View Full Version : Irrational dislike of certain words


Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 13:46
There are certain words I just dont like. No particular reason. I just hate the words and they irritate me when I see them.

Top of the list is:

hubby
What a horrible thing to call the one you love!

followed by

numpty
Where did this come from all of a sudden?

baulk

gip (pronounced with a g as in git)

.... there are more but Ive forgotten them. Anybody else have this irrational hate of certain words?

scottf
27-10-2005, 13:48
'sheffield' and 'wednesday' in the same sentance and next to each other!!! ;)

predictable i know :D

cloudybay
27-10-2005, 13:51
Originally posted by alysonpeach

Top of the list is:

hubby
What a horrible thing to call the one you love!



I so HATE that word............it's patronising and very childish..........also the word BEAKER drives me insane......and then there is Juxtaposition..................:rant: :rant:

Babooshka
27-10-2005, 13:54
I hate the word 'nuclear' but mostly because many people can't even pronounce it properly and end up saying 'nuculer'. What's that all about ?!!!

The same with the word 'mischievous'. Many people say 'mischIEvIous', and that is totally wrong and winds me up no end.

Even the word 'something' irritates the hell out of me when someone says 'somethink'. Drives me up the wall.

My next door neighbour says 'bockles' instead of 'bottles'. God almighty, are these words so hard to pronounce???!!!

Anyway, rant over.

dawny1
27-10-2005, 13:54
I hate being called Mrs...... I'm divorced but still get called that and Ms sounds so stupid when you say it.

Rich
27-10-2005, 13:58
For obvious reasons the word Chav seriously winds me up... I just wish certain people on here would get a grip about it FFS! :rant:

And as for calling ME one purely for the fact that I come from S6, that is so retarded it doesn't even merit a response.. :rant: :loopy:

RodimusPrime
27-10-2005, 14:05
Originally posted by Rich
For obvious reasons the word Chav seriously winds me up... I just wish certain people on here would get a grip about it FFS! :rant:

And as for calling ME one purely for the fact that I come from S6, that is so retarded it doesn't even merit a response.. :rant: :loopy:

To be fair, you do seem to respond to it, though. Quite a lot.

poppins
27-10-2005, 14:06
Significant other

Twenty four seven

LOL

Awesome

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 14:07
Originally posted by Babooshka
[

My next door neighbour says 'bockles' instead of 'bottles'. God almighty, are these words so hard to pronounce???!!!

Anyway, rant over. [/B]

What about

hospickle

or ternimus instead of terminus

or Chimley instead of chimney

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 14:09
Originally posted by dawny1
I hate being called Mrs...... I'm divorced but still get called that and Ms sounds so stupid when you say it.

I get that too.

Ive reverted to Miss and delight in saying Miss everytime they call me Mrs. Just because youre a certain age they either cant believe the information they have written in front of them or cant be bothered to ask.

Joanl
27-10-2005, 14:10
When people say sikth instead of sixth.....
Asda had an ad. running where they said they had received an award for the sikth year running. It made me clench my teeth and shut my eyes when it came on.....I was really pleased when they won it for the seventh year running.
:hihi:

chillicat
27-10-2005, 14:11
I have to confess I do find it annoying when people say

"Literally"

and then go on to use a metaphor, e.g. "It was literally raining cats and dogs".

Babooshka
27-10-2005, 14:12
AND......remuneration is NOT reNUMeration. If you can't pronounce it, don't say it!!

Rich
27-10-2005, 14:13
Originally posted by RodimusPrime
To be fair, you do seem to respond to it, though. Quite a lot.

Only to shout at people for being so stupid :rant:

And it's not just me that's fed up of it, the Mods are fed up of it cos it generates work for them from all the reported posts when people start on me about it.

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 14:13
The word "like" inserted into a sentence unnecessarily ...

and

whatever.

Babooshka
27-10-2005, 14:14
Our plumber pronounces 'height' as 'HEIGHTH'...as in pronouncing a 'th' at the end of the word, like in 'width' and 'depth'. I have to bite my tongue!!

AND...people who write and say 'ect' instead of etc....the word is an abbreviation of 'etcetera' and not 'eccetera'

Lea1979
27-10-2005, 14:16
my mum for some reason that no-one will ever know mispronounces Scotland.

