View Full Version : Sheffield Blitz


sarahjo
28-02-2007, 16:56
I am doing my dissertation on the Sheffield Blitz and the impact of this on the working class. I'm wanting to look at all aspects of life from the impact on jobs to living conditions to social life so if anyone that was there could help me I would really appreciate it.

thankyou
sarah

flyer
01-03-2007, 17:59
Iwas told on one of the days? water was completly shut off to the Penistone rd Langsett area,but one house on High house rd had a thin trickle of water still coming (down hill?) the word soon spread and for a couple of days a endless line going though this kitchen with pot& pans waiting for their turn to fill.

Albatross
01-03-2007, 19:39
There's a video documentary available called 'Sheffield At War - The Blitz' which costs about a tenner, or maybe you can get it from the library.
Also if you go to the following link http://www.bbc.co.uk/home/d/ and search for Sheffield blitz it comes up with over 40 pages of peoples stories about it.

Here's what wilkipedia had to say.
The Sheffield Blitz is the name given to the worst nights of bombing in Sheffield, England during the Second World War. It took place over the nights of 12 December and 15 December 1940. Over 660 lives were lost, 1500 more were injured and 40,000 were made homeless. 3,000 homes were demolished with a further 3,000 badly damaged. A total 78,000 homes received damage. Sheffield was targeted by the Luftwaffe due to its importance as a steel centre.

langy
02-03-2007, 04:18
I used to live on Addison Rd in Firth Park and the house had a crack running from the gutters down to the top of the side door as a result of an incendry bomb landing at the top of Addison Rd during an air raid. Some of the houses had air raid shelters in the back gardens but some people just used the kitchen pantry under the stars.

Cynthia
02-03-2007, 04:48
[QUOTE
The Sheffield Blitz is the name given to the worst nights of bombing in Sheffield, England during the Second World War. It took place over the nights of 12 December and 15 December 1940. Over 660 lives were lost, 1500 more were injured and 40,000 were made homeless. 3,000 homes were demolished with a further 3,000 badly damaged. A total 78,000 homes received damage. Sheffield was targeted by the Luftwaffe due to its importance as a steel centre.[/QUOTE]

Albatross
02-03-2007, 05:42
[QUOTE

The Sheffiedl blitz was on Thursday the 10th. December and Sunday 13th. December 1940.

Cynthia. Canada.

If you check your calendar Cynthia you would see that the 10th. December 1940 was on a Tuesday and 13th. December1940 was on a Friday. If you also check the BBC link I put on the post it says on there that the first Sheffield Blitz started on December 12th night and went through to the 13th so there can't have been a Sheffield Blitz on the 10th.

PopT
02-03-2007, 07:17
sarahjo

If you search the forum you will find more information on a previous posting.

It's entitled 'Sheffield Blitz Information' posted by 'Kenny' on the 19/11/2005.

I hope this helps you.

Happy Days!

TheRedWizard
02-03-2007, 14:02
Check out trades and labour council minutes at Shoreham St., and of course the papers at the library.

Very interesting dissertation. What themes are you focussing on?

sammyc
21-04-2008, 02:09
The blitz was definately on the 12th. It was the night of my mums 18th birthday she was on the way back from the pictures when the siren went and spent the rest of the night in a shelter with complete strangers.


[QUOTE
The Sheffield Blitz is the name given to the worst nights of bombing in Sheffield, England during the Second World War. It took place over the nights of 12 December and 15 December 1940. Over 660 lives were lost, 1500 more were injured and 40,000 were made homeless. 3,000 homes were demolished with a further 3,000 badly damaged. A total 78,000 homes received damage. Sheffield was targeted by the Luftwaffe due to its importance as a steel centre.

The Sheffiedl blitz was on Thursday the 10th. December and Sunday 13th. December 1940.

Cynthia. Canada.[/QUOTE]

Womerry2
21-04-2008, 19:01
In a house on Westbrook Bank, you can still see pencil writing and drawings on the cellar wall where a family took shelter. Another house in the area was hit on the same night.

Oswald
21-04-2008, 19:29
I am starting out on a dissertation regarding the archaeology of second world war Sheffield and South Yorkshire. I would definately be interested in what your findings are on this subject.

With regards to writing on the cellar wall, that is gold dust from an archaeological point of view. Do you know any more about it?
Cheers

JuJu2
21-04-2008, 20:59
Hi,

Try www.chrishobbs.com

Best of luck

Basalt
21-04-2008, 22:53
You should read the script of It's a Bit Lively Outside by Joyce Holliday. Saw this at the Crucible many years ago, a stunning piece of theatre and very poinantly tells the story of the Sheffield blitz through the eyes of the people in Sheffield at the time.

Womerry2
22-04-2008, 07:32
With regards to writing on the cellar wall, that is gold dust from an archaeological point of view. Do you know any more about it?
Cheers


The people who wrote on the cellar walls visited their old home about six years ago when our friends lived there. It's now a student house. I can't remember the number at the moment, but I'll get back to you :)

cat631
22-04-2008, 09:53
Hello Oswald. Not too far from The Fox House Pub can be found the remains of one of the decoy sites. These sites on the outskirts of major cities I think were code named Starfish, and contained incendiary devices to produce plenty of fire and smoke. The idea being to divert enemy bombers from their intended target. If this is of any interest and you are not familiar with the area, please contact me. I will tell you how to find the place or take you there.

jmdee
22-04-2008, 17:18
[According to Mary Walton in her book 'Raiders Over Sheffield', the first attack was at a few minutes after 7 pm on December 12 1940. This went on for about 9 hours. The second major raid was Sunday the 15th, starting at 6.50 pm. This raid was shorter, and concentrated more on the industrial side of the city.


QUOTE=sammyc;3419877]The blitz was definately on the 12th. It was the night of my mums 18th birthday she was on the way back from the pictures when the siren went and spent the rest of the night in a shelter with complete strangers.




The Sheffiedl blitz was on Thursday the 10th. December and Sunday 13th. December 1940.

Cynthia. Canada.[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]

algy
23-04-2008, 09:19
If you're looking for info on the effect on people and daily life the Mary Walton book is definitely worth reading. Mary was the chief reference librarian, and the co-author was the City librarian. In the war the Central library was a clearing house for information for bombed out residents, and people trying to contact relatives.

