View Full Version : NHS Career, how much wages


micksheff
07-06-2005, 09:31
I and a few friends are thinking about a career move to the NHS, does anyone know what the wages are and what sort of training we would need, bareing in mind that we have day jobs.

Cyclone
07-06-2005, 09:34
as what, doctors, nurses, orderlies, support staff of various persuasions?

micksheff
07-06-2005, 09:43
Originally posted by Cyclone
as what, doctors, nurses, orderlies, support staff of various persuasions?

Yes all careers please.

Ann*
07-06-2005, 10:25
Originally posted by micksheff
I and a few friends are thinking about a career move to the NHS, does anyone know what the wages are and what sort of training we would need, bareing in mind that we have day jobs.
Most NHS posts are going through "Agenda For Change" at the moment, which means that grades are being matched to particular jobs. At the moment, there seems to be a lot of downgrading of jobs, so it may be worthwhile checking with your local NHS Authority to see at what stage they are at in Agenda For Change.

Rebecca
07-06-2005, 10:33
http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/

Cyclone
07-06-2005, 10:54
Originally posted by micksheff
Yes all careers please.

are you qualified for all their careers? It may look all well and good to decide to be a surgeon and earn (guessing) 60 - 100 k/year, but the training will take a long time and you'll need to support yourself in the meantime.

micksheff
07-06-2005, 11:04
Originally posted by Cyclone
are you qualified for all their careers? It may look all well and good to decide to be a surgeon and earn (guessing) 60 - 100 k/year, but the training will take a long time and you'll need to support yourself in the meantime.

No we are not qualified but then neither were surgeons, doctors, porters, nurses, denticians, etc before training.

Yeah I wonder what sort of training is available, i.e home study, open university. We need to keep our day jobs to support our selves.

I know of someone at 40 whom was accepted for training as a doctor after doing some open uni study.

micksheff
07-06-2005, 11:05
Originally posted by Ann_x
Most NHS posts are going through "Agenda For Change" at the moment, which means that grades are being matched to particular jobs. At the moment, there seems to be a lot of downgrading of jobs, so it may be worthwhile checking with your local NHS Authority to see at what stage they are at in Agenda For Change.

Thanks for that Ann, some really good information.

micksheff
07-06-2005, 11:06
Originally posted by Rebecca
http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/

Cheers Rebecca

Cyclone
07-06-2005, 11:08
I actually know someone at the moment who has decided to go into medicine (he's a safety engineer at the moment).
He's currently sitting A-levels whilst keeping his current job (day release to college I believe).
Once he's got his A-levels he's provisionally been accepted onto a medicine degree (pending results). I think it's then 4 years degree and 2 or 3 years practical experience as a junior Dr before being fully qualified.

It's not the sort of path you commit too lightly and the salary should certainly be only a part (small part) of the consideration.

investigator
07-06-2005, 11:25
I can probably get you the information you require if you ask something specific. 'Agenda for Change' is, as already mentioned, very relevant and more information can be found here (http://tinyurl.com/bmpdt)

nobikejohn
08-06-2005, 06:11
doctors and consultants are exempt from agenda for change (a4c), they are negotiating their own new contracts, which of course will be very benificial to them
nurses and related staff are going through a4c in phase 2 which will end in the next few months
profession supplementary to medicine radiology. pharmacy will be in phase 3 starting in oct 05
biomidical scientists have been put back 4 years as of oct 04 to sort out the thorny problem of out of hours payments as they will be the most affected by a4c

the rates of pay you will be given in some jobs may be only provisional until the gradings are sorted out. your local hospitals human resource dept will be of great help as some jobs have been graded

PhilipB
08-06-2005, 08:22
Want a word of advice?
As a professionally qulaified NHS employee for nearly 38 years, don't do it unless you're planning on joining the medical profession or being a senior manager.

A4C is a sop. ALL NHS staff were "invited" to join but surprise surprise the medical and dental staff refused, arranged their own changes and now someones got to pay for it.

The NHS is a vehicle for the medical profession with more and more managers.
Somewhere down the list of priorities there comes the welfare of the patient.

To answer your question, first decide what you want to do, then avoid the NHS.
Ask yourself why it can't recruit and retain staff?
Why is staff morale at its all time low?
Don't ask the grey suits who don't set foot in a hospital week in week out, ask someone who's had first hand experience.

Wages and conditions? Try another industry, ANY industry.

Sorry to be so negative, just speaking from experience.

sam1984
09-06-2005, 06:48
I am a student nurse, we earn absolute peanuts,like 460 a month...wahoo.
Unfortunately its what ive always wanted to do, so at the moment Im studying full time.
The only way you would be able to work alongside would be to work in the evenings after uni or work placements.....and thats if you have time to with all your assignments.
Some people can cope with doing that, but I know a lot of people who have had to take time out to earn more money, or have left the course completely due to the strain.