I know !!!! Its not difficult is it !!

But for some reason she calls it Scokland.

WHY WHY WHY ?????!!!!!!! :help:

Yodameister
27-10-2005, 14:19
Originally posted by Rich
Only to shout at people for being so stupid :rant:

And it's not just me that's fed up of it, the Mods are fed up of it cos it generates work for them from all the reported posts when people start on me about it.

Rich, you have brought up the subject when you could just as easily not have. You do have to help yourself a bit sometimes.

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 14:25
gingivitis

dont like that either.

RodimusPrime
27-10-2005, 14:27
I despise the word 'festive'.

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 14:27
Ashley on Corrie is the worst offender with "hospickle"

Rich
27-10-2005, 14:30
Originally posted by Yodameister
Rich, you have brought up the subject when you could just as easily not have. You do have to help yourself a bit sometimes.

Um, the topic is about words that you don't like, I posted that I don't like the word Chav, it was perfectly on topic.

Do you see?

segasonic
27-10-2005, 14:34
Schedule as 'shedule'.
Project as 'proeject'.
Process as 'prossess'.

Not a word as such but people who say 'Could care less' should have their tongues cut out.

I blame too much American TV.

TheRedWizard
27-10-2005, 14:36
"prile"

I hate it, it sends shivers down my spine and makes me feel sick!

Angiej
27-10-2005, 14:40
a few of mine are

Bokkle = bottle !
Hospikal =hospital

Chimley = chimney "!

There not that hard i bloody know !!!
:rant:

JBee
27-10-2005, 14:40
I used to have a lecturer who inserted 'you know, kind of like' into every sentence multiple times. He said it so fast it all came out as one word - 'yaknowkinddalike', and he once said it 66 times in just five minutes. It irritated me so much that I actually counted!

I also hate the word 'incidentally' because my dad says it a lot when he's trying to make himself sound clever, but always uses it out of context!

And I hate lots of the words that are used to describe 'lady bits'. Apparently it goes back to a time where women were thought of as sexual preditors sent by the devil to lead god-fearing and honest men astray with their wild demands! Hence the slang words for 'lady bits' and much more insulting than the words for 'man bits'. I'll leave it up to your imagination to work out which words I'm refering to!

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 14:41
joules

purile

... did I spell that correctly?

samc
27-10-2005, 14:44
I hate any words beginning with B.

Totally irrational and had it since a child.

poppins
27-10-2005, 14:45
Originally posted by segasonic






I blame too much American TV.

Might as well blame something you seem to enjoy watching !

AtticusFinch
27-10-2005, 14:51
Originally posted by chillicat
I have to confess I do find it annoying when people say

"Literally"

and then go on to use a metaphor, e.g. "It was literally raining cats and dogs".

I'm the same with the cliche "the fact is that....". It has surpassed "so I turned round and said..." as my most hated cliche, purely because people use it in completely the wrong context, especially during arguments.

For example, two football fans might be having a conversation about their team, and one might say "the fact is that we're not good enough". No, that's not a fact, it's your OPINION.

Another choice for me is the use of "action" as a verb, especially in "office speak". I briefly worked in the civil service, and we were told to right on the notes "_____ actioned". You cannot "action" something. Action is not a verb and never has been. :rolleyes:

Hels
27-10-2005, 14:51
Hee hee hee - just read this thread and I can see i've upset/annoyed/frustrated a few of you!!!!!

I call my significant other - hubby, suppose i've only been doing it fairly recently. I tend not to refer to his name on an open forum like this, and husband sounds a bit formal, so I guess i've adopted the term hubby - as a softer, more affectionate term (certainly not childish).

I hate being called Mrs and always complete forms etc as Ms. I don't see why I should have to indicate my marital status to anyone, life would be so much simpler if titles were either Mr or Ms and leave it at that. Though I know quite a few women who disagree.

I hate the terms/words:

nitty-gritty

level playing field - particularly when women adopt the saying

cadre - and all other military terms used in the workplace

I hear what you are saying - usually means i'm not going to take any notice ....

absolutely - another dismissive response ....