London
23-04-2008, 10:26
Please see calender below for
December 1940
S M Tu W Th F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

The 1st Blitz was carried out from early evening Dec 12 to circa 04.00 Dec 13, and covering south Sheffield from Millhouses, roughly following the railway line, to the vicinity of the Wicker Arches. Many shops n the Moor (which was then the main road from London/Ecclesall Roads to Pinstone Street) were reduced to rubble including Robert Bros, as was John Walsh down Fargate. Much of the Moor remained a derilict bomb site, and an eyesore for many years after the war

The 2nd blitz was carried out from early evening Dec 15 to circa 03.00 Dec 16, and starting from the vicinity of the Wicker Arches and proceeding roughly northwards. they missed the major steelworks

London
23-04-2008, 11:25
[QUOTE=London;3431147]Please see calender below for
December 1940
Su M Tu W Th Fr Sa
01 02 03 04 05 06 07
08 09 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

Another APOLOGY - CORRECTION TO DECEMBER 1940 CALENDER!

Having corrected the auto LH shift of the numerics by inserting appropriate 0's, it now transpires that the alphabetics are subject also to the Auto LH shift. If this correction doesn't work those who are interested (if any) can RH shift the Apha's as appropriate.

cat631
23-04-2008, 15:27
A list of air raids on Sheffield and the casualties; taken from Sheffield at War 1939-45.
http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o130/cat631/DSCN5287.jpg

johnpm
24-04-2008, 15:37
My wife's uncle Arthur Moore was killed whilst a driver in the Auxiliary Fire Service during the Blitz firefighting on Burgess Street, Sheffield on 13th December 1940.
I think he was the only fireman to be killed.

Pegasus
24-04-2008, 16:54
It would be interesting to find out from older forumers or those with elderly relations, who would be in their mid to late 70s onwards, what it was like and the conditions people survived in.

For instance my mother who is 75 and lived in Pitsmoor says that her school was bombed and she had to go to the Catholic school where they were bullied and beaten by the nuns because they were C of E (I'm not having a go at any religious group here).

Some houses had Anderson Shelters and others had reinforced cellars.

She says that they had to sit out the early raids under the cellar stairs for almost a year because the cellars had to be knocked through for escape purposes and reinforced which took ages.

She recalls how her two sisters, my aunts (now long gone) escaped from a bombed public shelter in the Wicker, my Grandfather was at his whits end, going out in the midst of an air raid to look for them and risking arrest because he should have been fire watching with another bloke on their street.

I believe fire watchers had the great job of knocking incendiaries off roofs and covering them with dirt as these were made from phosphorus which burns when exposed to air as well as dealing with any other small fires caused by shrapnel.

Before my Grandmother died she was genuinely terrified of fireworks and hated Bonfire Night.

cat631
24-04-2008, 17:44
A piece of spare ground near where I lived as a kid was always referred to as 'the tank'. My friend's Dad later explained the name to me. Most pieces of spare ground in the war had a big hole dug in them and filled with water as an emergency supply. He remembered attempting to extinguish incendiaries with sand, buckets of water from the tank and a styrrup pump.
The council or corporation as it was known then, supplied rescue ladders, one set of ladders would serve something like twenty/thirty houses. Ladders that survived the war went on to help paint and repair these properties for many years after.

cartav
24-04-2008, 20:05
I am starting out on a dissertation regarding the archaeology of second world war Sheffield and South Yorkshire. I would definately be interested in what your findings are on this subject.

With regards to writing on the cellar wall, that is gold dust from an archaeological point of view. Do you know any more about it?
Cheers

------------------------------------
This might be a false trail for you now, but when alterations were being carried out on Somme Barracks in the mid-1970s, removal of earlier panels of dry lining revealed graffitti scratched on the exposed painted wall by occupants in WW2, when the barracks were used as a holding centre for military personnel who had been picked up in Sheffield after going AWOL. There just might be some record or photographs of what was found, but don't hold your breath. From memory, the wall in question was a structural component which divided ground floor areas fronting on to West Street.

You might also be interested to know that two bomb craters are still visible in a fairway at Lees Hall Golf course. Telling here which fairway might generate more trespassing than there is already, but I'm sure a genuine enquiry to the Club would allow you to gain access for inspection.

Cynthia
25-04-2008, 04:05
Sarajo.
I have brought forward the thread- 'Sheffield blitz information' as the answers may be of interest to you.

Cynthia. Canada.

cartav
25-04-2008, 18:58
Ref.private message response to my #624 from Ralph.

Regret recent mild heart condition prevents me driving for a month, & accessing area of concern. Have some pics of sparse remains of Starfish control post foundations etc. on Houndkirk moor if these are of interest, & some of houses which were built after originals were destroyed by a bomb. Need your e.mail detail to send these.

If you've not seen it already, you could look on the outside of the City Hall and in particular, on the stone columns to the entrance portico. Inserts on the face of these & on some of the steps are repairs to the structure which was damaged by nearby bombs on the night of the Blitz. More likely this surface marking was from masonry from bombed buildings rather than bomb splinters.

galena
26-04-2008, 08:49
The original book 'Sheffield at War' was published in 1948 by the Sheffield Telegraph and Star and publication was only 'delayed' due to the paper shortage. Not only does it contain a map of where the bombs fell there are also references to wartime efforts and involvment not found in any later publications. The paper also produced facimiles of the issues of the time 25 years later. Perhaps the library or the offices of the Telegraph have copies of these. Many of the results from 'googling' come from these publications.

My grandfather was the Inspector for Sheffield Transport on duty in Fitzalan Square when Marples collapsed and my mother was on duty as a VAD. Like one of your other contributors has said, at the end of her life she suffered from dementia which took the form of 'seeing' the images of that disaster. She continually repeated ' we musn't go in there, there are only bodies behind the wall, there is nothing we can do', she also saw 'doodlebugs flying over' and she would save things 'in case' as if rationing was still operating; all this over sixty later, this impact was so etched on her mind.

howden25
27-06-2008, 13:45
As I was only 7 at the time my memory is not too good.

It would be the 2nd raid that went from the Wicker to the North at Brightside, a land mine landed in the vacinity of Brightside Railway Station, damaging the platform buildings, the Booking Office was re built on the over bridge.

The blast destroyed houses and shops from Limpsfield Rd to Dearne St. (Station Hotel), also going up the roads and through the houses to the back yards, removing windows, slates and ceilings, when we came out of the Anderson Shelters in the early morning all you could hear was the crunch under foot of glas and slate, the suprising thing was that we had left the middle door shut with budgie and cage behind it, door of its hinges, bird ok.

There was a time when we thought all had ended, a flash we saw through the shelter door and a bang, a gasometer on Holywell Rd had blown up, inciendry hit it and one was burning ontop of the next one, some man went up and kicked it off.

My mother was at Millhouses on the first raid (tram conductress) and had to walk back through Sheffield as best she could, taking shelter in door ways trams and buildings burning, she said that at one time she saw a head role past!! we were surprised when she got home, thought that she would have stayed where she was.

