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paddywac
05-10-2004, 14:40
I was just reading a thread and a phrase popped up that made me realise that moving to Sheffield may require more research! Are ther any typically Sheffield words/phrases that I, as a newcomer, should learn?

t020
05-10-2004, 15:19
Many Sheffielders have the inability to distinguish between "while" and "until" (though I've never understood why). You may often hear people saying "I'm working 9 WHILE 1", but beware of more confusing examples like "Don't cross WHILE the green man comes on".

BoroughGal
05-10-2004, 17:11
There used to be a brilliant book in the early 80's, that many of you will remember - "Sheffieldish - a Beginners Guide" (the one with the pink cover). It taught the reader a number of Sheffield phases in a real funny way. I'm not sure whether you can still get it anymore new, but this link may help you get it used...?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0900660627/qid%3D1096995933/026-5794667-0740410

The only problem is... I'm not sure how funny it'd be for someone not originally from the area ???

So... anyone else remember this book or any of the phrases in it??

Strix
05-10-2004, 17:29
Are you a bloke, Paddywack? Don't panic if a bus driver calls you 'Love'. It's nothing personal. Pretend he called you 'mate'.

Although BUNS in Liverpool are for making butties, Sheffield BUNS are sweet and sticky.

'Be reet' is intended to mean 'it will be alright', but can be translated as 'I don't give a stuff, it's your problem'. So be VERY careful of that one!

extaxman
05-10-2004, 18:51
Do you know what 'mardy' means?

Every Sheffielder does but most of them have a lot of difficulty telling outsiders just what it means. Anybody care to try - must admit it's beyond me.

Strix
05-10-2004, 18:53
misery-guts in some parts of the country

ladyovmanor
05-10-2004, 18:54
Originally posted by extaxman
Do you know what 'mardy' means?

Every Sheffielder does but most of them have a lot of difficulty telling outsiders just what it means. Anybody care to try - must admit it's beyond me.

Whiney, whingey, miserable, grizzly.

vidster
05-10-2004, 19:08
A good start would be to watch Fred Dibnah on tv. If you can understand him, you will not be far off!

t020 wrote:
Many Sheffielders have the inability to distinguish between "while" and "until" (though I've never understood why). You may often hear people saying "I'm working 9 WHILE 1", but beware of more confusing examples like "Don't cross WHILE the green man comes on".

I have never even noticed that discrepancy until now!. I guess i am a Sheffielder through and through :)

nsiebert
06-10-2004, 08:39
I use the word "mardy" and I live in New Zealand and no-one has heard of it,
We used to call people "mardy bum", if kids were grissly crying, not getting there own way etc.

danielford99
06-10-2004, 09:43
As a Sheffielder myself there are a few you must listen out for:

Oreight - Hello
Be reight - It will be OK
Mashin - Making a cup of tea
Neow - No
Goodun - Good one
E'ad - Head
Snap - Food

These may well be known throughout the Country, just thought they may confuse you a bit!.

Dan

wibbles
06-10-2004, 10:18
I'll not even go into the whole fishcake, rissole arguement

t020
06-10-2004, 12:33
Originally posted by danielford99

Snap - Food


WTF?! How??? :huh:

paddywac
06-10-2004, 12:48
I was thinking that too, but thought it would be rude to point it out! lol
How do you use the word 'mashin'?

Thanks anyway, though.

sarah_d
06-10-2004, 12:51
My mum says that when referring to making my dad's pack lunch.I don't use much Yorkshire slang now 'cos i'm in London and i'm fed up of explaining myself!The odd one will slip in now and again though.

max
06-10-2004, 12:52
Originally posted by t020
WTF?! How??? :huh:

As in 'wha's tha got for thee snap?'

t020
06-10-2004, 13:21
Originally posted by max
As in 'wha's tha got for thee snap?'


I meant how is "snap" linked to the word "food" in any way?

max
06-10-2004, 13:35
Originally posted by t020
I meant how is "snap" linked to the word "food" in any way?

Sorry, forgot to translate. A snap tin is something in which one puts food for eating when away from one's home. Snap, therefore, is food.

Added:

However, meticulous research shows that snap is not peculiar to Sheffield. This quote:

Snap - Originally this was a packed lunch carried by coal miners (in a snap tin) nowadays it means food in general

comes from an East Midlands site:

Long Eaton site (http://archive.long-eaton.com/words.asp)

t020
06-10-2004, 14:08
I see... kind of. But to be called a "snap tin" in the first place, snap must have meant food anyway. Is it just onomatopoeic?

ladyovmanor
06-10-2004, 18:00
an after tha's finished thee snap tha can av sum SPICE.......

nsiebert
06-10-2004, 18:25
Oh memories, my accent is still broad, but lost a lot of the little phrases, my Mother in law couldnt understand me when I came to New Zealand, but I remember "snap",

extaxman
06-10-2004, 19:23
What about 'causie' short for causeway (or pavement).

