View Full Version : Cigarette smoke coming into house from next door, what can I do?


gd_1
21-02-2006, 21:11
Next door to our house is a flat. The guy that has just moved in smokes like a chimney and it comes into our bedroom. Is there anything I can do to stop it. Do I have any rights at all in regards to getting the landlord to sort it out? I am in the process of blocking up any gaps I can find but as soon as I fill one it comes in somewhere else.

It is really starting to annoy me and has started to go into my little girls room.

fierysatsuma
21-02-2006, 21:29
Shoot him - I'm sorry, not very helpful I know, but I know how you feel. I'm that person who really hates cigarette smoke and can smell it from a mile-off. If I'm in traffic on my way to work, I can smell it coming from the car in front of me! Having a small child (presumably) I imagine it is quite frustrating - You want to protect the health of your child at any cost.

gnomi
21-02-2006, 21:33
is it tobbacco smoke? If it is then i doubt there is anything you can do(at least whilst you're legally allowed to smoke in your own home!)
I imagine the first thing to do would be to have a word with this man-most people are basically decent and im sure that if he knew how badly it is affecting you,he would want to sort something out?
I'd do this sooner rather than later as the better weather will be with us soon,which,of course,means open windows! x x

Bartfarst
21-02-2006, 21:45
Go down to your local reptile shop and buy a tube of 100 black crickets, used to feed spiders and small reptiles.

Pour the tube through his letterbox in the middle of the night, and by the next day he'll not have much time to stop for a fag as he tries to sort out the 100 trimphones all over his flat.

They breed well too, and are hard to kill with pesticides.

CHAIRBOY
21-02-2006, 21:57
Shoot him - I'm sorry, not very helpful I know, but I know how you feel. I'm that person who really hates cigarette smoke and can smell it from a mile-off. If I'm in traffic on my way to work, I can smell it coming from the car in front of me! Having a small child (presumably) I imagine it is quite frustrating - You want to protect the health of your child at any cost.
Sympathise entirely and agree with the above but as gnomi says, not much you can do legally.

gd_1
21-02-2006, 22:08
He seems very grumpy. Is suppose having a polite word with him might be the best we can do.

beamer
21-02-2006, 22:14
Yeah i'd i've a polite word too...even if you suggest he keeps his windows open through the day!!!!!
If that doesnt work you could always get in touch with the Enviromental Health and ask for advise...If they cant advise at least you have tried...GOOD LUCK and i hope you get the problem solved especially for you little girl:thumbsup:

Cyclone
21-02-2006, 22:56
keep blocking up the holes in the meantime (invest in a silicone gun and several tubes), surely you shouldn't really have many 'holes' through into next doors flat anyway.

Fareast
21-02-2006, 23:12
Try living on a desert island--------unless the smsll of ozone upsets you too ?

vidster
21-02-2006, 23:15
Our old house had the same problem in our bedroom. Like Cyclone said, a silicon gun and a few tubes of silicon does the job. No idea what to do when you want to open a window though :?

Strix
21-02-2006, 23:27
Hmmmm. Surely the fabric of the building is hislandlord's responsiblillity?

As has been pointed out already, he has every right to smoke in his own home (unless his contract says otherwise ;) ), so it's the responsibility of his landlord to ensure that the building he's renting out is sound?

Is there a chimney in your bedroom btw? sometimes the chimney is shared between 2 properties, and can cause some odd draughts even when supposedly bricked up.

Bruno
21-02-2006, 23:40
turn your bedroom into a public place, then from next year he will have to stand outside lol

Mathom
21-02-2006, 23:49
Next door to our house is a flat. The guy that has just moved in smokes like a chimney and it comes into our bedroom. Is there anything I can do to stop it. Do I have any rights at all in regards to getting the landlord to sort it out? I am in the process of blocking up any gaps I can find but as soon as I fill one it comes in somewhere else.

It is really starting to annoy me and has started to go into my little girls room.

I don't get how the smoke comes in? Is he standing by an open window? if so, he'd have to be smoking something like 100 a day. Or is he standing under an extractor fan? My parents' neighbour does this and though they can smell it, they've been reassured that it will not be doing any harm.

How can it actually be coming through the fabric of the building? That's very worrying. Do you only have fibreboard partition walls?