Also: Mam, Babby, Nanna, :gag:

Eclaire
27-10-2005, 14:53
Moist

What's all that about then? But I cringe everytime i hear it...:gag:

Babooshka
27-10-2005, 14:55
To 'action' is a 'verb transitive'.

segasonic
27-10-2005, 14:55
Originally posted by poppins
Might as well blame something you seem to enjoy watching !

Out of interest, what makes you say that? Apart from the Simpsons, Futurama and Family Guy I can't think of any American TV I watch. I watch very little TV regardless of its origin, I prefer to do something a little more interactive than sitting there being brainwashed.

RodimusPrime
27-10-2005, 14:59
Originally posted by Daley
I'm the same with the cliche "the fact is that....". It has surpassed "so I turned round and said..." as my most hated cliche, purely because people use it in completely the wrong context, especially during arguments.

For example, two football fans might be having a conversation about their team, and one might say "the fact is that we're not good enough". No, that's not a fact, it's your OPINION.

Another choice for me is the use of "action" as a verb, especially in "office speak". I briefly worked in the civil service, and we were told to right on the notes "_____ actioned". You cannot "action" something. Action is not a verb and never has been. :rolleyes:

Similar to this (but, for my money, worse) is when people use 'leverage' as a verb. "We really need to leverage this". Firstly, it's 'to lever'. Secondly, they invariably pronounce it in the American way, with a short 'e'.

RodimusPrime
27-10-2005, 15:01
Originally posted by JBee
And I hate lots of the words that are used to describe 'lady bits'. Apparently it goes back to a time where women were thought of as sexual preditors sent by the devil to lead god-fearing and honest men astray with their wild demands! Hence the slang words for 'lady bits' and much more insulting than the words for 'man bits'. I'll leave it up to your imagination to work out which words I'm refering to!

Is it 'mimsy'?

beansfeast
27-10-2005, 15:06
Not that I 'could care less', but the 'fact' is I don't really have any words I dislike, 'like'.
I was drinking out of my 'beaker' the other day when someone called me a 'chav', I just thought 'whatever'! I ended up in 'hospickle' with 'somethink' attached to my face, it was quite 'moist' and sticky.
'Incidentally', I've been in 'hospickle' before. I won't go into the 'nitty gritty' details, but thought it was cute hearing my wife asking for her 'hubby'.

:clap: :clap: :clap:

JBee
27-10-2005, 15:06
Originally posted by RodimusPrime
Is it 'mimsy'?

Nope. i've not heard that one before... but I'm sniggering at my desk now. It's daft, but I like it!!!! :thumbsup:

Hels
27-10-2005, 15:13
The double negative get on my nerves:

"I didn't do nothing" :rant:

evildrneil
27-10-2005, 15:17
Originally posted by Hels
The double negative get on my nerves:

"I didn't do nothing" :rant:

especially given it's usual pronunciation of "dint do nuffink" *shudder*

medusa
27-10-2005, 15:29
Originally posted by alysonpeach
hubby
What a horrible thing to call the one you love!

I actually mean it in the diminuitive and non-respectul sense with regard to soon-to-be-ex-hubby. I used to use it in the sweet and cuddly sense too, to avoid using names, but these days it's sort of a mini-insult every time I type it- I'm afraid I'm just at that stage in the break up/divorce.

I agree wholeheartedly with the insulting nature of words that describe women's bits. There are very few words that I willnot have said in my house (actually, come to think of it, I can only think of one) but I find the c-word so disrespectful that I just don't want to hear it, and to hear it used as an insult makes me SO angry.

lizzmobile
27-10-2005, 16:15
Yay for 'moist' - bleurk!

Gusset
Panties
Bap
Babby (how hard is baby?)
Nitty gritty
Fuddy duddy
Tinky Winky (just kiddin'!)
Stick in the mud
Most happiest and
The most biggest - double supes - were you sleeping in English lessons?

Double negs are worse. Eastender-stylie. Somebody have a word with the scriptwriters puh-leeeese!

And US

Funest (as in we had the funest time)
Winningest (team)
Superlativising words that shouldn't be, and creating gerundives (ing-words) out of others :hihi:

There they go just trying to create a difference again.

