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Connecting a gas cooker?

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12-12-2006, 16:32   #1
bethcasson
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Hi there,

I've just bought a gas cooker and need it connecting. Does anyone know any corgi registered people to come and connect it and probably check it too. We've tried calling a few but they're all booked up til after xmas? any ideas?

Cheers
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12-12-2006, 23:31   #2
sassylady
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try dave 07790522591 or 01142863252 he is corgi reg and will call asap cheap n cheerful too!!
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12-12-2006, 23:35   #3
wizzardofODD
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shouldnt there be what is called a (female) "union" joint on the end of gaspipe in ur kitchen & a flexi pipe wih a (male) union joint on the cooker .... just plug in & twist
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13-12-2006, 10:18   #4
Complete-Heat
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Please don't meddle with it as 'wizzard' suggests. How would you know that there was not a gas leak? Theres more to it than just plugging the cooker hose in. Is the cooker new or secondhand. Either way a CORGI gas fitter would also check that it works efficiently and safely - thats what you are paying for
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13-12-2006, 12:04   #5
wizzardofODD
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well...... these "union" joints are i believe corgi approved things , fair enough im no gas fitter myself but ..... there are ways (simple) to test these couplings .... an aerosol is available & u spray the coupling & this would show up etc or a simple way would be to lather the coupling in washing up liquid & look for escaping bubbles ...... if the cooker is new id imagine it unlikely there to be any leak on the appliance ... but if in any doubt , a corgi reg' fitter would be the reccommended way forward

added note:
i have plugged in & out several cookers in my life & never had the slightest problem with union joints
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13-12-2006, 16:39   #6
Complete-Heat
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while i don't disagree with your principle 'wizzard' i do disagree with the practice. Personally, i think that it is ludicrous that the gen. public can go to any DIY store and buy anything from a new gas boiler to leak detection fluid
Stores cover themselves with a 'use a CORGI installer' sticker.
2 other things to note. Firstly, washing up liquid is known to corrode copper so you may eventually end up with more than a few bubbles. Secondly, new does not necessarily mean safe. A 14yr old girl died from carbon monoxide poisoning from a fire that was found to be a manufacturing fault.
Thats not so say there aren't many competent DIY'ers who think they are able to do this(and i'm not saying you are not competent) - but there are also many competent DIY'ers who think they can, but they can't

added note:
its not a union joint its called a bayonet fitting -there are 4 ways of correctly installing a cooker hose to one plus 4 incorrect ways

Last edited by Complete-Heat; 13-12-2006 at 16:45.
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16-12-2006, 12:42   #7
Gavbriggs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astirl2809
Thats not so say there aren't many competent DIY'ers who think they are able to do this(and i'm not saying you are not competent) - but there are also many competent DIY'ers who think they can, but they can't

added note:
its not a union joint its called a bayonet fitting -there are 4 ways of correctly installing a cooker hose to one plus 4 incorrect ways
i agree, fitting a cooker point is easy, connecting a cooker hose is easier still. working out room volume-easy, gas rating-easy, tightness testing-easy, ventilation requirements-easy, checking fsd's ant thermostats-easy, writing out a safety certificate- easy, five years in jail if you get it wrong????
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16-12-2006, 19:50   #8
bigtebone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wizzardofODD
well...... these "union" joints are i believe corgi approved things , fair enough im no gas fitter myself but ..... there are ways (simple) to test these couplings .... an aerosol is available & u spray the coupling & this would show up etc or a simple way would be to lather the coupling in washing up liquid & look for escaping bubbles ...... if the cooker is new id imagine it unlikely there to be any leak on the appliance ... but if in any doubt , a corgi reg' fitter would be the reccommended way forward

added note:
i have plugged in & out several cookers in my life & never had the slightest problem with union joints
u just must have good luck.as washing up liquid doesnt work properly,it as to be diluted,u need a bottle of leak detecion
fluid,which i dont think u can buy in the shops,i work on gas mains for over 16 years,and trust me washing up liquid does leave leaks,one leak could kill everyone in the house for the sake of a few pounds,PLEASE DONT LISTEN TO OTHER PEOPLE RING A PROFESSIONAL
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16-12-2006, 21:02   #9
never wrong
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IF the bayonet fittings on the back of cookers were not intended for you to fit yourself they would not be there in the first place IMO the bayonet fittings are foolproof stop paying the so called corgi fitters just plug it in and then phone transco tell them you can smell gas they will come within the hour
do a pressure test on the meter and it is free job done cost nil.

