blue-kat
19-11-2009, 23:53
Hi Mrs G
thanks for explaining - will give it a go.
I have ordered Ching-He Huang's books from the lib, I rarely eat Chinese food because of the soy sauce (wheat)
although apparently Clearspring Tamari is wheat free, not sure if it's GF.

Nigella recipe
http://www.nigella.com/recipe/recipe_detail.aspx?rid=239

I made something similar with macadamia nuts, and used coffee instead of liqueur. very rich ! not an everyday cake !




recipe is one of Ching-He Huang's who does lovely modern Chinese recipes and Nigella Lawson does a fantastic chocolate orange cake using the same method. That one has nutella in it so not good for dairy free but it is very, very naughty so I sometimes allow myself a big slice for a treat:hihi:
Sorry, haven't used the pureed prunes method but it sounds like it would work well so will be doing some research on that this weekend (bang goes the diet):hihi:

komal
20-02-2010, 15:57
heres my recipe for gluten and sugar free buns - its on my food blog but don't worry theres no adverts or anything like that
here (http://girlwhoatetheworld.blogspot.com/2010/02/gluten-and-sugar-free-elderflower-and.html)

mikebarton
20-02-2010, 20:41
Hi Mrs G
thanks for explaining - will give it a go.
I have ordered Ching-He Huang's books from the lib, I rarely eat Chinese food because of the soy sauce (wheat)
although apparently Clearspring Tamari is wheat free, not sure if it's GF.

Nigella recipe
http://www.nigella.com/recipe/recipe_detail.aspx?rid=239

I made something similar with macadamia nuts, and used coffee instead of liqueur. very rich ! not an everyday cake !

The Clearingspring Tamari is wheat and gluten free, it really isnt that nice though. Waitrose do a really good Wheat Free Soy Sauce though, id rate it against original stuff.

komal
02-03-2010, 21:28
did anyone look at my recipe?

BJan
15-01-2011, 08:15
did anyone look at my recipe?

I have, and I've saved the link - it looks delicious thanks :)

rosaespanola
15-01-2011, 15:17
Some tips:
1. For baking, you'll get the best results if you add a teaspoon of xanthan gum to the gluten free flour mix. I use the Dove Farm flour which is sold in most supermarkets and comes in plain or self raising, and the xanthan gum is also sold in supermarkets. ) Without it, the GF flour seems to give cakes etc a powdery texture that isn't very nice, but the xanthan gum makes it impossible to tell that something was made with GF flour. I just make non-GF cake recipes and substitute the flour for GF flour - you can't tell the difference at all!
2. For sauces, the easiest way to make a cheese sauce for example is to start off by mixing cornflour with a bit of cold milk/water to make a paste, then adding as much more liquid as you need and heating it up. I do that even if the sauce doesn't need to be GF. Just make sure you don't try to stir cornflour into a lot of liquid/into hot liquid, as it will just go lumpy - always make it into a paste wtih a cold liquid before adding it.
3. The Works bookshop in Meadowhall & on the Moor had Phil Vickery's GF cookbook for about 6 recently - we have it and it's pretty good. It has a good variety of savoury & sweet things in it.

Good luck with all your cooking experiments - one thing about needing to eat GF is that you quickly realise it's a lot easier to learn how to cook than to try and find ready-made things that are GF!

BJan
15-01-2011, 15:22
Some tips:
1. For baking, you'll get the best results if you add a teaspoon of xanthan gum to the gluten free flour mix. I use the Dove Farm flour which is sold in most supermarkets and comes in plain or self raising, and the xanthan gum is also sold in supermarkets. ) Without it, the GF flour seems to give cakes etc a powdery texture that isn't very nice, but the xanthan gum makes it impossible to tell that something was made with GF flour. I just make non-GF cake recipes and substitute the flour for GF flour - you can't tell the difference at all!...