LisaO
27-10-2005, 16:34
Originally posted by Eclaire
Moist

What's all that about then? But I cringe everytime i hear it...:gag:

Haha, oh I so relate...that word makes me shudder and I can not for the life of me figure out why!

Another purely irrational one is 'meal'...I will always, always, always say 'we went out for tea' instead of 'we went out for a meal' because I dislike the word that much.

As far as phrases go....(I'm really going to get my head bitten off here because I think it's a Yorkshire thing, or maybe it's common all over the country? I don't know)...but I don't like the tendency of people to say, for instance:

"Do you want this letter posting?"

instead of

"Do you want this letter posted?"
or
"Do you want me to post this letter?"

When I first got to the UK this kind of phrasing always sounded bizarre to me and over a year on I still haven't got used to it. Is there a particular reason for it? I'm intrigued :)

ega95jch
27-10-2005, 16:41
Nothing inherently wrong with the word "pal", but when someone calls me it I go apoplectic! Tried to analyse why, and to me it sounds disrespectful and dismissive. Same with "mate", but to a lesser degree.

On the subject of mispronunciation, the one that really gets me is people who apply aspiration to the letter "H" and say things like "haych ar" for human relations. The same kind of people who say "between you and I" and think they're better than you.

Also "obstropolous" when they mean "obstreperous".

MysTique
27-10-2005, 17:00
Oh dear - I also use the word hubby, but used as a term of endearment as, like Hels said, husband sounds too formal and I, personally, don't like Significant Other.

Other words I'm not keen on are the one used on job application forms such as- must be a 'Team-Player' or be able to think 'outside the box' :suspect:

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 17:06
You hubby users havent upset me! Im not youre hubby. Its just a horrible word.

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 17:09
Originally posted by RodimusPrime
Is it 'mimsy'?

I have an ex boyfriend, who is still a friend, but he calls me "minge" ... it didnt start out as anything rude, just a corruption of my previous surname that went wrong.

dirtybobby
27-10-2005, 17:45
Originally posted by segasonic
Schedule as 'shedule'.
Project as 'proeject'.
Process as 'prossess'.

Not a word as such but people who say 'Could care less' should have their tongues cut out.

I blame too much American TV.

ok, i'm confused.. "proe ject" and "pros sess" i can understand.. almost as bad as when people (americans) say "rowt" for route, or "dar teh" for data..

but "shed yule" is the correct, british pronunciation of schedule :confused: do you think lieutenant should be pronounced "lou tenant"?

100% agree with you on the "could care less" thing.. annoys me even more when people try to defend their use of it, and can't seem to grasp the fundamentals of english syntax..

Zebra
27-10-2005, 17:54
Oh dear, this kind of thread really gets me going. I hate abuse of the English language, although I'm far from perfect in using it myself.
I hate inappropriate sentence structure like ending a sentence with 'so...' which is becoming a national habit.
Use of the wrong word in a context when the correct word is simple.
Mispronunciation of words like 'three', there's someone I work with who says 'free' and she's supposed to set an example in our environment.
The same woman also says 'bockle' and even wrote 'of for hospickle apointment' on our work rota once.
Then the use of 'of' instead of 'have'.
'I would of done it if it were me but it weren't (sic) so .....' So many people don't see how it's wrong.
In fact it isn't really words in particular that get my goat, it's the improper use or pronunciation of them.
It's amazing how often news presenters get things wrong and I really feel they should know better.

And breathe................

Yellowrose
27-10-2005, 19:09
celeb

??????????????????????????

GothicCharm
27-10-2005, 19:17
I really hate the word innit.. it winds me up sooo much

SWFC00
27-10-2005, 20:27
Chav - where did this word spring up from??? It's almost as
annoying as the clowns who go around saying it.

Innit' - :gag: :gag: :gag: :gag: :gag: :gag:
:rant: :rant: :rant: :rant:

deecee
27-10-2005, 21:55
we don't like a lot of words that are now being said by the presenters on tv such as:

sikth for sixth
a new one this week from Kate Thornton is fith meaning fifth
drawrer for drawer
or chest of draws instead of chest of drawers
drawring for drawing
of instead of have
quite fun instead of it was quite good fun
give it up for ( when asking for applause) what's that about and what do you give up?