School was at the Doctors house and soup vans at the bottom of the road.

If anyone disputes facts, blame it on age.

Texas
27-06-2008, 17:56
I can remember distinctly on the morning after the first nights bombing. There wasn't any water and we were waiting at the bottom end of Fox Street for a water tanker to arrive. All the residents were milling around with buckets and bowls and I remember looking up Fox Street and seeing, what seemed,the entire surface of the street covered in smashed roofing slates.
Nowadays some people use broken slate as a decorative feature in their gardens, when I see this, it takes me straight back to that morning after the blitz. I was seven at the time, funny how the mind works.

soft ayperth
27-06-2008, 20:18
Please see calender below for
December 1940
S M Tu W Th F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

The 1st Blitz was carried out from early evening Dec 12 to circa 04.00 Dec 13, and covering south Sheffield from Millhouses, roughly following the railway line, to the vicinity of the Wicker Arches. Many shops n the Moor (which was then the main road from London/Ecclesall Roads to Pinstone Street) were reduced to rubble including Robert Bros, as was John Walsh down Fargate. Much of the Moor remained a derilict bomb site, and an eyesore for many years after the war

The 2nd blitz was carried out from early evening Dec 15 to circa 03.00 Dec 16, and starting from the vicinity of the Wicker Arches and proceeding roughly northwards. they missed the major steelworks

I grew up just after the war. I'm sure my parents told me that the reason why the steelworks were spared was because the shops downtown left their lights on to take the hit rather than the more valuable steel industry. Is there any truth at all to this and if not, how did the steelworks escape being hit, while the Moor became "a derelict bomb site?"

biker
27-06-2008, 22:28
I grew up just after the war. I'm sure my parents told me that the reason why the steelworks were spared was because the shops downtown left their lights on to take the hit rather than the more valuable steel industry. Is there any truth at all to this and if not, how did the steelworks escape being hit, while the Moor became "a derelict bomb site?"

I believe that the Germans bombed using a radio beam and we discovered how to bend it slightly,making them bomb in the wrong place

Plain Talker
27-06-2008, 23:22
I grew up just after the war. I'm sure my parents told me that the reason why the steelworks were spared was because the shops downtown left their lights on to take the hit rather than the more valuable steel industry. Is there any truth at all to this and if not, how did the steelworks escape being hit, while the Moor became "a derelict bomb site?"

The shops would not/ should not have had their lights visible, because of the blackout.

There were quite hefty punishments for leaving a light visible. Air raid wardens would patrol their neighbourhoods, to make sure that no property let even the smallest chink of light be visible from their properties, domestic or commercial.

Someone (I forget who) put forward a theory that the bombers mistook one of the roads for the river, and followed that instead.

Plain Talker
27-06-2008, 23:29
I believe that the Germans bombed using a radio beam and we discovered how to bend it slightly,making them bomb in the wrong place

I'd heard that legend, too,

I can just imagine the scene, in the enemy aircraft, flying over the UK.

"Fritz, fritz, Look! There's the armaments factory, directly below us. Let the bombs go, now!"

"No, no Wilhelm, the computer says 'No!' - The factory is not the big industrial buliding beneath us, it's that mountain over there!"

howden25
28-06-2008, 08:38
There is one thing, there was a Barrage Balloon stationed on Wicobank Hill, top of Jenkin Rd, the nearest works were at Meadow Hall Rd about 1/2 mile away and they were Engineering, the main ones were between Carlisle St. and Attercliffe Common, the foundries and rolling mills.

Could this have been done to decieve? and the River Don was not that far away

Tooeg
28-06-2008, 11:55
I was always told that the wet road was mistaken for the river, although it was never clear which road and which river. whatever the reason for the mistake, it would only have needed the first few bombs to be in the wrong place, and all the others would follow.
I recall in the 50s all the bottom of the moor being single story buidings and lots of bomb sites.

soft ayperth
28-06-2008, 11:57
Maybe what I heard was speculation, public gossip. I asked the question because I'm aware that in Coventry, which took a massive hit from the blitz, Churchill knew ahead of time that it was going to happen because the Allies (principally via the Canadian Stephenson) had broken the code used by the Germans in their radio messages. He, Churchill, reasoned that it was better to let Coventry take the hit rather than reveal that the code had been broken. So, sometimes, a strategic decision was made to let one area suffer in the interests of the whole. I take the point, however, that what happened in Sheffield may have been a combination of deception devices and good luck. Has anyone published anything definitive on this?

buck
28-06-2008, 15:11
If you check your calendar Cynthia you would see that the 10th. December 1940 was on a Tuesday and 13th. December1940 was on a Friday. If you also check the BBC link I put on the post it says on there that the first Sheffield Blitz started on December 12th night and went through to the 13th so there can't have been a Sheffield Blitz on the 10th.I was there at the time and was bombed out on the second attack, trapped in the house for a time. The first attack started around 7PM on thursday 12th December with the all clear sounding around dawn. Most damage occured in the City Centre especially around Fitzalan Sqare, Pinstone Street, and the Moor. Fargate and the Cathedral area were undamaged. Most of Sunday the 15th damage was around the steel works at Tinsley, as well as Darnall. Once again the attack started at around 7 PM, and continued till nearly dawn.

buck
28-06-2008, 15:23
I grew up just after the war. I'm sure my parents told me that the reason why the steelworks were spared was because the shops downtown left their lights on to take the hit rather than the more valuable steel industry. Is there any truth at all to this and if not, how did the steelworks escape being hit, while the Moor became "a derelict bomb site?"There was a theory that the germans homed in on the flashes coming from the tram wires as the trams moved around the city. A line of parked tramswere his at the bottom of the high streetnand set afire. The flames ignited Walsh's store ,and the germans sent doen more bombs there which causd the terrible loss of life at the Marples.

buck
28-06-2008, 15:31
It would be interesting to find out from older forumers or those with elderly relations, who would be in their mid to late 70s onwards, what it was like and the conditions people survived in.

For instance my mother who is 75 and lived in Pitsmoor says that her school was bombed and she had to go to the Catholic school where they were bullied and beaten by the nuns because they were C of E (I'm not having a go at any religious group here).

Some houses had Anderson Shelters and others had reinforced cellars.

She says that they had to sit out the early raids under the cellar stairs for almost a year because the cellars had to be knocked through for escape purposes and reinforced which took ages.

She recalls how her two sisters, my aunts (now long gone) escaped from a bombed public shelter in the Wicker, my Grandfather was at his whits end, going out in the midst of an air raid to look for them and risking arrest because he should have been fire watching with another bloke on their street.

