View Full Version : What's the largest item you can carry on a roof rack?


Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:26
A wardrobe? A chest of drawers? I really have no clue on the subject...

Also, are some roof rack ties better than others? Are there any cheapo one's I should stay away from that might snap :o?

sccsux
05-05-2010, 16:28
A wardrobe? A chest of drawers? I really have no clue on the subject...

Depends on the size of the car, and the size/weight of the item(s) being transported.

The owners manual would be the best place to look:thumbsup:.

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:30
Depends on the size of the car, and the size/weight of the item(s) being transported.

The owners manual would be the best place to look:thumbsup:.

It is a Suzuki Wagon and the manual is sooooo long dude, I've had a glance through it but that's about it. :(

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:30
A wardrobe? A chest of drawers? I really have no clue on the subject...

Also, are some roof rack ties better than others? Are there any cheapo one's I should stay away from that might snap :o?

It is very obvious that you are considering transporting something really stupid , probably dangerous and almost certainly illegal on your roof rack. COME ON........SPIT IT OUT....TELL US WHAT IT IS!:roll:

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:33
It is very obvious that you are considering transporting something really stupid , probably dangerous and almost certainly illegal on your roof rack. COME ON........SPIT IT OUT....TELL US WHAT IT IS!:roll:

Hey I'm just scouting so I can make my roof rack useful... honest.









Not that I'd tell you what it was anyway :D

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:33
Is it a corpse?:(

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:34
Is it a corpse?:(

Carry on being rude and unhelpful and it very well could be... :D

sccsux
05-05-2010, 16:35
It is a Suzuki Wagon and the manual is sooooo long dude, I've had a glance through it but that's about it. :(

I doubt whether anyone will be able to give you a definitive answer then, as all vehicle have different weight (laden & unladen) weights.

Whatever you decide, make sure the load is secure and not overhanging etc.

There should be a section in the owners manual (not workshop manual) that contains all the weight restrictions for the vehicle:thumbsup:

Anna Glypta
05-05-2010, 16:36
Probably something a little smaller than this..

http://image24.webshots.com/24/9/77/6/94597706wFIrON_fs.jpg

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:37
Carry on being rude and unhelpful and it very well could be... :D

Awwww....I really do not think that I said anything to make you feel suicidal.:cool:

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:37
I doubt whether anyone will be able to give you a definitive answer then, as all vehicle have different weight (laden & unladen) weights.

Whatever you decide, make sure the load is secure and not overhanging etc.

There should be a section in the owners manual (not workshop manual) that contains all the weight restrictions for the vehicle:thumbsup:

I was thinking more along the lines of size rather than weight. For example a wardrobe weighs less than a fridge, but I'm not sure if its appropriate to carry such a large object on top of a car?

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:39
Probably something a little smaller than this..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuMKyZEk8ds

That ain't real man. :suspect:

Rupert_Baehr
05-05-2010, 16:40
The manual will tell you the maximum weight you can carry on the roof rack.

The roof rack (if it didn't come with the car) may have its own limits.

According to this link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Suzuki-Wagon-Roof-Rails-Lockable/dp/B001HRW2F6) the roof bars (and the vehicle itself?) have a max load of 50Kg.

My ex and I used to deal in pine furniture. - I've seen older model Volvo 240s fitted with Ladder racks (typical antique dealer rig) loaded up half-way to the sky with furniture (probably well over the manufacturer's limit.)

Perhaps not a good idea nowadays, because if the car is overloaded and there's an accident, you'll probably be done under 'construction and use' and your insurance company might not be too happy.

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:41
The manual will tell you the maximum weight you can carry on the roof rack.

The roof rack (if it didn't come with the car) may have its own limits.

According to this link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Suzuki-Wagon-Roof-Rails-Lockable/dp/B001HRW2F6) the roof bars (and the vehicle itself?) have a max load of 50Kg.

My ex and I used to deal in pine furniture. - I've seen older model Volvo 240s fitted with Ladder racks (typical antique dealer rig) loaded up half-way to the sky with furniture (probably well over the manufacturer's limit.)