:rant: :loopy:

Preacher Man
27-10-2005, 22:07
Originally posted by FilthFan
I really hate the word innit.. it winds me up sooo much

thats dirtybobby screwed!!!!


i hate the words;

work
hard, when used before the above
insufficinet funds


the following when used in a sentance

is
it
in
yet


or


please
stop
licking
my
face

Jimbob1989
27-10-2005, 22:24
I'm still waiting to hear the word marshmellow from a certain individual who apparently says it different to most :D

coyleys
27-10-2005, 22:24
"No"
The wife uses it all the time.:mad:

GothicCharm
27-10-2005, 22:25
Originally posted by Jimbob1989
I'm still waiting to hear the word marshmellow from a certain individual who apparently says it different to most :D


not going to happen as I no longer speak to you. and its marshmallow

cloudybay
27-10-2005, 22:25
Originally posted by coyleys
"No"
The wife uses it all the time.:mad:

Get a different wife..........easy.

whatever
27-10-2005, 22:28
Originally posted by alysonpeach
The word "like" inserted into a sentence unnecessarily ...

and

whatever.

Nothing personal i hope. :suspect:

dirtybobby
27-10-2005, 22:34
Originally posted by liamfh
thats dirtybobby screwed!!!!


innit!

GothicCharm
27-10-2005, 22:36
Originally posted by dirtybobby
innit!

aaaaarrrrrrrrrrrgggggggggggghhhhhhhhhh

Bic0
28-10-2005, 03:02
Part of original post by medusa666
-I find the c-word so disrespectful that I just don't want to hear it-
It seems that there is at least one other member on here that will no doubt be gratified to learn that he isn't the only one who objects strongly to the "c-word". :hihi:

Hels
28-10-2005, 03:20
Another 'northern' thing I think, is the incorrect use of the word 'while' for example: I'm working 9 while 5 ....

My number one annoying mispronunciation is when people say ...ink instead of ...ing :rant:

cloudybay
28-10-2005, 04:15
Originally posted by Hels
Another 'northern' thing I think, is the incorrect use of the word 'while' for example: I'm working 9 while 5 ....

My number one annoying mispronunciation is when people say ...ink instead of ...ing :rant:

Rather pedantic Hels? But I agree

RichD
28-10-2005, 06:35
The American pronunciation of 'pross-ess' isn't quite as bad as when they pluralise it. They say 'pross-ess-EEZ', putting all the emphasis on the last syllable.

One that people do over here that annoys me is people trying to be clever and saying 'ambivalent', but instead sounding like tw*ts because they use it in the wrong context and actually mean 'indifferent'.

Oh, and "could of" makes me want to slap people for saying it. :rant:

RichD
28-10-2005, 06:37
Originally posted by Hels
Another 'northern' thing I think, is the incorrect use of the word 'while' for example: I'm working 9 while 5 ....
It could be quite dangerous if they say 'while' instead of 'until' in the wrong circumstances....

"Don't cross while the green man's on, son..." :)

Preacher Man
28-10-2005, 08:36
to be be honest im quite ambivalent to poeples mispronunciations.

*Turbo*
28-10-2005, 08:41
When woman say no:rant:

RodimusPrime
28-10-2005, 09:08
Originally posted by FilthFan
not going to happen as I no longer speak to you. and its marshmallow

Yes, it's most definitely 'marshmallow'; anybody who says 'marshmellow' wants shooting.

More annoying to me than people misusing grammar is people insisting pedantically on aspects of grammar which aren't very important, e.g. split infinitives (an entirely pointless rule imposed on the language by Victorian (?) busybodies who wanted a germanic language to conform to latinate grammar).

Similar to this is when people act as though Americans are deliberately trying to annoy the British by having alternative spellings or pronunciations, or that these are somehow inferior to ours, despite the fact that they are often more logical (what is the purpose of the 'u' in 'colour'?).

Having said that, when they say 'erbs' instead of 'herbs' it cracks me up.

Anyway, the other kind of word which seems to be making an appearance on this thread is the kind of word (like 'gusset' or 'beaker') which is perfectly correct in terms of grammar, spelling and pronunciation, but which inspires a purely visceral aversion, often characterised by an involuntary tightening of the sphincter.

