View Full Version : Well I'll go to't foot of our stairs!


slickwitch
04-06-2008, 10:09
My mum used to use this as an expression of her surprise. Anyone else heard it?

As expressions of surprise go, my auntie's favourite is "Bugger me!". Now an invitation for anyone listening to sodomise her seems a bit risky for a ninety year old. Not so much with the clever my auntie Lil:loopy::hihi:

schizodoor
04-06-2008, 10:12
My granddad and nannan used to say it, my mum to and I must admit i've been guilty of it too!

alex3659
04-06-2008, 10:12
when we used to get in trouble , my mother would shout " wait till I get hold of you, I'll swing for you one of these days"

Sultana
04-06-2008, 10:16
"I'll go to foot of our stairs", or "I'll go to our house" are regular sayings in our household

foxforcefive
04-06-2008, 10:17
Never heard it, never used it.

I was discussing the 'hair of the dog' or 'air of the dog' the other week because we couldn't fathom out which was correct, or where it originates from, anyone got any ideas?

Seems daft to start another thread so, hope you don't mind Slick. I'm sure I'll be the first to know if you do.

Chopsie
04-06-2008, 10:20
My family use it - I was always under the impression it was a Lancashire thing, but perhaps not.

Why anyone would go to the bottom of the stairs to express surprise at something has always puzzled me though, I must say.

Jabberwocky
04-06-2008, 10:21
A colleague and I used to take the Foot of our stairs thing to the extreme, saying `Well Ill go to the foot of our stairs`, then the next one would be `Well Ill go to the bottom of our garden`, the next one `Well Ill go to the end of our street` and so on until we were saying things like `Well Ill go to the outer borders of the solar system`. We got as far as the Andromeda galaxy before the boss slapped us.

schizodoor
04-06-2008, 10:23
Never heard it, never used it.

I was discussing the 'hair of the dog' or 'air of the dog' the other week because we couldn't fathom out which was correct, or where it originates from, anyone got any ideas?

Seems daft to start another thread so, hope you don't mind Slick. I'm sure I'll be the first to know if you do.

It's 'hair' of the dog. Comes from 'the hair of the dog that bit you cures all...' I believe. I think it comes from the old belief that using the hair cures the nasty effects of the bite.

Tricky
04-06-2008, 10:25
Never heard it, never used it.

I was discussing the 'hair of the dog' or 'air of the dog' the other week because we couldn't fathom out which was correct, or where it originates from, anyone got any ideas?

Seems daft to start another thread so, hope you don't mind Slick. I'm sure I'll be the first to know if you do.

The hair of the dog that bit you: The origin of the phrase is literal, and comes from an erroneous method of treatment of a rabid dog bite by placing hair from the dog in the bite wound. ref (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_of_the_dog)

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 10:26
The hair of the dog that bit you: The origin of the phrase is literal, and comes from an erroneous method of treatment of a rabid dog bite by placing hair from the dog in the bite wound. ref (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_of_the_dog)

Well. Bugger me. I din't know that.

Tricky
04-06-2008, 10:28
Well. Bugger me. I din't know that.

OK, as long as you don't bite.

nick2
04-06-2008, 10:30
The hair of the dog that bit you: The origin of the phrase is literal, and comes from an erroneous method of treatment of a rabid dog bite by placing hair from the dog in the bite wound. ref (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_of_the_dog)

and what was the cure for the infection caused by sticking manky dog hair in an open wound called, "the flagellum of the microbe that rotted your arm off" ?

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 10:31
and what was the cure for the infection caused by sticking manky dog hair in an open wound called, "the flagellum of the microbe that rotted your arm off" ?

tee hee:hihi::hihi:

foxforcefive
04-06-2008, 10:33
Thanks guys, I think I've actually heard something like that before, just filed it in back of my head and couldn't retrieve it.

cressida
04-06-2008, 10:37
I heard it in 'Last of the summer wine' Wally, the husband (deceased) of Nora Batty used to say it.

Norbert
04-06-2008, 10:39
My mum used to use [Well I'll go to't foot of our stairs!] as an expression of her surprise. Anyone else heard it?


Very much so, infact our entire family life was constructed out of strange phrases like that:

When asking what's for tea:
"A run at the cellar door and a bite of the knob!"

When leaving part of ones meal:
"We don't buy little horses to save corn."

"Bleedin' 'ummer!" Was my grandma's worst swearword, whatever 'ummer means? I was also amused by my her, when telling the time, saying "five and twenty past" instead of "twentyfive past". She was born in 1897.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 10:39
I heard it in 'Last of the summer wine' Wally, the husband (deceased) of Nora Batty used to say it.

What from beyond the grave!:o Now that is surprising indeed!