Anyway, on the bright side, it will only be the smell that you are getting, unless you have holes above a few inches in the walls, and Im surprised you're getting that. It's only like when my pryo neighbour has his regular infernos in his yard - it stinks the place out but there isn't any actual smoke coming in. You can get rid of bad smells with an ioniser, probably a good idea anyway if you're worried about a child's health in a city with all those traffic fumes outside.

hagardriley
22-02-2006, 00:10
You could always try a Volvo modification kit! :mad:

gd_1
22-02-2006, 07:38
It comes in under the floor boards. There are gaps in the bricks between the houses. It is nothing to do with the windows. For some reason our house is sucking the air out of the flat.

Fareast -Try living on a desert island--------unless the smsll of ozone upsets you too ?

I would love to but it looks a bit scary with all those Others running around, smack addicts and strange monsters in the jungle.

Strix
22-02-2006, 23:48
I bet your place is warmer than next door. It'll be the rising warm air causing a convection current and sucking the cooler air through the cavities constucted in the fabric of the building to feed the original fires with oxygen.

Have you still got a fireplace?

eric_the_man
23-02-2006, 10:16
I think you will find that if this is definatly coming from next door, be it fag smoke or otherwise. as it is/could be a danger to your health then you have a right to report it.
I would try approaching the landlord/owner of the property first and if you get no joy from that, then go to the council and ask them to investigate it for you. they should order him/her to repair the property.

I would try phoning the Council/enviromental health and ask for advise, raising your concerns about this. if you are lucky, they will do all the asking and telling to who ever owns the other property.

Eric_The_Man

johnbradley
23-02-2006, 10:23
definately have a word, im sure he'll be more considerate then, if he's not a tosser -

thing is, as annoying as breathing other peoples smoke in is, you have more chance of being hit by lightening than damaging your health off it...

there are still no conclusive links to illness from secondary smoke.

living next to a main road means you breathe in the equivalent of many cigarettes a day from all the exhaust fumes, yet breathing that crap in all the time...do people living there drop like flies?

i dont think so:|

Floe
23-02-2006, 10:39
We live in a fairly old semi-detached house...1904, I think.
We get the smells of cigarettes and, sometimes, cooking through from next door. I say, sometimes as our neighbour doesn't cook often.
When the chimney sweep came this year we asked him how we could deal with the problem.
He said that we couldn't as the fumes come through the bricks in the chimney flue. As the bricks age there are minute gaps in the cement between the bricks and they let fumes through. The smells we get come through the chimney which, although not shared with the neighbour obviously backs onto his chimney piece.
From this post I recognise that our house is probably warmer than the neighbour's (we always have the heating on) and so draws the fumes through.
In fact, we haven't said anything as the neighbour was recently widdowed and smoking is probably a solace for him.
It is weird, though, to have smells coming through in a solidly built house.

spud
23-02-2006, 10:44
Next door to our house is a flat. The guy that has just moved in smokes like a chimney and it comes into our bedroom. Is there anything I can do to stop it. Do I have any rights at all in regards to getting the landlord to sort it out? I am in the process of blocking up any gaps I can find but as soon as I fill one it comes in somewhere else.

It is really starting to annoy me and has started to go into my little girls room.

Close your window and stop moaning like a big gurls blouse

Yellowrose
23-02-2006, 10:50
I used to live in a bungalow and the bedroom was an outside wall. Even with the windows closed I would be laying in bed and get a strong whiff of smoke. I never did fathom it out where it came from, but it used to make me and my partner feel sick, being non smokers. We used to joke about it being a ghost. We wondered if the place had previously been habited by smokers and the smell was ingrained in the fabric of the building and was somehow gradually leaching out. We had redecorated and recarpeted and there was no fireplace and it had a concrete floor. I wondered if it somehow crept in through the window frames?

PerlOfWisdom
23-02-2006, 11:19
there are still no conclusive links to illness from secondary smoke.

There's no conclusive proof of gravity but most people believe in it..

Anyway, to stop the smoke coming in your house you need to increase the air pressure in your house - something like a wall fan blowing fresh air in.

Tradescanthia
23-02-2006, 11:29
E-mail Tony Blair, he will have your neighbour evicted, executed or both.
After all he has got plenty of time on his hands, happily ignoring real crime and leading the persecution of people who LEGALLY smoke[ yes, smoking is not illegal].

Throngor
23-02-2006, 11:45
I think you will find that if this is definatly coming from next door, be it fag smoke or otherwise. as it is/could be a danger to your health then you have a right to report it.
I would try approaching the landlord/owner of the property first and if you get no joy from that, then go to the council and ask them to investigate it for you. they should order him/her to repair the property.