Thanks for the tips rosaespanola - this is probably a silly question, but would you also recommend using the xanthan gum for making pastry? I'm used to buying ready rolled :hihi:

rosaespanola
15-01-2011, 15:23
Also, a recipe for Nigella's clementine cake, which I think is the one people were referring to above - I spread chocolate on the top and it tastes exactly like eating a jaffa cake!
http://www.nigella.com/recipes/view/clementine-cake-2483

I made it recently for my cousin's daughter, who is coeliac and so sensitive to gluten that they can't even have anything with gluten in the house in case it accidentally touches something she eats, and she was so ridiculously happy to have a really tasty cake that was GF without having to have anything special done to it. It makes her really sad to have to have her own separate things to everyone else, it's like a constant reminder that she's different and not as healthy as other people.

rosaespanola
15-01-2011, 15:25
Thanks for the tips rosaespanola - this is probably a silly question, but would you also recommend using the xanthan gum for making pastry? I'm used to buying ready rolled :hihi:

Not a silly question at all! I've never yet managed GF pastry successfully, even with xanthan gum - it does make it a bit easier, but it's still far too crumbly to roll. I tend to just press it into the base of pie tins and things rather than rolling it out, it's not ideal and you obviously can't make pasties or anything like that, but it's better than nothing.

rosaespanola
15-01-2011, 15:29
As for soups... erm.. you're pretty much stuck with tomato, though i did recently find a couple of tesco cartoned fresh soups in chicken flavour that I could eat :)xx

I think most of the fresh soups in cartons are GF (unless they've got pasta or something in them, obviously!). The New Covent Garden ones are particularly fantastic, here's a link to lists of their soups which are suitable for special diets http://www.newcoventgardenfood.com/site/special_diet.asp

They're fairly expensive but supermarkets often have them on special offer so I keep a look out for them and then buy a load, they freeze well so I just keep them in the freezer and take them out when I need them.

roxiflydog
17-01-2011, 14:51
My friend is gluten free and when she is coming round I make pastry with Dove Farm flour it can be harder than other wheat flour pastry so add an egg to it. To roll it out use 2 sheets of greaseproof paper as it crack's easily. Dove Farm works well as a substitute for flour in soups and is better than flour for making REAL gravy.

BJan
17-01-2011, 20:24
I think most of the fresh soups in cartons are GF (unless they've got pasta or something in them, obviously!). The New Covent Garden ones are particularly fantastic, here's a link to lists of their soups which are suitable for special diets http://www.newcoventgardenfood.com/site/special_diet.asp

They're fairly expensive but supermarkets often have them on special offer so I keep a look out for them and then buy a load, they freeze well so I just keep them in the freezer and take them out when I need them.

Great - my favourite is their ham and pea soup and I see it is on the list! :)

Not a silly question at all! I've never yet managed GF pastry successfully, even with xanthan gum - it does make it a bit easier, but it's still far too crumbly to roll. I tend to just press it into the base of pie tins and things rather than rolling it out, it's not ideal and you obviously can't make pasties or anything like that, but it's better than nothing.

I actually tried it yesterday without the xanthan gum as I didn't have any in and it worked (sort of). I rolled it between 2 pieces of clingfilm, but I had to add a bit more water than the recipe on the pack said (200g flour, 100g butter, 4 tbsp water) for it not to be one big crumble. It was a bit hard though, more like biscuit than shortcrust!

My friend is gluten free and when she is coming round I make pastry with Dove Farm flour it can be harder than other wheat flour pastry so add an egg to it. To roll it out use 2 sheets of greaseproof paper as it crack's easily. Dove Farm works well as a substitute for flour in soups and is better than flour for making REAL gravy.

Thanks for the tip - I used Dove Farm flour, and it was very biscuity so will try adding an egg next time :)

The Raza
29-01-2011, 23:46
Just wondering if anyone has any info or experience of firms that offer Vegetarian gluten free produce? Perhaps ready meals.
My Mum has now to follow a gluten free diet and as she has other health issues, is not able to start cooking from scratch. She's found lots of sweet options, but we are short of simple savoury things. She's not keen on spices and garlic so that makes it difficult.
She LOVES pastry and most of all would fancy a quorn type of pie..... perhaps I'll have to make her one, but it would be great if she could be independent and get them when she's shopping.
She's eating mostly omelettes and jacket potatoes so different ideas would be welcome! It is a challenge as she's not keen on pasta and rice. :S

java dove
01-04-2011, 12:02
http://members2.boardhost.com/glutenfree/

*Peaches*
11-04-2011, 16:22
Nearly 2 years GF and I'm still just as lazy :hihi: I'm still buying ready made stuff mainly, but am going to start making a bigger effort to make more things myself.

steelerman
11-04-2011, 17:17
just found out that warburtons have started doing gluten free bread,had some at the weekend and it was scrummy.

*Peaches*
30-12-2012, 19:54
Just a bump to this thread, my efforts have dwindled recently so I need to get back on the straight and narrow!