I believe fire watchers had the great job of knocking incendiaries off roofs and covering them with dirt as these were made from phosphorus which burns when exposed to air as well as dealing with any other small fires caused by shrapnel.

Before my Grandmother died she was genuinely terrified of fireworks and hated Bonfire Night.My Aunt Nellie had an Anderson shelter in her backyard in Darnall, which she made comfortable by having double bunk beds and carpets. Next door also had one but had struck a water line while digging ,and it flooded. On the Sunday night both families went into Nellies shelter just in time for a bomb to hit so close that the edge of the crater was two feet fom the shelter entrance. The blast took the unused Anderson out of the ground and threw it over a wall. Everyone survived with damaged hearing, except for the Grandpa from next door who had gone into their house for a cup of tea. He was killed and they used the back door of his house as a stetdher.

Tooeg
28-06-2008, 15:32
All over the city there used to be evidence of bombing where 2 or 3 houses are missing from a terrace. These were kids playgrounds which they would call "bomb sites". most have, over the years been infilled. Now I've said that I can't think of an example.
Although if you drive up Crookes road from broomhill, there is a small break in the terrace on the right. both remaining gable ends were for many years 4 inch single brick dividing walls. They were finally repaired properly 15 or 20 years ago I guess. Often there has been a buttress built, or the Chimney stack reinforced to help support the remaining property.

Cynthia
29-06-2008, 04:36
As my mistake with the dates of the Sheffield blitz seem to be of vital interest on this subject, I would like to inform you that I was in an unfinished air raid shelter that was bordered by Heather Rd. Foxglove Rd.Windmill Lane & Wincobank Ave. First incendiary bombs were dropped down Heather Rd and then the land mine exploded at the corner of Heather Rd and Foxglove Rd. Killing Mrs. Booth and injuring several people and damaging lots of houses including ours. I have posted before about having to live down the basement of St. Hilda's Church as we had no roof or windows. About one house having water and queueing outside their kitchen window with whatever we had to hold water. About the second land mine that dropped on the Sunday night on the allotments. I have lots of memories about being a child during a war, it was not funny, why I made the mistake about the dates I do not know, like lots of other people I will say it was a "Senior moment".
By the way I always understood that with the steel works being in the valley and a thick mist hanging over the valley the Germans missed the works and bombed the houses. I do not know if this theory is true.
Cynthia, Canada.

teeny
29-06-2008, 08:49
My adopted parents lives in the beauchief area during the blitz my mum told me one of the reasons the germans could see us was i was a full moon, my dad was on leave at the time and they spent the night in the woods with friends by beaucheif golf course, The germans dropped bombs in the woods by the railway too , you can still see some damge in the woods now. During the war My dad and his brothers bred rabbits for food and exchanged them for veg and extra goodies , during the war my mum hadhad TB of the stomack and wasn't able to work as a land girl like the rest of her family.

soft ayperth
29-06-2008, 12:28
All over the city there used to be evidence of bombing where 2 or 3 houses are missing from a terrace. These were kids playgrounds which they would call "bomb sites". most have, over the years been infilled. Now I've said that I can't think of an example.
Although if you drive up Crookes road from broomhill, there is a small break in the terrace on the right. both remaining gable ends were for many years 4 inch single brick dividing walls. They were finally repaired properly 15 or 20 years ago I guess. Often there has been a buttress built, or the Chimney stack reinforced to help support the remaining property.

Bottom of Duke St below the Embassy Court Flats where my aunt and uncle lived there was a large piece of ground strewn with building rubble that stayed like that well into the '60s. Had to have been a bomb site. Below it were a terraced row of shops, newsagent, f & c shop, etc., with Gunstone's bakery on opposite side of road. My aunt operated the f & c shop on Broad St and her large glass store windows were blown out the night of the blitz.

flyer
29-06-2008, 14:28
my brother and I had ran away from Fullwood Home's on one of the Blitz nights we was on wood st when it was all in flames, the fireman told us to on home and sharp, well all we was looking for was something to eat(or dare i say it steal) he would be 8 &me 9:o:o:o

hazel
29-06-2008, 15:07
My Dad said that the Germans were to take the wicker arches as their start and follow the river running by the side of the steel works and drop their bombs
He said they mistook the shine of the tram lines for water and went the wrong way from the arches and bombed town and the moor. mmissing all the steel works.
hazel

anita morris
29-06-2008, 16:59
I noticed that there had been bombs around the Jenkin Road area of Brightside, does anyone have any idea if an air raid post was hit there. My mother always told a story about it and I would love to know if it was true. Thanks Anita

Tooeg
29-06-2008, 17:53
My Dad said that the Germans were to take the wicker arches as their start and follow the river running by the side of the steel works and drop their bombs
He said they mistook the shine of the tram lines for water and went the wrong way from the arches and bombed town and the moor. mmissing all the steel works.
hazel

Which way would the bombers have come, crossing the coast in the south east, Kent or Essex. Or further north Grimsby or Cleethorpes. coming in from the east coast, the wicker arches would be too late.
It would be easier now follow the M1, turn left (or right) at the cooling towers.

Bayern Blade
29-06-2008, 21:24
Which way would the bombers have come, crossing the coast in the south east, Kent or Essex. Or further north Grimsby or Cleethorpes. coming in from the east coast, the wicker arches would be too late.


Raiding Sheffield the Luftwaffe came in over the east coast.
Raids coming in from the south would have been out of the question.
Due to the distance and the time spent over enemy territory.

Nigel Womersle
30-06-2008, 00:25
My late Uncle worked for Montague Burton Ltd (tailors) at the time of the Sheffield Blitz. He was their youngest manager - not yet old enough to be called up for war service. He managed the branch at the top of Angel Street, which is now occupied by Primark. In the 1960's Burton's rebuilt the site and opened their ladies branch of the company, Peter Robinson. He would tell us how he and other city centre workers had been issued with passes to get into the centre, should it be necessary to close it to the public. On the Monday morning after the Sunday night attack, a friend took him to work on his motorbike. It must have looked strange as both the friend's legs were in plaster casts. When they approached Wicker, they were stopped by the police at the arches and asked to produce a pass, which of course my uncle did. They were allowed through after being warned of the carnage awaiting them. The police never commented on the plaster casts on the legs. My uncle said it was an horrendous sight - bodies in the street, shop windows blown out, shops reduced to rubble and vehicles blown to bits, and on their sides. Broken water mains were cascading like fountains. When he reached Burton's it was a burnt out wreck, and as some members will remember, stayed that way until the early sixties when Burtons rebuilt the site. Evidently city planners had wanted Burton's to rebuild using the burnt out shell and they refused. Finally the site was completely cleared and a new building erected.