I would try phoning the Council/enviromental health and ask for advise, raising your concerns about this. if you are lucky, they will do all the asking and telling to who ever owns the other property.

Eric_The_Man

Sorry, but smelling smoke doesn't constitute passive smoking, the health risks from smoke coming through his floor boards is practically zero. What would be the best suggestion for him if he finds the smell of cigarettes so galling is to buy an air freshener.

sharpend
23-02-2006, 11:50
Doesn't help you at the moment but theres a steady chance he'll die before you...

gd_1
23-02-2006, 12:08
Close your window and stop moaning like a big gurls blouse

Try living on a desert island--------unless the smsll of ozone upsets you too ?

Oh I love the comments that have been made from these two. Thank you, your suggestions have been the best so far. They really help me get rid of the smell and stop my little girls room/clothes smelling of smoke.

Not the actual suggestions but the attitude. I will go round next door and tell the guy to 'try smoking on a desert island' or gve up smoking and if he complains tell him to stop moaning like a big gurls blouse.

Either he will be dead scared and suddenly decide smoking is very bad or he will try to fettle me.

Mathom
23-02-2006, 12:10
As I've already said earlier, my mother can smell cigarette smoke coming from her neighbour's extractor fan and was convinced it was actual smoke - in fact it is just the smell of the smoke as it is so quickly dispersed. 'Smoke' coming through airbricks or chimney flues etc will in fact be smell and not smoke.

Once you can smell something you become convinced that something much worse is happening, and often you continue to experience the smell long after it has gone if it is something distasteful to you. If anyone has had rotten pet food to get rid of they will know what I mean about a lingering psychological 'smell'! :gag:

An ioniser would work a treat.

Throngor
23-02-2006, 12:13
As I've already said earlier, my mother can smell cigarette smoke coming from her neighbour's extractor fan and was convinced it was actual smoke - in fact it is just the smell of the smoke as it is so quickly dispersed. 'Smoke' coming through airbricks or chimney flues etc will in fact be smell and not smoke.

Once you can smell something you become convinced that something much worse is happening, and often you continue to experience the smell long after it has gone if it is something distasteful to you. If anyone has had rotten pet food to get rid of they will know what I mean about a lingering psychological 'smell'! :gag:

An ioniser would work a treat.

Voice of sense, ioniser would most definitely be the way forward, not only will it get rid of the smell but you won't have to fettle your neighbour.

gd_1
23-02-2006, 12:15
What is an ioniser?

Mathom
23-02-2006, 12:19
I don't know how they work, as I'm not technically minded, but it's basically a thingummyjig that purifies the air in a room. Some say it removes 'positive ions' and replaces them with energising 'negative' ions, other descriptions simply say they clean the air, having the effect of a lot of fresh spring air in your room.

But never mind the mumbo-jumbo, they are just effective at cleaning the air in your house, and you can get them in Argos. :thumbsup:

SallyLaLaLa
23-02-2006, 13:15
Is he next door to you or underneath you? If he is next door to you I would suggest having a word and request that he not smoke in the rooms that adjoin yours. If that's his bedroom/kitchen/bathroom you will probably be okay - but if it's his sitting room you might not be in luck.

As for the people saying he should keep his windows open he would quite reasonably tell you to sod off. He would be freezing at this time of year and would have to spend extra heating his house, he would be quite within his rights to say that you should lay out the expense of insulating your own home to the smell rather than him paying for heating when you have the problem.

When you say landlord I'm not sure if you means yours or his - but I doubt either would help you. If you are in a home you own and he rents it would definitely mean the onus was on you to shell out to fix the problem. However if he owns his own and you rent unfortunately he would be quite within his rights to say he owns it and can do what he wants there.

Maybe thicker floor coverings? Rugs?

PerlOfWisdom
23-02-2006, 13:55
An ioniser is a device that contains sharp needles at a very high voltage. They spray out electrons into the air, which hit any dust particles, charging them up to a high voltage. The dust particles are then attracted to any surface that is not at high voltage.

It will clean the air. but after a few days, any surface nearby will be covered in this dust and it is almost impossible to clean off.

Strix
23-02-2006, 16:11
That's why the ionising air filters are a much better product than just an ioniser - the price difference is significant though.