Yes I know this all sounds very negative, but thats the reality.It takes 3 years of being paid an apalling wage to become a qualified nurse, if you reallr, really want to do it, like I do then you'll get through it, but if you only want to join the NHS as a way of earning money, then seriously steer clear.You'll not get rich quick by becoming a nurse.Im only doing the job because I love it.

PhilipB
09-06-2005, 08:35
Originally posted by sam1984
I am a student nurse, we earn absolute peanuts,like 460 a month...wahoo.
Unfortunately its what ive always wanted to do, so at the moment Im studying full time.
The only way you would be able to work alongside would be to work in the evenings after uni or work placements.....and thats if you have time to with all your assignments.
Some people can cope with doing that, but I know a lot of people who have had to take time out to earn more money, or have left the course completely due to the strain.

Yes I know this all sounds very negative, but thats the reality.It takes 3 years of being paid an apalling wage to become a qualified nurse, if you reallr, really want to do it, like I do then you'll get through it, but if you only want to join the NHS as a way of earning money, then seriously steer clear.You'll not get rich quick by becoming a nurse.Im only doing the job because I love it.

Sam, it's people like you, and thousands more like you, that enable the NHS to function.
Long gone are the ideallistic principles that I once held.

All the very best in your studies, have known a lot of student nurses and they all say as you do.
Treated as a skivvy, paid a pittance and expected to deliver a first rate service.

The rewards are there but they are certainly not financial.

sam1984
09-06-2005, 10:05
Thanks Philip! Its nice when somebody recognises the fact that nurses actually do care about their work, and did a lot of hard slog to get where they are.

The NHS does get a lot of bad press, but we have to keep on working and we really do try our best to deliver quality care even though the demand for healthcare in this country far outnumbers the ammount of staff and ammount of money allocated for it!

thanks again Phil

P.S MICKSHEFF
If you really do feel that working for the NHS is the thing for you then go for it.If your heart is in it, then you will be rewarded in some ways, even if its not financial!

good luck xxx

AGB1
12-06-2005, 13:54
Originally posted by micksheff
No we are not qualified but then neither were surgeons, doctors, porters, nurses, denticians, etc before training.

Yeah I wonder what sort of training is available, i.e home study, open university. We need to keep our day jobs to support our selves.

I know of someone at 40 whom was accepted for training as a doctor after doing some open uni study.

Sheffield Medical School have a very open admissions policy and are very keen to accept people from a wide range of experiences. They're moving away from the young 18 year old with 10 A's at A level as they've realised that doesnt necessarily mean they'll make good doctors.
However medicine is a full-time course and the only way to study it is full time with 100% commitment. You cant do it via Open University or with home study, such is the nature of the course. So if you're planning to train as a doctor I'd encourage you, but make sure you can afford it (both time wise, dedication wise and financially) first.

Alex

moon
13-06-2005, 08:13
what about admin jobs at hospitals?

any info plz?

ant tips for a first time applier in2 admin job at hosp?

thanks

*Turbo*
14-06-2005, 12:09
Originally posted by sam1984
I am a student nurse, we earn absolute peanuts,like 460 a month...wahoo.
Unfortunately its what ive always wanted to do, so at the moment Im studying full time.
The only way you would be able to work alongside would be to work in the evenings after uni or work placements.....and thats if you have time to with all your assignments.
Some people can cope with doing that, but I know a lot of people who have had to take time out to earn more money, or have left the course completely due to the strain.

Yes I know this all sounds very negative, but thats the reality.It takes 3 years of being paid an apalling wage to become a qualified nurse, if you reallr, really want to do it, like I do then you'll get through it, but if you only want to join the NHS as a way of earning money, then seriously steer clear.You'll not get rich quick by becoming a nurse.Im only doing the job because I love it.

Sam, out of interest what did you have to do to become a student nurse?

Reason i ask is because i would of thought with it being a 3 year course its the same as joe bloggs doing a degree, except you do get paid a wage...though not a fantastic amount. Therefore my thinking is you get paid to train in the job you love and obtain a nursing qualification which i thought would be on par with a degree and get a wage?

Correct me if i'm wrong...i honestly do not know!!

Cheers

Rob

richard
19-06-2005, 10:18
try http://www.nhsjobs.net where lots of jobs are listed with wages... http://www.healthjobsuk.com also has more indepth stuff on different areas of the NHS.

nailbag
01-07-2005, 20:46
well to be perfectly honest i have worked for the nhs as an anaesthetic technician for 16 years, and quite frankly i love it, no 2 days are the same, i earn 25k a year, i get 8 weeks annual leave a year, i work with a great team, term time contracts are available for staff that need them, i feel worthwhile in my job, will never be unemployed and pretty much have the flexibility to work in any city in the uk i choose.

we deliver top quality care to patients irrespective of financial restraints.

one person said to me that the nhs is bleeding the country dry, however i feel the country is bleeding the nhs dry.

i could think of worse paid, undervalued, non stable jobs than the one i have.