View Full Version : Help required regarding recipe ideas - sensible ones.


best sheff
28-05-2008, 15:31
I have been looking at cooking websites and a few cook books. But everything is well that jazzed-up and complicated that you need a food-degree just to decipher the ingredients and a degree in modern-creation to display the dish.

I am fed-up of reading recipes that contain spices and fruits that I never knew existed. WHAT IíM LOOKING FOR, are just plain meal ideas that are both cheap and easy to make.

You could say meals that Granny used to make, before the posh-uns and the TV Chefs made cooking an impossibility and extremely expensive.

Any website / recipe advice is very welcome.

Thanks,

A very HUNGARY, Best Sheff

Grim Reaper
28-05-2008, 15:34
Look on the recipes section of moneysavingexpert.com. You'll find it under 'Moneysaving Old Style' ;)

lyndix
28-05-2008, 15:35
Are we talking shepherds pie simple?

lyndix
28-05-2008, 15:46
http://www.homepride.co.uk/recipes/
http://www.lovelurpak.co.uk/inSearchOfGoodFood//recipes/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/

Treatment
28-05-2008, 15:47
Chicken Livers stir fry is quite simple and, in my opinion, very tasty. :thumbsup:

newvanandman
28-05-2008, 15:50
Beef Cassarole

Ingredients
Some olive oil
About 500g (a bit more than a pound) of cheap, nasty stewing beef. The sort I used costs about £2 per pound.
A good-sized onion, chopped
A big pinch of mixed herbs, or some specific kind of herbs if you have them in the house.
Half a pint or so of truly awful white wine. I expect the recipe would work fine with adequate wine too, but the stuff I used was verging on the undrinkable.
Half a pint or so of chicken stock. Beef stock would probably be even better if you have it, but I hadn't.
One beef-flavoured stock cube (so sue me)
A good tablespoon of golden syrup
A kilo of potatoes - new, for preference.
A tin of tomatoes
Salt & pepper to taste


Method
Chop the meat into biggish bite-sized chunks
Heat the oil in a big, solid non-stick pot.
When it's really hot, brown the meat aggressively in small batches. By ``aggressively'', I mean that you have to courageously resist the urge to stir it, leaving it to cook one side at a time, thoroughly, so that it develops a slightly burned crust.
Once you've removed the last batch of beef from the pot (keep it on a plate), put the chopped onion in the beef juices, and fry it fairly dry until is just starts to burn. Then add some more oil, and keep frying the onion in it until it softens.
Return the meat to the pan.
Add the herbs, the white wine and the stock. Top up with a bit of water if you don't think you have enough liquid. Better yet, use a bit more wine.
If you truly trust me, you will now crumble a beef stock cube into the mixture. If you're a food snob or a BSE paranoic, you'd probably rather not, and I quite understand; but don't come running to me when the casserole is merely very, very good.
Pour in the golden syrup. Go on, do it. It makes all the difference. Don't worry, the casserole won't end up sickly sweet: the syrup just brings out the natural sweetness of the other ingredients.
Now you're rolling. Give it a good stir, reduce the pot to a very low simmer, cover it with a tight lid, and walk away for two hours. At this point, if - like me - you have no potatoes in the house, you'll want to nip out and find one of those 24-hour greengrocers :-)
Just make sure the liquid doesn't all boil away, otherwise the food will burn.
Two hours later, your beef should be tender, and the juices should be mulching down nicely. Chop the potatoes into big, hearty lumps and throw 'em in.
Now the tomatoes. You want them either chopped finely or mashed through a collender. Don't forget to add all the tomato juice from the tin. Also a bit more wine.
Nearly done. Add your salt and pepper, give it a stir, and wait for the potatoes to cook through - probably about 20-30 minutes, but do test one.
Serve. Just like that: no bread, no rice, no nothing. The whole meal is in one pot.

lyndix
28-05-2008, 15:52
Steak in ale pie:love:
Meat and tata pie:love:
Hotpot:love:
Ash:love::love:

Buttercup80
28-05-2008, 15:54
Basic tomato sauce:

Olive oil
red onion, 1 chopped
Garlic clove, 1 chopped finely or minced
Chilli flakes, whatever you want but start with 1/2 - 1 tsp or so.
Sugocasa - 1 bottle. Alright, you can use normal chopped tomatoes but Sugocasa is a lot nicer and will be worth it. You can get it in Sainsburys with all the other tomatoes, it's just a rougher type of passata
Basil, a handful of leaves
Sugar - 1 tsp
Salt and pepper

Fry the garlic and chilli flakes in the olive oil (don't scrimp on oil) for a minute or two, then add the onion. Fry that fairly gently until it's soft then add the Sugocasa/tomatoes. Add the sugar, salt and pepper and bring to the boil. Leave to cook on a simmer for about 20 minutes / half an hour so it reduces the sauce to nice and thick, it needs to coat the pasta not fall off it into slop at the bottom of dish! Somewhere around the end, add the basil leaves (torn up) and stir in.

You can double, treble the quantity etc and it'll last for up to a week in the fridge. I made a aubergine bake on Sunday (layer fried strips of aubergine, sauce, lots of basil and Taleggio cheese (try Mozzerella if it's easier to find), and parmesan up in a baking dish then bake for 20 minutes. Fabulous stuff.

Monday - used sauce as a pizza base with rest of Taleggio/Mozzerella cheese and pepperoni

Tuesday - Linguine with tomato sauce.

I doubled the quantity above and it's done 3 seperate and lovely meals for 2 people. It's the end of the month so it was cheap, easy to make and very versatile. You can also put it on steak as a sauce.

Hope this helps!

lyndix
28-05-2008, 15:57
Just found this one that looks really tasty
http://www.agalinks.com/RecipeSearch.asp?Recipe=207
Theres loads more on that site as well!

boutiquechoc
28-05-2008, 16:12
Get on Delia Online she does some great dishes, you can print them off and they are easy as hell to make! Also you can print a shopping list off to take shopping!

Space
28-05-2008, 16:52
Get a couple of them Goblin puddings in red tins! Reight nice heh heh

Mathom
28-05-2008, 17:18
Get a couple of them Goblin puddings in red tins! Reight nice heh heh

They're bloody nice, them! Where d'you get them from these days? I used to get 'em in Netto.

Try pork and apple stew:
Fry a pound of diced pork til brown, then tip into big oven dish.
Chuck in a chopped onion, 2 chopped carrots, loads of mushies, and any other bits of veg you fancy.
Add half the usual amount of water to 2 chicken or pork stock cubes, then add a pint of cider. Chuck all over the food in the oven dish, making sure it's just covered.
Cook, uncovered for one hour.
45 minutes in, add quarters of peeled, cored, baking apple, they make lovely apple dumplings on top.
Serve with mash or baked spuds and loads of blue cheese.

ShinyPurple
28-05-2008, 17:29
A very easy & very tasty spaghetti carbonara:


Chop 2 or 3 rashers of drycure bacon into bitesize pieces and fry in butter slowly over a low heat until crispy and leave in the pan.

Cook enough spaghetti for 2 people (or any other pasta you fancy).

Mix a handful of grated parmesan into 3 or 4 egg yolks.

Drain your pasta and return it to the pan.

Tip the yolk/parmesan mix into the pasta and stir - at first it will look awful but keep stirring and it turns into a lovely eggy cheesy sauce.

Stir in the bacon and butter it cooked in.


Yum - now I'm drooling :D

This is a truly great recipe because there are no exact measurements (you can use more bacon, more parmesan & more egg yolks) so it is almost impossible to get wrong :D

Space
28-05-2008, 19:51
They're bloody nice, them! Where d'you get them from these days? I used to get 'em in Netto.

I get em in Morro's! 69p each! Reight nice :thumbsup:

Bago
28-05-2008, 20:26
Basic recipes? I would go for the Delia Smith's cook books. Especially her earlier ones. I think she wrote one that covered all basic methods and recipes.

I also bought a Gordon Ramsey cook book which only had his basic recipes. It was a blue cover, I can't remember the exact name, but something like "Gordon Ramsey Made Simple".

Cheap and easy recipes?

Try something like Shepherd's Pie. Instead of mashing potatoes, you can always just use Smash. Instead of making a proper gravy, you can always use Bisto. Or even just some good stock cubes like Marigold(?)

A roast is also easy to do too. Get a good joint, and just bung this into the oven without much added to it. Same can be done for chickens. All you need is to put some veg and potatoes on. Either boiled. Or boiled, and then roasted, or pan-fried.