Nigel Womersle
30-06-2008, 00:31
My Grandfather said he stood on the Lincolnshire coast and watched the 'Buzz Bombs' come in from the Channel. He said they had been launched from the french coast. This was some time after the blitz.

Texas
30-06-2008, 18:06
Coincidentely Tooeg and Bayern Blade, I was discussing the subject of the direction of the German air-raids on Sheffield with a pal of mine just today. It started with the raids on Southampton. It seems to be accepted that the bombers approached above cloud level but following the line of the River Test and Itchen, showing as depressions in the cloud layer. Their main target(which they never got), was the Spitfire works on the east side of the Itchen.
I think they used something similar with the raids on Sheffield, using the Humber as a guide and perhaps coordinates after to fly SW.
Big rivers always have an influence on weather patterns in variable degrees.

Expat in US
12-07-2008, 10:17
Dad was a coal miner in Robin Hood country, Mum worked in a bomb factory. They were just a few days from their wedding day, December 17, 1940, when Sheffield was first bombed. The ominous, dreadful sound of heavy engines began to fill the air as they rushed into the family Anderson shelter, built by Granddad and Dad. As the nerve-wracking, throbbing droning went on and on and on, Dad risked a look outside. He pulled open the shelter door and saw a sky "black with planes." Aunt Muriel carried on knitting the jumper she was making for her soldier fiance, Grandma put her knitting down and joined the others just outside the door.

'They're after Sheffi'ld," Granddad said grimly.

"Aye," replied Dad, "Look, there's a glow over there."

He pointed to a spot on the horizon where a faint orange glow was spreading and brightening. The family watched in silent horror (except for an occasional, "Bloody 'ell!") as the northwest horizon was engulfed by angry flames.

It must have seemed like the end of the world as the sky burned just 25 miles away. But Sheffield's Blitz was not the only horror - imagine the feelings later in the war when Dad ran to the scene of a US plane crash only to find the young pilot dead. He retained his soft spot of gratitude for Americans until he died a few years ago. After my brother was born in 1942, Dad, who always loved animals and was an honorable man, very reluctantly found himself poaching rabbits on the Duke of Norfolk's estate to provide enough protein for his family. Cabbages from nearby fields eked out the menu as foodstuffs became ever more scarce.

Not surprisingly, experiences from the war years, following on the heels of the Depression, greatly affected most of those who lived through the deprivations, losses, fears and grief. Mum never threw anything away (to the point where the sitting room ceiling collapsed from the weight of stuff in the attic). A full pantry was essential to keep insecurity at bay and there was always some cash hidden somewhere.

After being involved in the miner's union, Dad was offered a job as manager of the Workingmen's Club, Retford Road, in Woodhouse Mill. Two years after that, Tennent's offered him a job as manager of the Prince of Wales (now known as the Frog & Parrot) on Division Street in Sheffield. As a small girl I often played on the bomb site next to Bramah's factory, fascinated by the sparkling surface on sunny days, a result of all the window glass pulverized by the blitz about ten years before. Across Division Street from the bomb site were brightly colored hoardings, their gaiety hiding the sad, blackened facade of a row of Victorian stone terrace houses, empty shells rendered lifeless by an incendiary bomb - but a wonderful place to play.

A little further down Division Street was a large and magnificent fire station with flats, whose gleaming brass poles accessed from each floor were a source of awe and great temptation. Across the street was an enormous bomb crater - how lucky for the city that the fire station was spared!

I clearly remember the Marples Hotel bomb site and the Burton's too. Part of the back of City Hall was unusable because of bomb damage, as was part of the art gallery in Weston Park. I thought that the iron nubs on low walls were put there on purpose to stop children from sitting on the walls! It was much later in life that I discovered they were all that remained of iron railings, removed to make armaments.

Experience of the war years carried over to most children, I should think. For instance, I now live in a hurricane-prone area and have helped with relief work after a couple of disasters. Thus, we have "the bunker" (a very strong steel wind shelter bolted to the concrete slab in the garage), stocked with ample emergency food, supplies (including a camping toilet) and water - and copious quantities of food, litter and roomy cages for the cats. WWII rationing lasted until 1957 and I don't intend to go short again, if I can help it!

By the way, according to a 1940 ephemeris, the moon was full on the night of December 14th, 7.38 PM, GMT.

howden25
12-07-2008, 14:16
To my vague knowledge, the only bomb was a mine dropped to the south end of Brightside Station, the lines weren't damaged but the property around was.

As far as I can remember no bombs around Jenkin Rd, unless some knows different.

Plain Talker
12-07-2008, 14:43
<snipped for space>

Welcome, expat, what a great story, and vivid memory you shared with us! Thank you.

Floridablade
12-07-2008, 22:41
Excellent post expat, you got me in the throat with that story and so well written. I was just a lad of 11 years on that fateful Thursday night and went to the pictures in Heeley by the railway bridge. I was with my older brother, it was a Mickey Rooney film and I can remember it as though it was yesterday just as Mickey was climbing over the coal in the trains bunker to attack some baddy the sign went up, " The sirens have just sounded etc." being boys we didn't want to look squeamish in front of the girls so there we sat. The film over we made our way to the foyer and there dozens of people crying and obviously in distress, we got two steps outside when we heard the scream of a bomb and without a thought ran towards a lorry parked nearby. Geoff my brother dived under and cracked his head on a steel beam knocking himself out then i felt myself being lifted like a sack of spuds and dumped into the air raid shelter under the railway arches. When I recovered I told the policeman about my brother and he went out again and brought him in. Policemen kept coming and going looking as though they had seen a ghost dishevelled and very distraught. At around 6 one of them said the all clear has gone can you make your way home realising that some of us didn't have one anymore. We lived on Millmount Rd. and during our walk up Chesterfield road there was a big crater in the road and lots of people trying to get water out of a burst pipe with that dazed look on their faces which only extreme stress brings. Our Mother met us about half way home and I'll never forget that look of joy on her face when she saw us unharmed.

Floridablade
12-07-2008, 22:51
I too live in a hurricane prone state and I've experienced three. the last one was Wilma which destroyed our home in Broward but we were safely tucked away in a friends house further inland. I now have plenty of food and water a generator, gas cooker and no end of other stuff just in case. The Hurricane itself isn't the problem it's the lack of food and water afterwards that is the problem.

cat631
13-07-2008, 00:29
This forum gets better and better, two great stories. Thanks.