Oh, and btw.... dust (and fag smoke) 'floats' in the air because it is positively charged, and therefore repels the adjacent positively charged particles (else gravity would work on it ;) ), so the ioniser works by ejecting negative ions to neutralise the negative charge, and thereby lets gravity get on with the business of causing the particles to fall.

It's only a small amount of dust nearest the machine that gets over zapped and sticks to surfaces in the vacinity, but if you choose a glass shelf or vinyl wallpaper to park it on/next to, you shouldn't have too much bother.

Ionisers are great for hayfever sufferers too :thumbsup:

fhain29
23-02-2006, 16:44
Oh, this is the sign of the times. There is nothing you can so, and there is nothing you should be able to do. Your neighbour is stupid to smoke, but he is doing it in his own house. Maybe when you bought your property or moved in there it didn't bother you much because you weren't aware of it. Now we are much more aware of smoking and treat it differently.
In future I suspect surveyors will be required to check properties for such points.

It's true though: Exhaust fumes do us more damage, yet we seldom complain about the roads in front of our houses because we have cars, want cars and use cars. Maybe in 25 years the middle classes will realise that the motorcar in its present form and the pollution it causes is so odious that it becomes anti-social.

But I digress. Close your window.

Yellowrose
23-02-2006, 17:24
I sympathise with you on this as I would hate it. I hate the smell of smoke but people who smoke, live with smokers or used to smoke dont seem to be bothered by it. I hate the smell on my clothes after a night out. It really clings.

Can you borrow an ioniser from someone to try before splashing out? The reason I say this is that I suffer from hayfever and bought one many years ago and found it didnt make the slightest difference. It was a remington ioniser and I bought it from Argos. It may be that they are better now and some are better than others, but you dont want to be lumbered with a useless one, so try and borrow one, or get one second hand.

Cyclone
23-02-2006, 18:20
We have a combined ioniers/hepa air filter. Not as quite as it could be, but if you can identify the main source of the smell and stick the filter infront of it, it should filter out most of the smell in combination with the ioniser.
Of course an ioniser is only going to work if the airflow in the room isn't too high though.

InvalidUser
23-02-2006, 21:56
Close your window and stop moaning like a big gurls blouseHere, here!

Despite what the killjoys on this forum fantasise about in their wet dreams you can't stop people smoking in their own house.

Get a life.

rogueshark
24-02-2006, 03:57
I myself am a smoker. Cigarette smoke is today considered a toxin that affects others around you. That is why rules have been put in place in public places that do not permit smoking. If you are breathing toxic fumes of any kind and it is affecting you, then your landlord has a responsibility to take care of the problem, whether fixing paths that smoke is penetrating into your home etc. Just the same, if you were getting fumes from a gas leak in your home, your landlord is held accountable to fix these problems. No, you can't make someone stop smoking in their own home but, the landlord should be responsible for making sure that those things that are affecting you that are coming from neighboring tennants are resolved...........Yours Truly....Rogue Shark

gd_1
24-02-2006, 23:40
Does nobody actually read what I said?? Nowhere have I said he had no right to do what ever he wants to do in his house. It just stinks in mine and a want to know what I can do about it. E.g. block it up somehow, tackfully talk to him? In addition I has already stated many times the smoke does not come in through the window. Spud has not read the post. We own our house. He lives in a rented flat.

rothschild
25-02-2006, 01:54
Mmmmmm......bit of a begger when you can smell something that you don't like isn't it? I hate the smell of garlic.......it makes me heave! I hate the smells generated from all of the fast food places. Greasy chip joints etc etc. Foreign food smells.......I could go on and on here. My Mother in law lives on woodseats and that has become a mecca for all foreign food places. It never used to stink like it does now. I wouldn't live there for a Kings ransome because of all the orrible smells generated from the fast food joints......but some folk might love it. Each to our own. However........the smells generated from these places are not illegal......neither is the smell of cigarette smoke! The only thing I can suggest is that you move to a place where the only smells that you experience are those that you create. Good luck .......because you will need it! In a perfect world everybody would be just like us.........and what a boring place that would be.

crawley
25-02-2006, 07:00
yes it is amazing how strong the smell can be....certainly go with the tubes of sealant and such...he is adjacent to you or under you?

gd_1
25-02-2006, 08:04
Our bedroom is adjacent to his kitchen.

Rothchild - Each to our own. However........the smells generated from these places are not illegal......neither is the smell of cigarette smoke! The only thing I can suggest is that you move to a place where the only smells that you experience are those that you create. Good luck .......because you will need it! In a perfect world everybody would be just like us.........and what a boring place that would be.