And if you have just moved in the whole house will be declared safe no money grabbing corgi fitters involved no cost to you the corgi fitters have been given a licence to print money
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16-12-2006, 21:04   #10
Gavbriggs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigtebone
u just must have good luck.as washing up liquid doesnt work properly,it as to be diluted,u need a bottle of leak detecion
fluid,which i dont think u can buy in the shops,i work on gas mains for over 16 years,and trust me washing up liquid does leave leaks,one leak could kill everyone in the house for the sake of a few pounds,PLEASE DONT LISTEN TO OTHER PEOPLE RING A PROFESSIONAL
unfortunately you can buy the stuff at B&Q, i don't remember it giving you a corgi badge with it tho!

working on gas mains( i presume you mean the network not the domestic installations) i reckon you will understand how volatile gas is. i have seen in person a gas supply go up in flames, very very spectactular but gawd did it scare me! also if it is you digging up the roads in darnall can you hurry up please as its directley on the route to the bank we use for buisness! lol

has anyone directed the op to the ronan piont articles on the web, that is where most if not all of the regulations and certainly corgi was born, go google it and read the devastation one small leak can produce!
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16-12-2006, 21:09   #11
Gavbriggs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never wrong
IF the bayonet fittings on the back of cookers were not intended for you to fit yourself they would not be there in the first place IMO the bayonet fittings are foolproof stop paying the so called corgi fitters just plug it in and then phone transco tell them you can smell gas they will come within the hour
do a pressure test on the meter and it is free job done cost nil.

And if you have just moved in the whole house will be declared safe no money grabbing corgi fitters involved no cost to you the corgi fitters have been given a licence to print money
he is right, the bayonet fitting is a user fitting, designed so you can move the cooker/dryer/etc to clean behind or move to another location. but what about the appliance itself. does that need a check, what about the yearly check, compulsory for landlords and recomended for housholders. never wrong, what is the smallest room you can install a cooker in?
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16-12-2006, 21:33   #12
Complete-Heat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never wrong
IF the bayonet fittings on the back of cookers were not intended for you to fit yourself they would not be there in the first place IMO the bayonet fittings are foolproof stop paying the so called corgi fitters just plug it in and then phone transco tell them you can smell gas they will come within the hour
do a pressure test on the meter and it is free job done cost nil.

And if you have just moved in the whole house will be declared safe no money grabbing corgi fitters involved no cost to you the corgi fitters have been given a licence to print money
'neverwrong' here i think you are wrong. Bayonet fittings are not intended to be fitted by the general public. As Gavbriggs states they are intended to be used for intermittent disconnection when you need to move the appliance. Bayonet fittings are also not foolproof - they can leak - all that is holding back 20mb of gas is a small spring and seal.

I've come across many 'neverwrongs' they also go by the alias 'it-weren't-my-fault'.

To suggest that people use Transco in this way is both irresponsible and fraudulent, though i suppose it wouldn't bother you if while you were getting a 'free' check some other house exploded????
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16-12-2006, 22:15   #13
Gavbriggs
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here here astirl
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17-12-2006, 00:31   #14
never wrong
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no it would not that is what we pay for you corgi robbing bxxxxxxxs

I will stick to my statement if they were not meant for DIY they would not be allowed to sell them stop scaremongering everybody with your pathetic rants about only corgi registered can fit them you know it is not true point me me to a regulation with says only corgi registered can uncouple a bayonet fitting and reconnect a bayonet fitting if you can I will concede to you until then stop trying to profit from peoples ignorance.