Expat in US
13-07-2008, 06:38
What a lovely, warm welcome! It's not that I'm such a good writer, it's more that Dad was a terrific story teller and teacher. I have several large plastic containers full of his letters and one of these days I shall sort them into chronological order and then read them all from start to finish. My son (named after Dad) will get them when I shuffle off.

Floridablade, I lived in New Orleans for many years and my son still lives across the lake from NO. I was down there after Katrina, helping animals in the Lower 9th Ward. My last professional job was as a crime stringer for a North Carolina TV station. I saw first-hand how quickly public order disintegrates in a crisis when Hurricane Fran forced her way inland and battered the eastern half of NC. Most of the mayhem wasn't reported for fear of copycats. I vowed then to increase our stock of supplies and not venture outside until the National Guard was on scene. And I bought a shotgun and learned how to use it.

Your post brings back affectionate memories of the way people used to pull together and help each other. For instance, my parents were able to have a proper wedding cake because friends and family shared their ration coupons, a common occurrence extending even to the Queen's wedding cake. And I'm sure you remember the street parties to celebrate the Coronation. There was no plastic cutlery, of course, and housewives of the day would wrap different colored thread around the handles of their knives, forks and spoons so they could be returned to the rightful owners. I understand similar parties were given for the Jubilee celebrations. I wonder if they had trifles in those little paper bowls with rims like flower petals?

I used to pass the City Hall fairly often when I was at CGS. We lived in Walkley by then and I would walk past the back of the building, still showing blitz damage in the early sixties, on my way to Weston Park where I played truant from physics and chemistry by visiting the also still-damaged art gallery and museum. On cold days, I explored the hothouse, never knowing I would eventually LIVE in one! The museum staff must have known I was playing truant but never reported me. I loved that enormous stuffed polar bear! Remember that?

Speaking of things I loved about Sheffield, nowhere was more enchanting than the old fish, meat and veg market, built on the site of the castle, I believe. What a grand, soaring, echoing Victorian cathedral to edibles it was! Stone lions gushed water into troughs, marble slabs held glassy-eyed fish, artfully displayed, and one could buy small paper bags of cooked shrimp to consume while traversing the vast and bustling emporium. Knives flashed as sides of beef and enormous carcasses of cod were reduced to more suitable pieces. And what did THEY do with that fantastic epicurean palace? Chucked it away and built a boring white box featuring Woolworth's!

Amazing how long ago it all was and how different life is today, both there and here. I suppose we have, as we were told we would, become our parents! "In MY day. . . ."

Let me know if you ever make it up this way, Floridablade. I don't know where we could find dripping toast, but I do know where we can eat fresh shrimp while we watch pelicans and, if we're lucky, a great blue heron threading through the seagulls where the shrimp boats dock.

Floridablade
13-07-2008, 16:09
Yes I remember the old Sheffield so well, My uncles had greengrocery stalls in the veg. market and my mother would take one of us along to help carry the fruit and veg. home, she always insisted on paying but the money would be slipped to one of us and we saved it for bonfire night when mother would put on her new dress we bought from the kitty. She never asked where the money came from and I don't think she guessed either because we all had jobs delivering papers, I worked in a butchers shop at the bottom of Millmount Rd. when I was 11 years old making sausages and delivering meat in a basket. I had an accident one Saturday, a tin of tomatoes fell into the sausage meat but I didn't know because the edge of the bowl was above my head in the machine so I made sausages with a tomato flavour, there was a queue a mile long for those sausages and the boss gave me an extra threppany bit. He was a big jovial man but got mad if I scrubbed the block with hot water because it turned a cream colour.

We live in North Florida just S.W of Jacksonville and we've been up and down the east coast a few times when we had our motorhome. We would quite often follow route 17 instead of the I 95 all the way up across the Chesapeak by that tunnel bridge and into Baltimore east of Washington and Phillidelphia up to New York and beyond. Toured Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia visiting the Alexander Bell museum and finally crossing into Maine at Calais pronounced by the locals as Callas following that awesome drive in autumn of every shade of brown and orange with the occassional evergreen. back home to Broward. We met many people on our travels and get dozens of cards at christmas reminding us of those happy days.

Nodens
13-07-2008, 16:57
Iwas told on one of the days? water was completly shut off to the Penistone rd Langsett area,but one house on High house rd had a thin trickle of water still coming (down hill?) the word soon spread and for a couple of days a endless line going though this kitchen with pot& pans waiting for their turn to fill.

My mother told me there was an incendiary bomb dropped in Bamforth Street and it left a large crater in the road. It could have caused the water supply to be closed off but I can't find any more info about it.

Janner
13-07-2008, 18:07
My mother told me there was an incendiary bomb dropped in Bamforth Street and it left a large crater in the road. It could have caused the water supply to be closed off but I can't find any more info about it.
It would have been a High Explosive bomb to make a large hole in the road. We kids were taught along with our parents how to deal with incendiary bombs. We were issued with stirrup pumps, rather like a bicycle pump, the pump was placed in a bucket of water, we kids were instructed how to use the pump an adult on the business end of a short hose, the nozzle could be a jet or spray. The Germans later designed an exploding incendiary bomb, new instructions were issued for the person using the hose to shelter behind something like a chair. In the meantime we kids were still standing and pumping about 10ft away from the bomb, maybe we were dispensible.

Floridablade
13-07-2008, 20:20
Yes stirrup pumps were about as much use as a chocolate kettle in my opinion since a bucket of water would have done the same job. The gas masks were issued in a cardboard box but most people kept them in an Ostermilk tin and the babies had the ones which enclosed them completely. For families without a garden like so many living in back-backs they were issued with a steel box which doubled as a dining room table, that was their shelter. My father and older brother dug a very large hole in the back garden and dropped the Anderson into it then covered it but it was still about 18" above ground so it became a raised garden with paving slabs to make it safer. It became at bit of a showpiece, councillors would with dads permission bring people round to see how it should be done but most turned them into garden sheds, too lazy I suppose.

My grandmother had an incendiary bomb fall straight through the roof and two floors into the cellar but it was a dud. She hallucinated the night after the blitz in our shelter, she lived on her own in a large house, about how she could see the stars above her bed at night now, it was a beautiful clear full moon night, almost like dawn all night then it snowed and covered the scars as though nature didn't approve, or did nature try to hide the fact that it had created a monster in man.

Falls
13-07-2008, 20:37
Hi,

I thought this thread might have responses from more people who were actually there at the time of blitz, but I guess there are not many of us left or have access to the Forum.

I grew up on a street off the Wicker and was a pre-schooler at the time of the blitz. Now you are going to ask what would a young kid remember about all that. Quite a lot really.

