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16-02-2017, 17:30   #1
jacc14
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hi my partner is a self employed driver and gets 6.95 per hour and 14p per mile he drives

This seems low as he doesn't get the usual employee benefits like holiday and sick pay. Also the I'm not sure 14p will cover his running costs

Can anyone suggest an acceptable rate as he is going to ask for some sort of increase
thanks
jacc14
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16-02-2017, 19:52   #2
andyofborg
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if he;s over 25 then the national living wage is 7-20 per hour, 6.95 is the 21 to 24 rate

the hmrc maximum rates are 45p per mile for the first 10000 miles and 25p thereafter above this they start looking at taxing the payment so 14p seems a bit niggardly
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17-02-2017, 02:02   #3
Isiris
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Theres no such thing as minimum wage for Self Employed
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17-02-2017, 04:25   #4
Anna B
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isiris View Post
Theres no such thing as minimum wage for Self Employed
That's true, but surely minimum wage is at least a starting point for calculating what your own rate should be, or it's hardly worth starting up.
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20-02-2017, 14:40   #5
steveroberts
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I agree Anna. To the OP, if your partner is only driving for them then HMRC would treat him as being employed by the company he is contracting with. Regarding the 14p/mile; are they providing the Van? If so then HMRC would definitely consider him to be an employee!

Otherwise my advice would be to go and fund other customers who would pay a fair amount/hour and a mileage rate to cover the true costs of the van.
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20-02-2017, 15:10   #6
jacc14
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Thanks for your replies. It's his own car and sure the 14p is not covering running costs. He only drives for this company but is considered as self employed even though he works in the office sometimes too.
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20-02-2017, 19:07   #7
dorberman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacc14 View Post
Thanks for your replies. It's his own car and sure the 14p is not covering running costs. He only drives for this company but is considered as self employed even though he works in the office sometimes too.
as a self employed person he can claim allowance of 45p per mile against his expenses
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21-02-2017, 09:23   #8
Chez2
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It does seem rather low, really unreasonable. Its doesn't seem worth working.

When I had an employer our mileage payment was really low but we were given quite a decent monthly car allowance too if we provided our own car. Its surprising how much the price of business car insurance and the cost of devaluation of the value of the car adds up to though when doing high mileage.
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25-02-2017, 09:15   #9
Isiris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveroberts View Post
I agree Anna. To the OP, if your partner is only driving for them then HMRC would treat him as being employed by the company he is contracting with. Regarding the 14p/mile; are they providing the Van? If so then HMRC would definitely consider him to be an employee!

Otherwise my advice would be to go and fund other customers who would pay a fair amount/hour and a mileage rate to cover the true costs of the van.
Please explain how "Only Driving" for them would make him employed by yhe company. So all Taxi Drivers are Employed.
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25-02-2017, 12:16   #10
*Belle*
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I think that steveroberts means that, if he is driving 'exclusively' for this company, HMRC would consider him to be employed by them. HMRC can then insist that he is placed on their payroll and must be an employee.

And as you mention taxi drivers, the Uber tribunal came to a similar conclusion.
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20-04-2017, 08:14   #11
TheNugget
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If he is self employed, then why doesn't he just pay himself more?!

This really winds me up! Companies are just circumventing employment law by "not" employing people!
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20-04-2017, 09:30   #12
Chez2
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Originally Posted by TheNugget View Post
If he is self employed, then why doesn't he just pay himself more?!

This really winds me up! Companies are just circumventing employment law by "not" employing people!
Its about claiming from the company giving him the work his 'employer' ie company he's subcontracting from. The money has to come from somewhere so he can pay himself, you're missing the point.
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20-04-2017, 11:53   #13
TheNugget
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chez2 View Post
Its about claiming from the company giving him the work his 'employer' ie company he's subcontracting from. The money has to come from somewhere so he can pay himself, you're missing the point.
I'm with you. I was highlighting the absurdity of being called Self Employed whilst actually being employed by a company in everything but name. It should not be allowed. Can't he get other driving jobs?
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