For more discussion of this kind of word, have a look at this (http://www.greenavocado.org.uk/perve/index.asp) .

RodimusPrime
28-10-2005, 09:10
Originally posted by Hels
Another 'northern' thing I think, is the incorrect use of the word 'while' for example: I'm working 9 while 5 ....


I think this is more a regional variation than incorrect use, and I've only ever heard it in Sheffield.

timo
28-10-2005, 09:21
I loathe and abhore words and phrases such as the following; 'feedback', 'learning experience', 'diversity', 'quality time',' sex worker', 'postmodern','gotten', 'bi-curious', 'partner', 'artisan', 'non-judgemental'. Grrrr.

Lea1979
28-10-2005, 09:25
I think 'job' is a positively disgusting word :D

segasonic
28-10-2005, 09:58
Originally posted by dirtybobby
ok, i'm confused.. "proe ject" and "pros sess" i can understand.. almost as bad as when people (americans) say "rowt" for route, or "dar teh" for data..

but "shed yule" is the correct, british pronunciation of schedule :confused: do you think lieutenant should be pronounced "lou tenant"?

100% agree with you on the "could care less" thing.. annoys me even more when people try to defend their use of it, and can't seem to grasp the fundamentals of english syntax..

Oops! I'm not sure if that's a typo or if people who say it incorrectly are starting to get into my subconscious. :blush:

AtticusFinch
28-10-2005, 15:24
Originally posted by Bic0
It seems that there is at least one other member on here that will no doubt be gratified to learn that he isn't the only one who objects strongly to the "c-word". :hihi:

I used to have a female friend whose mission was to get the c-word into general use, so she'd use it frequently within everyday speech. :)

DragonofAna
28-10-2005, 16:47
Only one word I really dislike and that is when someone calls me Hun. Maybe I look like Attilla or something but it really bugs me. So please stop, okay hun?

Dragon

SWFC00
28-10-2005, 20:39
I used to work with this annoying woman who was obsessed with calling people "bud". She made me cringe everytime she said it :gag:. To make thing's worse, she would say it hundreds of times a day!

She was a nice enough person, but in the end everybody disliked her for her annoying habit.

Someone at my current job can't say the word "bottle".
Instead she say's "bockle" :suspect:. She always manages to get this into a conversation atleast a dozen times a day!?
We work in an office with absolutely nothing to do with "bottles"....

hotdogbird
28-10-2005, 21:01
My mother uses the word scockland for scotland and scottish people become scotch!
they hate that don't they!
Someone I know uses the word
'supposably' instead of supposedly (not sure on the spelling) when she's trying to talk posh. I have to bite my tongue to not correct her every time.
I hate being called Love by strangers.
Nicholarse being the biggest criminal for that one on the radio.
I just HATE it!!!

But I love the word Moist. Moist is a fantastic word!
:thumbsup:

hotdogbird
28-10-2005, 21:02
Actually I hate the overuse of the word actually. It's actually very annoying.:rant:

LordChaverly
28-10-2005, 22:41
I think this thread is misnamed, in that most of the dislikes expressed are perfectly rational.

I have a profound dislike of the words comprising 'management speak' – indeed, so many that it would be acutely depressing to elaborate further on this compendium of atrocious English. I have a friend who is a Bulgarian professor and we once – against my better judgement – went to a lecture by a British professor of Management. When the lecture was over, my Bulgarian friend said that he needed to brush up on his English, as he had not understood much of what was said. I told him that there was nothing wrong with his powers of comprehension, as much of what was said had been vacuous gibberish, laden with pretentious phraseology and current management ‘buzzwords’, compared to which the stanzas of Carroll’s .’Jaberwocky’ were models of lucid English usage.