Grandad.Malky
04-06-2008, 10:44
My Grandmother once said it’s a “Pig in a poke”, I have never heard the expression since . :huh:

Tricky
04-06-2008, 10:51
My Grandmother once said it’s a “Pig in a poke”, I have never heard the expression since . :huh:

Related (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_in_a_poke) to 'Letting the cat out of the bag', which I never knew.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 10:52
Related (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_in_a_poke) to 'Letting the cat out of the bag', which I never knew.

You sit at home talking rubbish to yourself all day don't you?:hihi:

Gripper Stebson
04-06-2008, 10:57
Is this a thread for the OAP's of SF? :nod:

Tricky
04-06-2008, 11:01
You sit at home talking rubbish to yourself all day don't you?:hihi:

Home? No, amazingly somebody pays me to do it.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 11:05
Is this a thread for the OAP's of SF? :nod:

No it's for the great and the good so don't let the door hit you on the way out my dear.

nick2
04-06-2008, 11:07
One of my favourite old person sayings is "a bit of how's your father", it makes no sense but you know what they are talking about, and you know it's something rude.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 11:08
One of my favourite old person sayings is "a bit of how's your father", it makes no sense but you know what they are talking about, and you know it's something rude.

Oooh yes. Along with "his bit o' fluff"

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 11:10
And not wishing to have a million people chase me with sticks for racism, can anyone else remember when it was common for the old 'uns to say "She's run off with a black man" ? Even as a little girl I somehow knew this was naughty.

Gripper Stebson
04-06-2008, 11:10
No it's for the great and the good so don't let the door hit you on the way out my dear.


Well i'll be damned!
I'll be off t'foot of arr stairs then. :)

nick2
04-06-2008, 11:12
Oooh yes. Along with "his bit o' fluff"

a.k.a. "dolly bird"

Gripper Stebson
04-06-2008, 11:13
And not wishing to have a million people chase me with sticks for racism, can anyone else remember when it was common for the old 'uns to say "She's run off with a black man" ? Even as a little girl I somehow knew this was naughty.


Apparently it was less embarrassing to say this, than admit
she had gone to live in Rotherham.

Tricky
04-06-2008, 11:15
One of my favourite old person sayings is "a bit of how's your father", it makes no sense but you know what they are talking about, and you know it's something rude.

I found some quite dull and slightly unconvincing explanations, but I also found this one, less dull but more unconvincing:

According to Michael Kelly, a writer and historian in New Zealand, "the origin of the expression 'how's your father' can be traced back to Victorian times. In those days any man with a daughter was so protective of her virtue that he would take extraordinary measures to safeguard it. Unmarried girls would be kept within the bosom of their family as much as possible, chaperoned on excursions, and on those occasions when they were let out of bounds for social events, their fathers would often accompany them discreetly by hiding underneath their voluminous skirts ready to pounce on any man who transgressed the bounds of propriety.

However, a father with more than one daughter couldn't be everywhere at once. Thus, a suitor having a discreet vis-a-vis with his beloved would cautiously ascertain her father's whereabouts by asking, 'And how is your father?' If her father was currently under her skirts, she would glance downwards and reply, 'My father is very well, thank you, and as alert and vigorous as ever, and maintains his interest in rusty castrating implements.' Her beau would then say, 'I have always had the greatest respect for your father, and of course for you. Let us hold hands and think about the Queen for a while.' If, on the other hand, her father was elsewhere, she would reply, 'The mad old ******* is currently stationed between my sister Constance's thighs. Let us go into the garden and rut like stoats.'

schizodoor
04-06-2008, 11:17
And not wishing to have a million people chase me with sticks for racism, can anyone else remember when it was common for the old 'uns to say "She's run off with a black man" ? Even as a little girl I somehow knew this was naughty.

Oh this was a big one when I was growing up, If I ever dared ask where anyone was that was my reply and uncle used to tell us all he was going to run off with an African Queen and leave us.

schizodoor
04-06-2008, 11:18
I found some quite dull and slightly unconvincing explanations, but I also found this one, less dull but more unconvincing:

According to Michael Kelly, a writer and historian in New Zealand, "the origin of the expression 'how's your father' can be traced back to Victorian times. In those days any man with a daughter was so protective of her virtue that he would take extraordinary measures to safeguard it. Unmarried girls would be kept within the bosom of their family as much as possible, chaperoned on excursions, and on those occasions when they were let out of bounds for social events, their fathers would often accompany them discreetly by hiding underneath their voluminous skirts ready to pounce on any man who transgressed the bounds of propriety.

However, a father with more than one daughter couldn't be everywhere at once. Thus, a suitor having a discreet vis-a-vis with his beloved would cautiously ascertain her father's whereabouts by asking, 'And how is your father?' If her father was currently under her skirts, she would glance downwards and reply, 'My father is very well, thank you, and as alert and vigorous as ever, and maintains his interest in rusty castrating implements.' Her beau would then say, 'I have always had the greatest respect for your father, and of course for you. Let us hold hands and think about the Queen for a while.' If, on the other hand, her father was elsewhere, she would reply, 'The mad old ******* is currently stationed between my sister Constance's thighs. Let us go into the garden and rut like stoats.'

