View Full Version : Yorkies And Southerners.


Jabberwocky
23-06-2010, 13:07
Now I know this subject has been covered in the past and I suppose we came to the conclusion (More or less) that the Southerners/Northerners thing was all in gentle fun... didnt we...?

I live in the midlands and take every opportunity to rip the wee-wee out of my friends and family here because theyre "Southerners!" They calmly explain to me that they actually ARENT southerners, theyre midlanders but I used a little known loophole in the law which states, (and I quote) "Everybody who lives south of Chesterfield is a `Bleeding southerner` and as such, is fair game."

They of course have to try to go one better by claiming that if this is the case then `Everyone NORTH of Chesterfield is a flat cap wearing caveman with permanant grazes on his knuckles from dragging them on the ground as they walk." which in my opinion isnt fair at all!

Any road up, I was about to post this...erm... post on a thread that seemed at the time to be exploring the North/South relationship but I thought `Bugger it!` I`ll start a thread anyway! :

"The southerner thing just then gave me an idea for a thread but it would appear to have been already covered... Which is a pity because the relationship between Yorkies and Southerners is an interesting one. It seems to be a one way thing- the southerners dont really care and barely know about it until they move north, yet Northerners - some of them anyway seem to make extracting the Micheal a life choice and hobby!"


So, my little sugar dumplings. Have attitudes changed in recent years? Is the North /South fun we make of each other only done in fun these days? Or are there some people who actually really dislike people to the north or south of them?

*Peaches*
23-06-2010, 13:20
Northerners are only jealous of us Southerners cos we're much nicer folk :D

Jabberwocky
23-06-2010, 13:21
Northerners are only jealous of us Southerners cos we're much nicer folk :D

Shurrup, you and giz a snog!

JFKvsNixon
23-06-2010, 13:23
I remember when I first came up here I had to explain what a lager top is over and again, usually along with the words, not I don't want a lager shandy.

*Peaches*
23-06-2010, 13:23
Not with that Northern nancy gob!

Jabberwocky
23-06-2010, 13:25
I remember when I first came up here I had to explain what a lager top is over and again, usually along with the words, not I don't want a lager shandy.

A few years ago I was in a pub here in the midlands and I bought a lager for myself and asked for a Coke for the OH...

The barman kept saying `Ceeeeerke? Ceeeeerke?` as if I was speaking another language! I`m yelling `COKE! I WANT A COKE!` and he`s saying Ceeeeeerke?`


In the end I had to pronounce it the way they do here... which is "Kewk."

I`m less than 80 miles down the M1 and its like another bloody country sometimes! :D

Allen
24-06-2010, 01:48
God I wish I hadn't read this thread!
I'm selling up and moving to Wales.....
Is there any hope they will understand me?
I've been learnig a bit of the Welsh language and can say "boyo" with what to me sounds like the right lingo.

Will they understand "any road up" or "cellarheeard" or most importantly "Nathen" when I open mi gob?

GUZZIOWL
24-06-2010, 02:05
God I wish I hadn't read this thread!
I'm selling up and moving to Wales.....
Is there any hope they will understand me?
I've been learnig a bit of the Welsh language and can say "boyo" with what to me sounds like the right lingo.

Will they understand "any road up" or "cellarheeard" or most importantly "Nathen" when I open mi gob?
If tha' talks Caerphilly :hihi: , tha' should bi' o'reight.....:hihi:

Jabberwocky
24-06-2010, 08:14
Just dont say the word `Breadcake.`

I said it here in the midlands once, never heared the last of it. For starters they extract the Micheal out of the length of the word `Cake` and then they have a go at what a Breadcake actually is.

My sis in law was at E Sucks butchers at Margetson shops buying a sarny a few years ago and asked for a salad on a `Cob`... The girl behind the counter looked at her as if she was from Mars or something. I had to translate.

*Peaches*
24-06-2010, 08:19
in Manc its a Baaahn cake, I asked for a sausage sarnie, woman said you mean a baahn I was like huh?

Allen
26-06-2010, 23:42
in Manc its a Baaahn cake, I asked for a sausage sarnie, woman said you mean a baahn I was like huh?

But has tha ever had a Stottie Cake......they are to die for.
Get thisen up Newcastle and South Shields for a tastin.

