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23-05-2016, 14:19   #1
Anna B
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I saw a van driving round in Australia with the name 'Handy Husband - 'we do all those jobs he said he'd do, but never gets round to...'

I thought it was a brilliant idea, and one that somebody over here could borrow. It said it all. There's a real need for odd job men, I'm sure somebody could make a good living out of it.

I speak as someone who knows an old lady who ended up paying an electrician the best part of 50 to change a lightbulb....
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23-05-2016, 23:41   #2
Tomjames
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The names a bit tacky and sexist. It's like starting a company called "good cooks, we cook great tasting food unlike your wife"
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24-05-2016, 00:16   #3
Mayfly182
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I agree, very sexist.
I'm a woman and I'm quite capable of not getting round to DIY jobs, thank you.
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24-05-2016, 13:06   #4
L00b
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Originally Posted by Mayfly182 View Post
I agree, very sexist.
I'm a woman and I'm quite capable of not getting round to DIY jobs, thank you.


We need a 'like' button on SF (897th request, and counting).
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24-05-2016, 13:37   #5
kidley
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What a sad three you are, thank you Anna B, It made me smile, and it was well thought out.
_______
Beware of critics who claim to know what you mean better than you do.
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26-05-2016, 12:01   #6
Chez2
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That type of business model has been on TV loads of times. Its always suggested to failing family run DIY / hardware shops as an extra service they can provide. There is a need for this type of work but agree the name is awful.

I used to know someone who did small jobs like this but you have to think about the time wasted travelling between jobs if you aren't going to charge much.
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01-06-2016, 22:26   #7
onlineo
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The business model would work fine. But if you think that you can only do 4 to 5 jobs per day and have to hold a lot of stock and tools in your van, or you do 2 jobs a day. Visit person leave and purchase goods and tools needed, return, do small job.
To pay a decent wage you would need high prices that most Sheffielders would not be prepared to pay!
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02-06-2016, 20:57   #8
Anna B
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Originally Posted by onlineo View Post
The business model would work fine. But if you think that you can only do 4 to 5 jobs per day and have to hold a lot of stock and tools in your van, or you do 2 jobs a day. Visit person leave and purchase goods and tools needed, return, do small job.
To pay a decent wage you would need high prices that most Sheffielders would not be prepared to pay!
Price is always going to be an issue. As I said in intro - old lady had to pay an electrician 50 to change a lightbulb, which is ridiculous. Time was when a neighbour or family member would pop round and do this sort of thing, but sadly, that's not happening so much these days. A lot of jobs are necessary (or even essential) but not worth a lot of money.
Maybe the voluntary sector could take it up, or a retired person doing it on an hourly rate.
Talking of sexism, nobody seems to care that care assistants, usually women, (Suggested Company name - "We look after your Mother so you don't have to") are not paid for time spent travelling from job to job etc. and are rushed off their feet working very hard for minimum wage.
Men, it seems, wouldn't be prepared to do that.
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02-06-2016, 22:11   #9
onlineo
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Originally Posted by Anna B View Post
Price is always going to be an issue. As I said in intro - old lady had to pay an electrician 50 to change a lightbulb, which is ridiculous. Time was when a neighbour or family member would pop round and do this sort of thing, but sadly, that's not happening so much these days. A lot of jobs are necessary (or even essential) but not worth a lot of money.
Maybe the voluntary sector could take it up, or a retired person doing it on an hourly rate.
Talking of sexism, nobody seems to care that care assistants, usually women, (Suggested Company name - "We look after your Mother so you don't have to") are not paid for time spent travelling from job to job etc. and are rushed off their feet working very hard for minimum wage.
Men, it seems, wouldn't be prepared to do that.
It is a scandal ans probably the largest one there is. It is the same for people who are contracted to clean people's home on a self employed basis. Similar too are the people who work in distribution warehouses who turn up to work in the middle of nowhere only to find they are not needed that day, or the delivery driver who can't make minimum wage because there is a traffic jam, and houses have back door only entrances in Sheffield which isnt factored into head offices spreadsheet of timing. The issue is that these people are employees and should be treated and compensated properly, they are not running a business and so should not be seen as self employed contractors.