There was also an easy recipe on tv the other night. Boiled chicken. Boil a whole chicken with carrots, celeries, swedes, potatoes, and/or rice. You can add some stock cubes, or just leave it as it is. Their recipe had added saffron, but this can be omitted. Any hard vegetables would be good for this kind of recipes because it'll be soft after a hour or so, and the chicken would almost be off the bone when it's done. Simple and easy.

funkymiss
28-05-2008, 20:29
Get on Delia Online she does some great dishes, you can print them off and they are easy as hell to make! Also you can print a shopping list off to take shopping!

Do you think? I think the over complicates things and makes a right fiddle out of everything!

cloudybay
28-05-2008, 20:32
Basic recipes? I would go for the Delia Smith's cook books. Especially her earlier ones. I think she wrote one that covered all basic methods and recipes.

I also bought a Gordon Ramsey cook book which only had his basic recipes. It was a blue cover, I can't remember the exact name, but something like "Gordon Ramsey Made Simple".

Cheap and easy recipes?

Try something like Shepherd's Pie. Instead of mashing potatoes, you can always just use Smash. Instead of making a proper gravy, you can always use Bisto. Or even just some good stock cubes like Marigold(?)

A roast is also easy to do too. Get a good joint, and just bung this into the oven without much added to it. Same can be done for chickens. All you need is to put some veg and potatoes on. Either boiled. Or boiled, and then roasted, or pan-fried.

There was also an easy recipe on tv the other night. Boiled chicken. Boil a whole chicken with carrots, celeries, swedes, potatoes, and/or rice. You can add some stock cubes, or just leave it as it is. Their recipe had added saffron, but this can be omitted. Any hard vegetables would be good for this kind of recipes because it'll be soft after a hour or so, and the chicken would almost be off the bone when it's done. Simple and easy.

The 2008 Nobel prize for the decimation of anything food related goes to Bago :clap::clap::clap:

taxman
28-05-2008, 20:36
This is a truly great recipe because there are no exact measurements (you can use more bacon, more parmesan & more egg yolks) so it is almost impossible to get wrong :D

Which is exactly how cooking should be. I always have trouble explaining recipes to people because my basic unit of measurement is the "some". No two meals are the same and because I've cooked for so long I just cook from instinct.

Dozy
28-05-2008, 20:41
Which is exactly how cooking should be. I always have trouble explaining recipes to people because my basic unit of measurement is the "some". No two meals are the same and because I've cooked for so long I just cook from instinct. My bold

Ooh, is that a new supermarket??? :hihi:

Bago
28-05-2008, 20:48
I'll bung this one in for free too, even though I haven't made it in years. It's a chinese recipe.

"Water Egg"
Ingredients : Egg + Water

Your water has to be more than the egg. (I finally figured this out after years of trying. lol.) Whisk 2-3 eggs, and add water to it, making sure that your water amount is either the same amount as your egg, or more.

Then just put this into a container, over a steamer. A steamer can be a pot full of boiling water, with some kind of raised platform (i.e. upsidedown cup?) It'll be cooked under 10-15 minutes, especially if the water was already boiled.

People add chopped ham, or spring onions as preferred.
End result. (http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y152/boo_licious/misc2/steamedeggcontainer.jpg)
With sprinkled extra ingredient on top when serving. (http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/1164708920/gallery_12248_3943_45835.jpg)

(Oh, you can also use this as a dessert recipe if you just add some sugar, and some cocoa powder, or ground coffee powder. You can also substitute milk with water if you want this to be a dessert. If a cheat creme brulee, just sprinkle sugar on top and use a burner to burn some crispy sugar. Voi-la. )

Some recipes are very hardy, and they will still work if you get it wrong. A lot of the home-made recipes are like this. I don't cook measuring anything when at home. They either turn out right, or they don't. :hihi: I normally taste as I go.

Some professional recipes need to be reduced and tested before they are written in books. Even some of the recipes by the celebrity chefs are not done by them, but are written under their name, and is not something that they have tested in a typical domestic kitchen. So I wouldn't follow those ones. Just be more weary of who is a more credible chef, and have more credible books.

That's why the Delia Smith's books are more tested and hardy. Preferably her earlier work, cos she's gone ga-ga these days with her recipes!