That's just had me in hysterics, I don't care if it's true or not the visions are unbeatable! :hihi:

nick2
04-06-2008, 11:21
My uncle used to say "Jesus H Christ", I was convinced for years that our lord had a middle name like Henry or something.

schizodoor
04-06-2008, 11:22
My uncle used to say "Jesus H Christ", I was convinced for years that our lord had a middle name like Henry or something.

My Granddad insisted his middle name was Harry.

foxforcefive
04-06-2008, 11:22
I found some quite dull and slightly unconvincing explanations, but I also found this one, less dull but more unconvincing:

According to Michael Kelly, a writer and historian in New Zealand, "the origin of the expression 'how's your father' can be traced back to Victorian times. In those days any man with a daughter was so protective of her virtue that he would take extraordinary measures to safeguard it. Unmarried girls would be kept within the bosom of their family as much as possible, chaperoned on excursions, and on those occasions when they were let out of bounds for social events, their fathers would often accompany them discreetly by hiding underneath their voluminous skirts ready to pounce on any man who transgressed the bounds of propriety.

However, a father with more than one daughter couldn't be everywhere at once. Thus, a suitor having a discreet vis-a-vis with his beloved would cautiously ascertain her father's whereabouts by asking, 'And how is your father?' If her father was currently under her skirts, she would glance downwards and reply, 'My father is very well, thank you, and as alert and vigorous as ever, and maintains his interest in rusty castrating implements.' Her beau would then say, 'I have always had the greatest respect for your father, and of course for you. Let us hold hands and think about the Queen for a while.' If, on the other hand, her father was elsewhere, she would reply, 'The mad old ******* is currently stationed between my sister Constance's thighs. Let us go into the garden and rut like stoats.'

Brilliant....

Jessica23
04-06-2008, 11:23
My uncle used to say "Jesus H Christ", I was convinced for years that our lord had a middle name like Henry or something.

I say that. And Christ on a bike. No idea why.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 11:25
My little girl still wonders why we haven't got a dog as Lord Slick of Slickness often tells her he's "going to see a man about a dog" and all he ever gets is p***ed!

Sultana
04-06-2008, 11:30
My Dad used to say "I'm just going to turn mi bike round", meaning he was going to the bathroom to "inspect the plumbing" lol

nick2
04-06-2008, 11:32
My Dad used to say "I'm just going to turn mi bike round", meaning he was going to the bathroom to "inspect the plumbing" lol

My favourite loo related one is "nip off a bum loaf" :)

Tricky
04-06-2008, 11:36
My favourite loo related one is "nip off a bum loaf" :)

In a similar vein, 'Shake hands with the unemployed/self-employed' (dependent on marital status.)

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 11:37
"touching cloth" is one of my least favourites:gag::gag:

nefertari
04-06-2008, 12:55
I use many of these sayings with tongue in cheek but now I live in Derbyshire and my husband is not british born it is often met with quizzical looks rathar than the humour they deserve :D
Suprised me how many Sheffield sayings arent understood here in Derbyshire and were only just outside of sheffield :confused:

PennyHT
04-06-2008, 13:02
I've lived in Newcastle for years now and have never heard of most of these, especially touching cloth, what on earth does that one mean?

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 13:07
I've lived in Newcastle for years now and have never heard of most of these, especially touching cloth, what on earth does that one mean?

It means really really really needing to go for a poo! Think about it a bit and then hurl.

Tricky
04-06-2008, 13:14
alternatively: when the brown dog is peeking his nose through the fence, when the turtle's head is out, when you need to drop the kids off at the pool, a mole at the counter, a peanut headed eel swimming out of its cave, prairie dogging.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 13:15
alternatively: when the brown dog is peeking his nose through the fence, when the turtle's head is out, when you need to drop the kids off at the pool, a mole at the counter, a peanut headed eel swimming out of its cave, prairie dogging.

I bloody hate you:rant::rant::hihi:

Jessica23
04-06-2008, 13:15
alternatively: when the brown dog is peeking his nose through the fence, when the turtle's head is out, when you need to drop the kids off at the pool, a mole at the counter, a peanut headed eel swimming out of its cave, prairie dogging.

Or, as we say in my house, 'I'm just off for a crap love'.

slickwitch
04-06-2008, 13:16
I love it when my auntie says "Oooh Barry Hell". She sounds absolutely barking.

Miss_60
04-06-2008, 13:58
[QUOTE=slickwitch;3616955]My mum used to use this as an expression of her surprise. Anyone else heard it? [QUOTE]

Yeh, I've heard of it, must be an expression used in Yorkshire as my parents never said it where I come from daaan saaaf (down South)

PennyHT
04-06-2008, 14:07
There are some weird ones up here
Its a Shearer meaning its good