Perhaps not a good idea nowadays, because if the car is overloaded and there's an accident, you'll probably be done under 'construction and use' and your insurance company might not be too happy.

Thanks. Forget weight a minute, is there any limit on measurements?

Number Six
05-05-2010, 16:42
It depends on the density of the item. In theory you could put a mashoosive box of bubble wrap on there. The aerodynamics would be terrible though.

If you can see where you are going, and the load is properly secured and doesn't exceed the max. roof weight for your car or the roof rack and it has appropriate warnings on the bits that stick out either end of the car I guess you're ok.

You might need a police escort if it is very wide I suppose.

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:43
Thanks. Forget weight a minute, is there any limit on measurements?

It's a kingsized bed isn't it? I can TELL!:D
It will overlap by miles!

HeadingNorth
05-05-2010, 16:44
Thanks. Forget weight a minute, is there any limit on measurements?

I don't think the luggage is allowed to be bigger than the car. Whether the manufacturer's regulations have any other restriction than that, I don't know.

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:44
It depends on the density of the item. In theory you could put a mashoosive box of bubble wrap on there. The aerodynamics would be terrible though.

If you can see where you are going, and the load is properly secured and doesn't exceed the max. roof weight for your car or the roof rack and it has appropriate warnings on the bits that stick out either end of the car I guess you're ok.

You might need a police escort if it is very wide I suppose.

Cool, though how on earth do you go about weighing something. Say I bought a piece of furniture off someone on here and they don't have the original packaging/ manual... how do I know how much it weighs? :confused:

Parkwood
05-05-2010, 16:45
What's the largest item you can carry on a roof rack?


Your Mother-in-law.

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:45
It's a kingsized bed isn't it? I can TELL!:D
It will overlap by miles!

Actually I was thinking more along the lines of a wardrobe. ;)

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:47
I don't think the luggage is allowed to be bigger than the car. Whether the manufacturer's regulations have any other restriction than that, I don't know.

Is there a law related to the subject? If there is where can I read up on it? Don't want to give the powleese any excuses.

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:47
Actually I was thinking more along the lines of a wardrobe. ;)

No problem with weight then.

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:49
No problem with weight then.

Yes but what about size/ length man?? Pay attention! :mad:

HeadingNorth
05-05-2010, 16:50
Is there a law related to the subject?

There must be some legal avenues - imagine somebody trying to move an object 200 feet long on top of a car and the police would be sure to find something they could be arrested for.

However I don't know exactly what those laws are. You could try googling "roof rack traffic law britain" or some variation thereof.

Rupert_Baehr
05-05-2010, 16:50
I was thinking more along the lines of size rather than weight. For example a wardrobe weighs less than a fridge, but I'm not sure if its appropriate to carry such a large object on top of a car?

If the weight's OK, the size shouldn't be a problem - unless you go under one of those car park barriers designed to stop camper vans from entering. ;)

As for 'tie downs' if I was going to carry 50Kg, I would use tie-downs which were rated at 300Kg (and I'd use a few of them, too.) That would cope with a 6G stop (though I don't know whether the roof bars would cope with that.) - I tend to go for 'overkill';). )

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 16:53
Thanks guys. I still have this problem though:

Cool, though how on earth do you go about weighing something. Say I bought a piece of furniture off someone on here and they don't have the original packaging/ manual... how do I know how much it weighs? :confused:

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:55
Yes but what about size/ length man?? Pay attention! :mad:

OP was.....LARGEST....which usually suggests weight!
OK....it will very probably be illegal but if you tie it down properly and transport it when it is quiet you will very probably not get caught. If you bomb down the M1 with it on the outside lane doing 90mph...you probably will get caught.
If it is local , the police would probably just turn a blind eye if they saw you anyhow.

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 16:56
The weight will NOT be a problem. Wardrobes are light.