The word I probably hate above all though is ‘post-modern’ (and all its variants). I think it was Tom Wolfe who used the phrase ‘the painted word’ to describe pretentious descriptions of worthless modern art. ‘Post-modern’ is a pretentious painted word par excellence. Even if it originally had a precise meaning (which is very doubtful) the word has long been drained of any useful substance through profligate and seemingly random usage. It appears these days to mean whatever you want it to mean – and often it appears to mean nothing at all. I think there ought to be prizes for spotting the most ludicrous usage of the word. My current favourite is a review article by Robert Darby, which appeared in the Journal of Social History (Fall, 2004) entitled ‘A Post-Modernist Theory of W**king’. I rest my case. :

Bic0
28-10-2005, 22:51
Part of original post by hotdogbird
I hate being called Love by strangers.
Nicholarse being the biggest criminal for that one on the radio.
I just HATE it!!!
Please! Just calm down, Sweet-Cheeks --- Now that stupid expression does make me squirm!

Hope you're paying attention, Nick!!

robbie
28-10-2005, 23:21
circumcision. I do not like that word. or blunt and instrument together

meumeu77
29-10-2005, 14:30
I don't like the word "collar" because I can't pronounce it differently to the word "colour" even though I've lived in England for 6 years and my other half has tried teaching me, I still can't and it annoys me! :mad:

Norton
29-10-2005, 17:42
Belly is a word I really do not like. Just the way people say it "belleh". Yuck.

Even the nicest of words can sound horrible in rough mouths, but belly is a particular bug-bear of mine.

Jelly however is a fine word :)

dirtybobby
29-10-2005, 19:10
Originally posted by RobT
When woman say no:rant:

careful, you don't want to start sounding like sid :hihi:

Yellowrose
11-11-2005, 17:40
NEWBIE

What sort of a word is that?

lizzmobile
11-11-2005, 20:42
I think it's a bit like rookie, Alyson. GRRRRR, whatever happened to trainee? Learners are rook-like now; what's that all about?

katy1981
12-11-2005, 14:41
i hate the words


oi


shut it

stupid (when refering to people)

****

bird or totty (when refering to women)

and a few choice other words that i cannot state on here:hihi:

lizzmobile
15-11-2005, 21:34
I know it's REALLY old English to say this, but I hate it when people say 'yourn' instead of 'yours'. I should like it really 'cos I love all that olde stuff, but I don't.

Lou
16-11-2005, 12:05
Management "buzzwords" bug me,

"Should of" instead of "Should have",

and I've never liked the word "frock". I'm not sure why. I think it's because it sounds really frumpy and old fashioned to me!

Joey
16-11-2005, 12:25
I cringe every time I hear the phrase "emotional rollercoaster". It seems that every interview on television has to include this phrase at least twice, and you can see it coming.

"How have the last two weeks been for you?"

"Oh its been a real ..... " (switch the tv off)

Tim42
16-11-2005, 13:33
Originally posted by segasonic
Schedule as 'shedule'.
Project as 'proeject'.
Process as 'prossess'.

Not a word as such but people who say 'Could care less' should have their tongues cut out.

I blame too much American TV.

Or pronouncing it sKejule

Booch
16-11-2005, 13:59
I cannot abide the word 'coloured':gag:

Tim42
16-11-2005, 14:05
Used to work with a woman who used to say Schewpid for stupid. Also top of the irritating list is the classic BASICALY.

shoegal
16-11-2005, 14:14
Lickle instead of little
Percific instead of specific
:?

chickmonk
16-11-2005, 14:16
The word 'boobies' :gag: should be outlawed.

Any man who uses this word deserves to never get laid again.

Any woman who uses this word is clearly mad.

:gag:

DragonofAna
16-11-2005, 15:10
I get told off for continually using the word "chuck" as in "That's okay chuck".

Must try to think of a different word I suppose.

Dragon

shoegal
16-11-2005, 15:47
Originally posted by chickmonk
The word 'boobies' :gag: should be outlawed.

Any man who uses this word deserves to never get laid again.

Any woman who uses this word is clearly mad.

:gag:

Anyone that inserts the word ''plump' beforehand should be on a register somewhere. Puk!:gag:

chickmonk
16-11-2005, 16:13
Aaaargh!!! :gag:

Should not have mentioned my dislike of word 'boobies' in the office. Now all are saying it and I may puke. :gag:

*runs for the hills*

Chicken Monkey

Lou
17-11-2005, 12:32
Originally posted by shoegal
Percific instead of specific
:?

Ooh, I'm with you on that one!