I'm gunna have to find out what a breadcake is in Wales now.:huh:

charlie9865
27-06-2010, 20:12
Im from chav town (Chatham Kent), I am far from a Chav though. :)
I moved to sheffield 20 yr ago when I was 6, and the things that are said difrent here from down there and even what people eat.

Breadcake = Bread roll
Breakfast, dinner and tea= breakfast, lunch and dinner
Hardly anyone sells savloy sausage here, where as in chatham you would find it hard to get mushy peas.

Mash a cuppa, the first time someone said this to me I imagined getting a potatoe masher and mashing the teabag with it hahaha

I like living here it is ok , but I am at the moment going through home swapper to try get a move back to kent.
As well as at the moment having priority on medical grounds for my disability to move in to a new home in sheffield. Wich ever comes first I will take but I much prefer to go home where my real family and friends are. :)

Rupert_Baehr
27-06-2010, 20:16
... where as in chatham you would find it hard to get mushy peas.



Well, around here if you asked for 'mushy peas' you'd probably be thrown out of the restaurant.

charlie9865
27-06-2010, 20:19
Well, around here if you asked for 'mushy peas' you'd probably be thrown out of the restaurant.

hahahah:hihi:

Alex C.
27-06-2010, 20:23
The two words I always use (despite being told repeatedly that they're not real words) are gennel and breadcake. Lots of fun explaning it always.

There's also the 'Glass' v 'Glarse' debate. I had a great day telling my patriotic southern friend that I say it in the correct, traditional way (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_short_A#Trap-bath_split).

rubydazzler
27-06-2010, 20:29
I much prefer to go home where my real family and friends are. :)I've read some of your posts and you're not having an easy time, are you? Nothing like being 'home' when you're not well. I hope you get somewhere really nice to live down there. x

*Wallace*
27-06-2010, 20:34
Well, around here if you asked for 'mushy peas' you'd probably be thrown out of the restaurant.

Wasn't there some tory numpty in a chippy up here doing his man of the people thing and saw the mushy peas and asked for some of that guacamole :hihi:

Jabberwocky
27-06-2010, 20:36
The two words I always use (despite being told repeatedly that they're not real words) are gennel and breadcake. Lots of fun explaning it always.

There's also the 'Glass' v 'Glarse' debate. I had a great day telling my patriotic southern friend that I say it in the correct, traditional way (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_short_A#Trap-bath_split).

Gennels are Jittys here.

I`m trying to educate them and get them to say Gennel, but... theyre barbarians. They dont even know what a proper fishcake is.

Leoni
27-06-2010, 20:38
There's also the 'Glass' v 'Glarse' debate. I had a great day telling my patriotic southern friend that I say it in the correct, traditional way (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonological_history_of_English_short_A#Trap-bath_split).

Well I'm from Essex, and my accent is about a southern as it could get (although I'm working on getting a sheffield one!!) and I happen to think that it should be said 'glass' and not 'glarse'... the clue is in the spelling. However, I do tend to say 'glarse' just because thats how I've been brought up and it takes a while to lose the habit I guess......

The longer I live in Sheffield, the more things I realise I've been pronouncing wrong for over 20 years!!!

carly83
27-06-2010, 20:46
ok so i was bought up by a southern mother (for 7 years anyway) and a northen father, having lived both down south and up north, so im pretty used to to the lingo of both (as well as 5 years in blackpool as well so about of lancs lingo added in for fun) and 2 step kids who are scottish (so frequent trips there)

well the result seems to be southeners stick a r in every thing ie, barth (bath) glarse (glass).

lancs is more accepting of southeners than yorks but i think thats cause they want there money with it being a brit holiday resort!

and im so use to barm cake for lancs, breadcake for yorks, bread roll for surrey/london and stottie for scotland!

still struggle with alot of the scotish influenced words though this is a facebook status of step daughter friend: coffield has swallowed a dictionary the nite she is using huraaaaaaa big words lol hahaha !!! shes geeinit the megaaa

carly83
27-06-2010, 20:47
oh and yorks gennel, lancs ginnel, down south alley way

*Wallace*
27-06-2010, 20:48
In Scotland where's me friggin hoose gone.

pattricia
27-06-2010, 20:50
In Scotland where's me friggin hoose gone.

I love the Scottish accent but cannot stand the Birmingham accent.