NoddyHolder
05-05-2010, 16:56
The size of the object should be no wider or longer than the car in other words it shouldnt overhang its not a hard or fast rule but if a bobby sees it and he feels that way out he will do you simple as,as for the weight it varies according to the vehicle again it all depends on the bobby but he will have a greater tendency to pull you if he suspects the weight is over the limit rather than on physical size

NoddyHolder
05-05-2010, 16:57
Thanks guys. I still have this problem though:
On that problem find something similar for sale on Argos etc and you will be able to get a rough estimate

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 17:04
On that problem find something similar for sale on Argos etc and you will be able to get a rough estimate

Excellent idea. :thumbsup:

Rupert_Baehr
05-05-2010, 17:07
If it's a pine wardrobe (as opposed to a humongous Oak wardrobe) and it's about 'standard' width (roughly 4 ft wide) and about 6ft high and 2-3ft deep it's probably going to weigh well under 50Kg.

A ladder rack is the ideal sort of rack (lots of cross-bars to support the item) but a pair of roof bars will be OK (you might want to put a bit of plywood under it if you're worried - though unless you're planning on hauling the furniture over a really long distance, it shouldn't be a problem.)

If, however, the wardrobe was originally a 'flat pack' item and it's made of chipboard, you will have to weigh it. (A bathroom scale?)

I've got an (old and rather large) chipboard wardrobe and it weighs well over 100kg.

Number Six
05-05-2010, 17:08
Regulation 11 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 refers to the permitted overhang on certain classes of vehicles

Heavy motor car and motor car - the maximum overhang is 60 percent of the distance between the transverse plane which passes through the centre or centres of the foremost wheel or wheels and the transverse plane which passes through the foremost point from which the overhang is to be measured.


Regulation 8 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 creates the maximum permitted overall width of vehicles.

A motor vehicle - maximum width 2.55 metres.

A trailer drawn by a motor vehicle having a maximum gross weight exceeding 3500 kg - maximum width 2.55 metres.

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 17:10
Regulation 11 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 refers to the permitted overhang on certain classes of vehicles

Heavy motor car and motor car - the maximum overhang is 60 percent of the distance between the transverse plane which passes through the centre or centres of the foremost wheel or wheels and the transverse plane which passes through the foremost point from which the overhang is to be measured.


Regulation 8 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 creates the maximum permitted overall width of vehicles.

A motor vehicle - maximum width 2.55 metres.

A trailer drawn by a motor vehicle having a maximum gross weight exceeding 3500 kg - maximum width 2.55 metres.

I have to go now, I'll have to try to get my head round that gobbledygook later. :hihi:

Ta.

Number Six
05-05-2010, 17:12
I have to go now, I'll have to try to get my head round that gobbledygook later. :hihi:

Ta.

I copied and pasted. I think it means it can overhang by 60% of the distance from the middle of your front wheel to the end of the vehicle, or the end of the roofrack, whichever is shortest - assuming it's all tied down ok.

Photofit Ed
05-05-2010, 17:12
Just buy another wardrobe cheapskate!

NoddyHolder
05-05-2010, 17:13
Regulation 11 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 refers to the permitted overhang on certain classes of vehicles

Heavy motor car and motor car - the maximum overhang is 60 percent of the distance between the transverse plane which passes through the centre or centres of the foremost wheel or wheels and the transverse plane which passes through the foremost point from which the overhang is to be measured.


Regulation 8 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 creates the maximum permitted overall width of vehicles.

A motor vehicle - maximum width 2.55 metres.

A trailer drawn by a motor vehicle having a maximum gross weight exceeding 3500 kg - maximum width 2.55 metres.
Give over how do you expect the average plod to understand that..he will do you and if you try to quote anything like that to him you will probably get a slap for your trouble

alex3659
05-05-2010, 17:14
The beverly hillbillies got quite a lot on their roofrack.

heavydog
05-05-2010, 17:16
suggestions to be safe. 1 item does not fit outside roof rack. 2. 2 people can lift item easily. 3. tie it securely.

Parkwood
05-05-2010, 17:40
The beverly hillbillies got quite a lot on their roofrack.Including Mother-in-Law (Granny Clampit).:hihi:

Amaranthus
05-05-2010, 18:18
What shops in Sheffield can I get roof rack ties from?? :help:

buddysbuddy
05-05-2010, 18:22
Yes but what about size/ length man?? Pay attention! :mad:

see this proves that size does matter!!!