View Full Version : Dog misbehavin


Annoni_mouse
20-11-2007, 07:41
Hi all.

We collected Frank 2(!) on Saturday, and im very pleased to report that he's a bundle of energy who's settling into life at home just fine.

He's obviously never had any experience of walking on the lead, but im patiantly 'bringin him up to speed' on the etiquette:D

The only problem we have with him is when he has a chew stick or a chewy toy. He guards them closely, growling at anyone who goes near him, although so far he's never gone any further than growling (touch wood).

As there is an eight year old in the house, my priority has to be her welfare, and I dont want to put her in harms way, so I was wondering if anyone had any tips on how to curb this aggresive behaviour, other than remove the situations where he has the chewy around us?

I'd just like to stress that he is a real softy when he hasnt got a chewy, but with one, he becomes very protective of it.

Thanks in advance:)

Lotti
20-11-2007, 16:43
Hi Annoni mouse and congratulations!!

I can completely understand (and agree with) your concern. Dogs are powerful creatures no matter what size they are and this is quite a common behaviour.

Dogs have evolved through guarding their food - it's a case of natural selection, so now more and more breeders are trying to selectively 'breed out' this nature. It could be part of his personality, or his history but either way it's very treatable.

You need to teach Frank that it's really good to have stuff taken off him, starting by swapping the chew toy for something of higher value.

First sit and work out what it is Frank really loves, and rank them. Use his #1 favourite thing to begin with to swap with his chew toy, then his #2 etc until you can swap something relatively low value for it.
Then when he's really improving and is swapping with very little effort, start adding the cue (such as 'give') as you swap.

When you feel he can cope with it, begin the exercise by having his #1 favourite to hand (but not ready for a swap), and saying 'give' and take the chew toy - rewarding instantly by giving his #1 favourite reward. Now he's learning he has to give his part up first.

You can also reward instantly with the chew toy you've just taken from him - if he doesn't want what you've got to offer, it won't work. You have to give him what he wants so if he wants that chew toy more than the object of seemingly higher value - give him the chew toy back as soon as you've taken it.

(ie. take the chew, GOOD BOY! give the chew back and leave him to it)

Sorry this is really vague and brief, I'm in the middle of 101 things so will come back and try to make it more understandable later :lol:

Annoni_mouse
21-11-2007, 07:29
Hi Annoni mouse and congratulations!!

I can completely understand (and agree with) your concern. Dogs are powerful creatures no matter what size they are and this is quite a common behaviour.

Dogs have evolved through guarding their food - it's a case of natural selection, so now more and more breeders are trying to selectively 'breed out' this nature. It could be part of his personality, or his history but either way it's very treatable.

You need to teach Frank that it's really good to have stuff taken off him, starting by swapping the chew toy for something of higher value.

First sit and work out what it is Frank really loves, and rank them. Use his #1 favourite thing to begin with to swap with his chew toy, then his #2 etc until you can swap something relatively low value for it.
Then when he's really improving and is swapping with very little effort, start adding the cue (such as 'give') as you swap.

When you feel he can cope with it, begin the exercise by having his #1 favourite to hand (but not ready for a swap), and saying 'give' and take the chew toy - rewarding instantly by giving his #1 favourite reward. Now he's learning he has to give his part up first.

You can also reward instantly with the chew toy you've just taken from him - if he doesn't want what you've got to offer, it won't work. You have to give him what he wants so if he wants that chew toy more than the object of seemingly higher value - give him the chew toy back as soon as you've taken it.

(ie. take the chew, GOOD BOY! give the chew back and leave him to it)

Sorry this is really vague and brief, I'm in the middle of 101 things so will come back and try to make it more understandable later :lol:

Not at all, I completely understood your post:)

As a matter of fact, we did try something similar with him last night, offering a few chunks of dry food in return for a piece of velcro(dont ask!) that he decided he wanted to play with. That seemed to work pretty well.

We've also limited the number of chewy toys he has to one at a time, as before we ere finding his pig ears littered around the house:hihi::hihi:

Adz
21-11-2007, 10:07
Good advice from Lottie and exactly what i would say. Also you have done right by limiting the number of chews all over the place. In the end it will become fun and he may even look to you to do this as he knows something more exciting may be coming.

beckelina
21-11-2007, 10:26
I agree with above posts and would also say do persevere with this process however long it takes...you need to have confidence in having control over your dog, and your dog needs to trust and respect you too.
I can remove anything from my dogs (dinner, bone, toy...) at any time and they don't bat an eyelid and that gives me a lot of confidence and trust in them too.
However, the cat was a different matter!