If you vote Tory (inc new Labour) you get Tory and the rights of the worst off are eroded. Pretty sure even more rights will be eroded if we leave the Eu but that has little to do with handy husband business idea
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02-06-2016, 23:59   #10
Anna B
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Originally Posted by onlineo View Post
It is a scandal ans probably the largest one there is. It is the same for people who are contracted to clean people's home on a self employed basis. Similar too are the people who work in distribution warehouses who turn up to work in the middle of nowhere only to find they are not needed that day, or the delivery driver who can't make minimum wage because there is a traffic jam, and houses have back door only entrances in Sheffield which isnt factored into head offices spreadsheet of timing. The issue is that these people are employees and should be treated and compensated properly, they are not running a business and so should not be seen as self employed contractors.

If you vote Tory (inc new Labour) you get Tory and the rights of the worst off are eroded. Pretty sure even more rights will be eroded if we leave the Eu but that has little to do with handy husband business idea
thanks for that. I agree.
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03-06-2016, 06:10   #11
Chez2
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You seem to be contradicting yourself Anna B. You swing from saying an old lady paid 50 for her light bulb changing so perhaps somebody can do it on an hourly rate then turn round and complain about people only being paid a minimum wage, no travelling for doing a similar role.

If somebody paid the handy person an hourly rate this would still have to be covered by the charge to the person needing work done. Even if it was a not for profit organisation the charge would still need to cover the vehicle, fuel, insurance etc. and other overheads one way or another.

A lot of elderly people have a cleaner. If there were more than one light source in a room the cleaner could change a light bulb.

It is awful people don't know their neighbours or neighbours don't help. We always seem to he been lucky with our neighbours and have helped each other out.

I have often thought about more sheltered housing where people can live independent but are all close by if they need extra help. I know some of this type of housing exists but from what I can see its more expensive than hiring full time help when you look at the cost of purchase and ongoing fees. I am talking about people that only need the odd bit of help as you suggest, not someone that needs nursing care.
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03-06-2016, 14:21   #12
Anna B
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Originally Posted by Chez2 View Post
You seem to be contradicting yourself Anna B. You swing from saying an old lady paid 50 for her light bulb changing so perhaps somebody can do it on an hourly rate then turn round and complain about people only being paid a minimum wage, no travelling for doing a similar role.

If somebody paid the handy person an hourly rate this would still have to be covered by the charge to the person needing work done. Even if it was a not for profit organisation the charge would still need to cover the vehicle, fuel, insurance etc. and other overheads one way or another.

A lot of elderly people have a cleaner. If there were more than one light source in a room the cleaner could change a light bulb.

It is awful people don't know their neighbours or neighbours don't help. We always seem to he been lucky with our neighbours and have helped each other out.

I have often thought about more sheltered housing where people can live independent but are all close by if they need extra help. I know some of this type of housing exists but from what I can see its more expensive than hiring full time help when you look at the cost of purchase and ongoing fees. I am talking about people that only need the odd bit of help as you suggest, not someone that needs nursing care.
You're right, I am confused. It takes only minutes to change a lightbullb, so 15 minutes on minimum wage should probably cost no more than 2.50.

OAP's seem to be ripe pickings for con men, and anyone who would charge a vulnerable OAP 50 for changing a light bulb I think falls into that catagory, although no doubt there will be others who disagree.

Same with fees for sheltered housing, and the various schemes that are supposed to help old people but whose main aim is to part them from their life savings. They might desperately need help, but surely it should not be at any cost. Too many people seem happy to exploit others these days.

These sort of services, and homecare, homehelps etc used to be done by the council for 'free,' and it was a better world because of it. Since privatisation it just seems to be a licence to rip people off.

Last edited by Anna B; 03-06-2016 at 17:29.
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03-06-2016, 15:02   #13
Chez2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anna B View Post
You're right, I am confused. It takes only minutes to change a lightbullb, so 15 minutes on minimum wage should probably cost no more than 2.50.

OAP's seem to be ripe pickings for con men, and anyone who would charge a vulnerable OAP 50 for changing a light bulb I think falls into that catagory, although no doubt there will be others who disagree.