*Wallace*
27-06-2010, 20:52
I love the Scottish accent but cannot stand the Birmingham accent.

It's Scouse for me Patricia drives me mad.

charlie9865
27-06-2010, 20:53
I've read some of your posts and you're not having an easy time, are you? Nothing like being 'home' when you're not well. I hope you get somewhere really nice to live down there. x

ahhh thanks ruby, I am ok still fighting I am running my own business to.
Won't let this thing beat me, Just wished my supposed old mates had of had the same kind of empathy you had. I was getting really ill and suffering depression to and they all thought I was being horrid instead of realising I was sick.

They turned there backs on me when I needed them most. It was awful hence why I am so hell bent on going home to kent now. I have some lovely new friends and only a couple. And in a way it showed me who my true friends really where. I am more happy now as well so there have been some positives and negatives but I will fight on for my kids if not myself they need me. x

pattricia
27-06-2010, 20:54
It's Scouse for me Patricia drives me mad.

Yes that as well , they are both as bad as each other.

carly83
27-06-2010, 21:02
ahhh thanks ruby, I am ok still fighting I am running my own business to.
Won't let this thing beat me, Just wished my supposed old mates had of had the same kind of empathy you had. I was getting really ill and suffering depression to and they all thought I was being horrid instead of realising I was sick.

They turned there backs on me when I needed them most. It was awful hence why I am so hell bent on going home to kent now. I have some lovely new friends and only a couple. And in a way it showed me who my true friends really where. I am more happy now as well so there have been some positives and negatives but I will fight on for my kids if not myself they need me. x

there obviously not worth worrying about, take comfort in knowing its something you wouldn't do to a friend there for making you a much better person than them :)

charlie9865
27-06-2010, 21:04
there obviously not worth worrying about, take comfort in knowing its something you wouldn't do to a friend there for making you a much better person than them :)

Ahhh thanks hun, I am a better person for it. And a lot more happy and have a huge appreciation now for those that where there and are there now.
I am so lucky to of found out what I did, thanks anyways x

SiSiSi
27-06-2010, 21:29
I remember when I first came up here I had to explain what a lager top is over and again, usually along with the words, not I don't want a lager shandy.

Southern Poof!

cressida
27-06-2010, 21:43
I'm from Buxton so I'm a Midlander, I don't think I have an accent although an American lady thought I was from the South of England

Swan_Vesta
27-06-2010, 23:55
I'm a Southerner and proud.

I live in South Yorkshire and like it but I would rather have my kids brought up where they speak like me. My wife won't move down the South because she'd be isolated and all of 'our' mates would be my mates - I can understand that, but I'd prefer them to have a Southern accent. They'd at least sound eductated.

carly83
28-06-2010, 00:05
I'm a Southerner and proud.

I live in South Yorkshire and like it but I would rather have my kids brought up where they speak like me. My wife won't move down the South because she'd be isolated and all of 'our' mates would be my mates - I can understand that, but I'd prefer them to have a Southern accent. They'd at least sound eductated.

are they still quite young? is there any sign of a accent yet?

i can switch between northern and southern giving i had a parent of each and was always between the two places, although i do not do it on purpose but have to adapt to who im speaking to so they understand me :)

Alcoblog
28-06-2010, 02:08
Years back I went into a chip shop with some friends after an evening drinking. The conversation went something like this ;
NASTY PIECE OF WORK IN QUEUE.... 'Nah den dee, put t'wood in t'oyl'
ME (TO MATES) .... ' What this gentleman is trying to say is 'would you kindly close the door?''
NASTY PIECE OF WORK IN QUEUE....'Nah den... wanna feight?'
ME (STUPIDLY) .... 'Seven'
Suffice to say, wether I wanted a fight or not I became involved in one (much against my wishes) :hihi::roll:

Stoatwobbler
28-06-2010, 07:08
Well I'm from Essex, and my accent is about a southern as it could get (although I'm working on getting a sheffield one!!) and I happen to think that it should be said 'glass' and not 'glarse'... the clue is in the spelling. However, I do tend to say 'glarse' just because thats how I've been brought up and it takes a while to lose the habit I guess......

The longer I live in Sheffield, the more things I realise I've been pronouncing wrong for over 20 years!!!

I lived 11 years in Essex and I never really dropped the Sheffield accent. I still miss the place though.