Of course you remember things like the approx.time of day when something happened but whether it was a Tuesday or a Thursday is something you find out later.

First, Thursday December 12th, 1940 was not the first time the Lufwaffe had come looking for Sheffield. There had been a number of attempted raids over the city before that. How many raids: I don't know. Poeple who were out side on these nights on fire-watch will tell you that could hear the bombers overhead but they couldn't find the targets. What saved us was bad weather such as cloud and the terrible atmosheric polution from all the steelworks. I remember being awaken by the sirens quite a few times before the actual blitz. Even now if I happened to catch part of an old war-time film where the sirens sound. It still gives me a little chill.

Our nearest siren was across the Wicker on a building belonging to Balfour's. It was right behind what used to be Fredrick's butchers shop. The whaling sound it produced was really frightening to a kid as you struggled to get out of bed and make a start on putting on your siren suit over you pyjamas before your mum or dad came along and finished the job. Then it was off to the shelter.

What made December 12, 1940, different was the absence of both clould cover and smoke. A few reports make reference to it being a clear night with lots of stars. As far the Luftwaffe were concerned, it was near-perfect bombing conditions and they certainly made the most of it.

We went into the shelters on Stanley Street when the raid started but sometime sometime during the night, the police came and said we had to move. John Wood's lumber yard on Nursery st. had been hit by incendairies and was on fire. We moved to the cellar of a three-storey cutlery works on Andrews Street.

We were there until the end of the raid, including the big bang when the building shook and all the doors blew open. This big bang was later attributed to the 1000 kg bomb that went clear through the Wicker arch and blew up on the roadway below.

That old cutlery building was later incorporated into the works of Snow & co. It was only demolished a couple of years ago to make way for the new ring (link) road system in the Wicker area.

One other anecdote. A family member was due to start work in the lab at the Royal Infirmary on Monday December 16th, 1940. On the Saturday morning after the first raid, he received a post card from the hospital (post cards were the normal way of communicating with people when most didn't have telephones), saying don't come until the New Year.

When he did finally report for work, the grassed part in front of the hospital which may have once been a bowling green, was covered by tarpaulins. I think you can guess what was under the tarps.

Regards

Texas
14-07-2008, 18:02
I can remember being in the Anderson shelter at my Grandma's on Fox Street. I was seven at the time. The candles or nightlites causing condensation on the metal sides, we had a blanket over the entrance, my Grandad was outside giving us a report on what was happening over the City. Occasionaly the curtain would part a little and I got to see the sky glowing red, largely from Levicks shop on the corner of Fox St and School Board Hill,which had taken a couple of incendiarys It was only about 50 yards away and another couple of houses across the street were burning too.
It seemed the sky was on fire, full of sparks which I thought were bullets or something.
My Grandad went down to the house and fetched my Aunt's budgie, it had been forgotten when we all went to the shelter. My Aunt was having hysterics, I dont suppose she was on her own either.
Even now, the smell of a burning candle takes me back to that night.

Janner
14-07-2008, 19:20
I was 7yrs old when the war started, my younger brother was born in 1939.I can remember coming home after a summer holiday, probably Blackpool. In the front garden was a pile of corrugated iron sheets, some curved some straight, a heap of angle irons, a big sack of nuts,bolts and washers. The Anderson shelters were meant to be half below ground level, the excavated earth was piled on top of the shelter after it had been erected. I seem to remember the neighbours all helped each other with the graft involved. Near Hull there is a place called Eden camp ( I might not have the correct name) it was a POW camp. There is an Anderson air raid shelter there, its well worth a visit, no , I don't have shares in the place.

Bayern Blade
14-07-2008, 19:32
Next week I will be visiting a Herr Pürsch who was a Luftwaffe bomber pilot in the last war,flying Ju 88's.
I will ask him if he flew on any raids over Sheffield.
If it is any consolation he was shot down later in the war by an RAF night fighter over France and had to bale out!

Texas
18-07-2008, 18:43
Hey BB, if he says yes, tell him he missed.
I got to thinking about the amount of bomb damage,in what was my immediate vicinity back in those days. The majority seems to have been from incendiarys. There was a proper bomb on what was the 'Old Gardens', immediatly behind some houses at the top of Schoolboard Hill. It wrecked the houses and put out all the windows of Pye Bank school.
Then the only other proper bomb was in Rock Street, almost opposite the Rock Tavern. That was a big one, it flattened about four large houses. At the time people said it was a land mine, or something like a 1,000 pounder, but it did a great deal of damage and people were killed. I cant think of any other high explosives in the area, certainly can't remember any craters. We were situated in the middle, about 150 yards from each of them, not as bad as a lot of people in other parts of Sheffield, or in other parts of the country.

Tooeg
18-07-2008, 19:17
there used to be a hole in the ground next to the river rivelyn up river from the paddling pool on the right at the bottom of the commercial garden on roscoe bank.
We were always told it was a bomb crater.
The last time I was down there, about 20 ago it was filled in

Siren
19-07-2008, 10:35
Texas
There were other bombs that fell in that area. If you walked down Rock St from the bomb opposite the The Rock, about halfway down opposite Stone St one fell there and killed several people. You may remember the wall built in front of the site where the bus stop was. I think it was 95 Rock St
Keep going down Rock St there used to be a big space opposite Railway St. That was the site of the Vicarage that was completely destroyed by a bomb some said it was an air mine.

The other one I know about was one where an entire family were killed, a young mother and 4 children under 10yrs old. as well as the mothers,father.They lived at 119 Rock St but the place of death is recorded as the Fox St shelter. I think that shelter was at the junction of Fox St and Gray St built on the edge of what was "the old gardens" I'm sure you remember them. Three other people are listed as killed at 119 Rock St which I havent been able to workout what happened because I remember the house and it wasnt damaged. I can only guess they were in the shelter with the young family survived the explosion but died later at that address. Love to know what really happened. High explosives also fell on Pitsmoor Rd and Grove St resulting in deaths. Like you I only remember one crater the one opposite Pye Bank School, the others must have been filled in.

Siren

Texas
21-07-2008, 18:03
You really got me trawling through the memory Siren, and I faintly recollect the bomb site you mention further down Rock Street. But as far as sites on Pitsmoor Road and Grove Street, non whatsoever. Saying that, there was a site down the Bank at the junction of Grove St. Could that've been one of those you meant? I always thought it was the result of incendiarys.
Another one I now remember was almost at the bottom of Nottingham Street, on the right going down. I remember about '44 a gang of American military turning up to level it out and put the ashes on. There were kids from all over the place, on the cadge for gum and candy, more kids than soldiers.
I dont remember the shelter at the junction of Fox and Grey streets, that's disapeared in the mists of time also.