Bing - yet another person who did not read my post and thought I was ranting about anti smoking.

I DO NOT LIKE THE SMOKE IN MY HOUSE AND WANT TO KNOW IF ANYBODY HAD ANY GOOD IDEAS ABOUT STOPPING IT COMING IN.

johnbradley
25-02-2006, 14:10
There's no conclusive proof of gravity but most people believe in it..

completely different.

over the course of the last couple of centuries, it has become fairly clear that the theory of gravity makes sense.

although it is sensible to assume that secondary smoke has some kind of effect, the inductive leap to link that to long term health risks is simply speculative.

you may as well stop using that microwave and mobile phone too...and try not to sit too close to that computer monitor, your hair will start to fall out:gag:

johnbradley
25-02-2006, 14:13
and GD 1, why don't you talk to the bloke anyway?

a solution may be closer to hand than it seems -

Cyclone
25-02-2006, 14:34
completely different.

over the course of the last couple of centuries, it has become fairly clear that the theory of gravity makes sense.

although it is sensible to assume that secondary smoke has some kind of effect, the inductive leap to link that to long term health risks is simply speculative.

you may as well stop using that microwave and mobile phone too...and try not to sit too close to that computer monitor, your hair will start to fall out:gag:

the theory of gravity makes sense, and the theory that breathing in a whole bunch of carcinogens, tar, particulates and the other 4000 harmful substances in cigarette smoke, unfiltered, is bad for you also makes sense.

johnbradley
25-02-2006, 14:43
very true, but we do that all the time anyway, living close to busy main roads and subsequent exhaust fumes.

and are those folk living next to busy roads dropping like flies...?

i do agree though, being forced to breathe secondary smoke is deeply unpleasant, and it needs to be resolved regardless of the potential health issues.

Rene_pierin
27-04-2008, 19:31
I am a landlord in Crookes, I live in the attic and rent the 1st floor 3 bedrooms out. It's a strictly non-smoking house and none of my tennants smoke.
I can smell smoke in my bedroom and so does my girl friend. It has been particularly strong in the evenings in the last few weeks. The biggest change is the removal of the shared chimney stack and attic conversion next door. Their cooker is in the chimney and they have an extractor fan venting out where the chimney stack used to be. I read somewhere that in old terraced houses (ours is early 1900's) the mortar between the bricks cracks and smoke smell comes in there. It is getting so bad we avoid spending time in our bedroom.

Legally is there anything we can do? They might affect my rental business. Practically I know we can use air fresheners, ionisers etc, and we already have an air purifier for asthma but this does not help.

Any advice please??

Thanks

ilovesandy
05-06-2008, 14:22
I totally sympathize...currently I am living with real life versions of patsy and selma from the simpsons. They even look alike! Recently I tried to tell them that the smoke was bothering me and we needed to come up with some sort of compromise. The reaction I got was ridiculous. They actually shouted at me telling me that 'they pay rent therefore they can do what they like'. The reality is neither of them pay for anything, Daddy does. At 22 and 23 to be unemployed for 12 months and sit on their arses smoking all day does not work wonders for our friendship, or what used to be a friendship. I am at a loss of what to do. I have obviously been high-school-bullied into doing nothing. The best part of it is I spoke to my landlord and he agreed that the smoking is so bad that it made his eyes run when he walked in the house. However, as nothing is stated in the contract about no smoking, neither of us have a leg to stand on!:(

cazz1000
25-06-2008, 15:32
Hi gd_1 - I too have problems with cigarette smoke - either coming from downstairs through the floor or through a partition wall (both of which belong to a snooker club and shouldn't be smoking inside!!) and are at my wits end! It's as though somebody is sitting in our flat smoking at least two entire packs of 20 and is impossible to get rid of the smell, even after a full day with the windows wide open. We also only have two sets of windows on one side of the house... and the smell originates from the non-windowed side so this doesn't help in terms of ventilation :(

Other than having lodged an anonymous complaint to local enviro health (not so 'anonymous' though as have already discussed the issue of smoking indoors with the snooker club last week, who of course are denying it's happening - however there's no other possible source it can be coming from!) and phone our renting agency (who inform us 'there's nothing they can do') - I just wonder how you've got along with the various suggestions and whether there's been anything that's worked well? Hopefully I can get the landlord to cough up (I know I have been with the smoke inhalation!) for some kind of air filter...