Last edited by never wrong; 17-12-2006 at 00:36.
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17-12-2006, 01:17   #15
cgksheff
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"work" in relation to a gas fitting includes any of the following activities carried out by any person, whether an employee or not, that is to say -

(a) installing or re-connecting the fitting;
(b) maintaining, servicing, permanently adjusting, disconnecting, repairing, altering or renewing the fitting or purging it of air or gas;
(c) where the fitting is not readily movable, changing its position; and
(d) removing the fitting;


but the expression does not include the connection or disconnection of a bayonet fitting or other self-sealing connector.


Statutory Instruments 1998 No. 2451
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17-12-2006, 14:31   #16
Gavbriggs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never wrong
no it would not that is what we pay for you corgi robbing bxxxxxxxs

I will stick to my statement if they were not meant for DIY they would not be allowed to sell them stop scaremongering everybody with your pathetic rants about only corgi registered can fit them you know it is not true point me me to a regulation with says only corgi registered can uncouple a bayonet fitting and reconnect a bayonet fitting if you can I will concede to you until then stop trying to profit from peoples ignorance.
a bayonet fitting is a user fitting, it is the hose to the cooker for which you need a corgi, cookers don't come with attached hoses when new.
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17-12-2006, 23:25   #17
Complete-Heat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never wrong
no it would not that is what we pay for you corgi robbing bxxxxxxxs

I will stick to my statement if they were not meant for DIY they would not be allowed to sell them stop scaremongering everybody with your pathetic rants about only corgi registered can fit them you know it is not true point me me to a regulation with says only corgi registered can uncouple a bayonet fitting and reconnect a bayonet fitting if you can I will concede to you until then stop trying to profit from peoples ignorance.
Can't you read.... no-one has said that you can't uncouple or re-connect to a bayonet fitting as yes its a 'user fitting'. Go back and read what you originally said which was:
1. you think that its Ok take a bayonet fitting and install it into a gas carcass.
2. you believe that a bayonet fitting is 'foolproof'.
3. however, just to make sure everything is fine call Transco.

I think your last statement contradicts the first two.

And read the initial statement to which the reply was made. 'Bethcasson' wants a new cooker installing. So who do you think should do this.....you???
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18-12-2006, 09:48   #18
never wrong
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astirl2809
Can't you read.... no-one has said that you can't uncouple or re-connect to a bayonet fitting as yes its a 'user fitting'. Go back and read what you originally said which was:
1. you think that its Ok take a bayonet fitting and install it into a gas carcass.
2. you believe that a bayonet fitting is 'foolproof'.
3. however, just to make sure everything is fine call Transco.

I think your last statement contradicts the first two.

And read the initial statement to which the reply was made. 'Bethcasson' wants a new cooker installing. So who do you think should do this.....you???
if it is just a bayonet fitting I will do it yes
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06-01-2007, 23:12   #19
gasbanni
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A gas cooker bayonet fitting is a gas fitting and as such the gas regulations apply - period. If you think that because its possible for anybody to uncouple and recouple it that makes it ok to do so, you are mistaken. The actual intention of the flexible hose is so that the cooker can be carefully moved out so that cleaning can take place without disconnecting the appliance. The bayonet connection allows the hose to swivel on the O ring.The gas regs are there to save lives not line corgi fitters pockets. A cooker is an unflued gas appliance siting, ventilation and correct working of the appliance, operation of the safety devices all need to be checked plus a stability bracket. NEW as well a second hand appliances can leak I've had them all. Plus the correct positioning of the back plate elbow to allow the hose to hang correctly is vital.(far too many registered installers dont do this either ,) Its very rare one out of fifty ? where the backplate dose'nt need moving so pipework is usually involved. A gas fitter would have to pay 300 or so to be assessed as competent to work on or install cookers! As for transco checking your work- if its classed as immediately dangerous and you in your ignorance have fitted it CORGI and the HSE will be after you. Make no mistake illegal and incompetant gas fitters are been jailed. On this occasion you are not never wrong but just plain wrong.
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06-01-2007, 23:51   #20
natasha77
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im a very competent person i fitted my sisters cooker via bayonet fittings new hoses etc .on checking it leaked it had some debris in it .never be sure .always have it checked.never use old hoses.how much is a life worth
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