Siren
21-07-2008, 18:57
Texas
I remember the Nottingham St site it backed onto the houses on Thistle St and it seemed a large site to me.
I was born 2 yrs after the war ended so I dont have your first hand knowledge, but all the sites were still there not built on when I was a kid.
As for the shelter at Fox St Gray St Im not certain it was there, there were other bomb site at the junction of Fox St and Andover St (School Board Hill)
I'm still trying to establish exactly where the shelter was.
Did you know where the American soldiers were based that levelled Nottingham St?

Texas
22-07-2008, 17:58
Well the site at the junction of Fox and Andover was Levicks shop, he was a pal of my Uncle. It was due to incendiarys. Some of the houses across the road on Fox St too, and blast damage via the Rock St bomb.
No idea about the Americanos, they were a pioneer type unit, all ***** except for the goon in charge.

Floridablade
23-07-2008, 14:26
It was amazing how quickly the bomb sites were turned into used car lots and other activities.

wendy watts
24-07-2008, 09:47
We lived in Regent Court flats in Hillsborough during the blitz. I remember the sirens going off and we children had to put our gas masks on and go down to the shelters underneath the building. We stayed down there all night but heard the bombs clearly. I remember my mother told us that decoy buildings had been built on the moors outside Sheffield with a few lights lit inside them so that the Germans would think they were flying over sheffield and drop their bombs there. They did miss the major steelworks and airplane motor factories but the next morning when the all clear sounded and we left the shelter I was amazed to see that a whole row of houses nearly opposite our building was just a mass of rubble. So I gues that was a near miss but I was too young to be really frightened. My dad was in the RAF so every time the sirens went and we heard planes flying overhead Mom would say that dad was coming to ´get´the Germans. Many places in Sheffield remained bomb sites for many years after the war before any rebuilding was done.

biker
24-07-2008, 12:22
It was amazing how quickly the bomb sites were turned into used car lots and other activities.

I didnt think that there were many cars in use in Sheffield until the 1960,s.The bottom of the Moor had a lot of waste areas until the Moor was redeveloped in the 1960,s.

Texas
24-07-2008, 17:59
A lot of people are fond of reminicing about the good old days, how times were better then, when you could leave your doors open because everyone was trustworthy. I'm no different up to a point. But I remember clearly during the bombing, everybody getting to the shelter when the sirens went, and just leaving their doors on the latch. Some people found money or other stuff missing when they got back in the house. This happened on Fox Street and suspicion was placed on one of the local Air Raid Wardens. So times dont change all that much, or should I say human nature doesn't.

Floridablade
24-07-2008, 19:21
I didnt think that there were many cars in use in Sheffield until the 1960,s.The bottom of the Moor had a lot of waste areas until the Moor was redeveloped in the 1960,s.

Biker I think you'll find there were I had my first car in '54 and so did a mate of mine. The Moor sites were levelled and left but around Pitsmoor and Darnall there were many used car sites. There was one on London Rd. I remember going to have a look at a Ford Anglia there.

flyer
24-07-2008, 19:50
got a extra pasting for running away from Fullwood Homes during the blitz ,(wasting petrol) must have been 2nd day because i remember Sheffield in flames which we watched from the Homes,Ithink we were gone for about 4-5 days that time,also it was proberly the 1st time something sunk in ,relief mothers boy friend was just lost at sea(bringing us petrol) she cried & gave us hell for a week,but all was forgiven when he was found picked up ,Whew,.Please note I did say Petrol NOT gas so not all is lost

billlaunty
01-01-2009, 11:39
bombed out at all the confusion about dates of sheffield blitz
especialy dates by cynthia who like me was bombed out by the blitz
which started on the 11th dec and started again on the sunday 13th
and I was bombed out again my neighbors on foxglove got a direct hit
on their shelter and caused havoc on the flower estate and looking at
the flower estate to-day it looks like hitler called again'
billy launt

sheffsal
01-01-2009, 17:27
on the night marples got bombed; my dad was on a tram on his way to meet his then girlfriend outside marples, the tram stopped in the wicker when the siren went off and he took shelter in the big gun cellars, he stayed there all night and he said when they came out the next morning, the big wooden door of the pub had been blown off, he also said he had a 'bit' of an hangover hehehe - I always wonder what happened to his then girlfriend???

ZanebA
01-02-2009, 11:16
I noticed that there had been bombs around the Jenkin Road area of Brightside, does anyone have any idea if an air raid post was hit there. My mother always told a story about it and I would love to know if it was true. Thanks Anita

My family moved to Limpsfield Road in 1969. There were still lots of neighbours around who had lived there from the war time and earlier.

I remember one of our neighbours telling of the blitz and how her whole roof was taken off - one of many in a row of terraced housing.
I lived at no. 12, the first house on our side of the street, all those before had been bombed into destruction. There were apparently houses that ran from the bottom of Limpsfied Rd to Dearne Str, but they had also been flattened as had the houses that ran from Limpsfield Rd heading towards Grimesthorpe - this area in particular was the play ground of my generation.
The reason given to me as a child for the bombing was the steels works and railway lines were the target for the Germans to hinder Britains' war effort.

I used to bring home all sorts of artifacts from the fields where the houses once stood, the largest being an advertising board made in steel and enamelled in Blue - I can't remember the advert but mum pulled it out from under my bed, once found, and threw my treasure away.

I distinctly remember digging my way down the cellar stairs of the no longer existing remains of 10 Limpsfied Road, only to be ordered by my father to fill it all back in - I still yearn to unearth that cellar to discover the moment time froze it when it was buried back in 1940.

Another thing that just came to mind, nothing to do with the blitz, more the war effort - if true, nobody on our Road or in the area had railings in their front gardens, they had all been removed to provide raw material for the factories.

mikep57
01-02-2009, 16:15
At the beginning of the war, the church records of Gleadless Methodist Church were sent for safety to a church at the bottom of the Moor which was bombed and the records destroyed. Does anyone know whether copies were made prior to this to a central registry somewhere or has that information gone for good?

hollyberry
01-02-2009, 20:10
I am doing my dissertation on the Sheffield Blitz and the impact of this on the working class. I'm wanting to look at all aspects of life from the impact on jobs to living conditions to social life so if anyone that was there could help me I would really appreciate it.

thankyou
sarah

There is a book about it and we have a copy somewhere. My aunty Nora (Kendall) was killed in Laurel Works. She was aged 23yrs old. Her family were devastated. The working class had most to fear as they were working in the factories which were Germany's target. For living conditions you could not do better than chat to the family history societies and Heeley History Society which meets weekly. EMail if you want more.