Same with fees for sheltered housing, and the various schemes that are supposed to help old people but whose main aim to part them from their life savings. They might desperately need help, but surely it should not be at any cost. Too many people seem happy to exploit others these days.

These sort of services, and homecare, homehelps etc used to be done by the council for 'free,' and it was a better world because of it. Since privatisation it just seems to be a licence to rip people off.
How did you manage to arrive at a fee of 2.50 for changing a lightbulb? Where do you think they would be travelling from and back to and how would they travel and earn enough money for 2.50 to cover time on site and travel timel?
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03-06-2016, 17:37   #14
Anna B
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Originally Posted by Chez2 View Post
How did you manage to arrive at a fee of 2.50 for changing a lightbulb? Where do you think they would be travelling from and back to and how would they travel and earn enough money for 2.50 to cover time on site and travel timel?
I'm using the same method that carers get.
Minimum wage, docked for less than whole hours worked, .
1 hour = 10.00ish
15 minutes +2.50
and no time or travelling allowance.

If you don't think that's fair, then lend your support to the many thousands of carers who have no choice but to accept these conditions.
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03-06-2016, 18:18   #15
Marx
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Originally Posted by Anna B View Post
I'm using the same method that carers get.
Minimum wage, docked for less than whole hours worked, .
1 hour = 10.00ish
15 minutes +2.50
and no time or travelling allowance.

If you don't think that's fair, then lend your support to the many thousands of carers who have no choice but to accept these conditions.
I did it for a while between jobs. We got paid for dropping children back from contacts with 'alleged' parents, to their foster carers but not for the time taken between care jobs. I had one client who was a five minute walk away. After I blew the whistle on his money-grabbing family, I was out of work. That is another problem we carers face. The company paid us a few pence over the minimum wage plus a pound 'holiday' pay.
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04-06-2016, 09:54   #16
Chez2
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Originally Posted by Anna B View Post
I'm using the same method that carers get.
Minimum wage, docked for less than whole hours worked, .
1 hour = 10.00ish
15 minutes +2.50
and no time or travelling allowance.

If you don't think that's fair, then lend your support to the many thousands of carers who have no choice but to accept these conditions.
You are forgetting this is the money the employee receives not the employer. Read my post and you will see I have already explained this point to you.

If people don't like it, don't accept the job. It happened to me when I was doing agency work. I refused to have a zero hours contract. They tried to change it once I had started. They could have quite easily terminated my contract as I was only a temp but they didn't. I left for another job a few months later.
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04-06-2016, 13:02   #17
Anna B
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Originally Posted by Chez2 View Post
You are forgetting this is the money the employee receives not the employer. Read my post and you will see I have already explained this point to you.

If people don't like it, don't accept the job. It happened to me when I was doing agency work. I refused to have a zero hours contract. They tried to change it once I had started. They could have quite easily terminated my contract as I was only a temp but they didn't. I left for another job a few months later.
I'm well aware that the employers make money off the backs of people on minimum wage.

Unemployment benefits are such a minefield these days, is it even possible to turn down a job without loss of benefits? Quitting a job, as opposed to being fired, also sees you without benefits. People have rent to pay and other obligations.
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28-06-2016, 13:29   #18
hyper
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anna B View Post
I'm using the same method that carers get.
Minimum wage, docked for less than whole hours worked, .
1 hour = 10.00ish
15 minutes +2.50
and no time or travelling allowance.

If you don't think that's fair, then lend your support to the many thousands of carers who have no choice but to accept these conditions.
Does a carer need to buy a van and insure/tax & run it? No!
Does a carer need to employ an accountant to do their books/tax/Vat? No!
If a carer turns up at work not feeling 100% and has an easier day, does it affect their earnings? No!
Is the carer job likely to be a family's main source of income? Probably not.

I'm not a carer and I bet its it bluddy hard, but you are comparing apples and grapes, and as such are out of touch with running a business.
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28-06-2016, 13:44   #19
Chez2
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I have already tried to explain that to AnnaB. She is comparing an employees hourly rate to gross income (for that job) of a business. I think we are wasting our time.
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28-06-2016, 18:54   #20
Anna B
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Crikey, it was only an idea... Forget it.
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