There's also 'sough grate' which means a drainage grate in a gutter. Think this is derived from an old lead mining term meaning drain as in Calver Sough.

nsiebert
07-10-2004, 02:37
extaxman
I remember cossie, as in swimming cossie, not the others

jessycar
07-10-2004, 21:21
"washing pots" this is used to confuse my ex coursemate who was from Bucks heehee

nsiebert
08-10-2004, 02:09
I still say "washing the pots"
Pots in New Zealand are saucepans.

giy us anuther one

paddywac
08-10-2004, 08:59
I don't mean to be rude, but being told all the slang is only helpful if it comes with an explanation!

Thanks for the 'snap' help, but what did I read about 'SPICE'?

And what's the reference to 'washing pots'?

I'm confused already and I'm a couple of hundred miles away! LOL

vidster
08-10-2004, 12:55
Originally posted by paddywac
I don't mean to be rude, but being told all the slang is only helpful if it comes with an explanation!

Thanks for the 'snap' help, but what did I read about 'SPICE'?

And what's the reference to 'washing pots'?

I'm confused already and I'm a couple of hundred miles away! LOL

'Spice' = Sweets
'Washing (or washin) Pots' = Cleaning the dishes after lunch etc.

sccsux
08-10-2004, 16:31
Originally posted by t020
I see... kind of. But to be called a "snap tin" in the first place, snap must have meant food anyway.

Maybe, when you closed the tin, it did so with a "snap"? Bit like the CD holders in Wilkinsons ;-)

tara
08-10-2004, 17:18
heard a few people say snap but not sure if its a sheffield word as
we've always said packin up. I think snap is a miners word.
my dad's always says grub for food.

Raychul69
08-10-2004, 17:35
Although I don't hear many people say it but bread has been called money. Is this a national thing or just something us Sheffielders came up with????


Eh???? - I beg your pardon
Iamptgorrit - I haven't got it
Putwoodintoyal -put the wood in the hole i.e. shut the door
nahden - now then
sylin down - Raining
nesh - feeling cold when others don't, or being unnecessarily frightenend
Eenosenowtabartit - means He knows nothing about it



Once thas gorrup ta speed have a go on this link an see ar tha dooin :D

Test (http://www.funtrivia.com/playquiz.cfm?qid=16474&origin=http://translationinfo.net/search.php_QN_q=yorkshire+slang)

sccsux
08-10-2004, 19:19
Originally posted by tara

my dad's always says grub for food.

Maggots or Caterpillars? ;-)

nsiebert
08-10-2004, 20:03
I love it
I have been away too long I think, the memories are pouring back,
I remember nesh, snap, packup, spice, mash and also have a brew.

I watch coronation street to keep up with some of it "nowadays"
I remember giyusone (give me one) if someone wanted one of my "spice" (sweets)
"geeor" (giveover) as in pack it in or stop it

depoix
09-10-2004, 15:51
a snap tin was the shape of a slice of bread from an uncut loaf....it was made of metal and was about two inches deep...it came in two parts.one part had your sandwhich in, the other half snapped over the top of it...........this was to prevent mice and rats eating your food while you were working down the pit.....your basic plastic lunch box would,nt have lasted a minute due to the pit vermin..as an added security we used to hang ours up to make it even harder for the rats to get it

TRANSLATION
thi snap tin wu med o alli ,s ,pit moggies **** git to bite thru it f thi snap...oreight?

depoix
09-10-2004, 15:56
the four x,s in last post represent the sheffield slang word for " could not " you,ll hear it a lot but its nothing personal...

tara
09-10-2004, 16:17
didnt you mean money has been called bread.- rachul69.
dont think that slang word originated in sheffield.
didn't it start out as old hippy word.

Pete1024
09-10-2004, 19:26
You forgot duck. duck.

nsiebert
09-10-2004, 20:23
Yeh, I thought same as Tara for "bread", I thought it was popular in the sixties,

Raychul69
10-10-2004, 19:51
Just realised what I put I meant Money was called bread not bread was called money!!! he he:D

Macca
11-10-2004, 17:15
Greetings

Do you not remember the god awful 'sitcom' "bread"?

Written by a scouser - so it can't be unique to Sheff

nsiebert
11-10-2004, 18:10
I remember that programme.
Had that bloke in it with his rabbits, he was in another comedy also

ladyovmanor
11-10-2004, 19:07
Originally posted by nsiebert
I remember that programme.
Had that bloke in it with his rabbits, he was in another comedy also

huh? :confused:

nsiebert
12-10-2004, 05:36
There was a man on the programme "Bread" and he kept rabitts in the back I think
He was the bloke that in real life was married to Gail from Coronation Street,
Sorry have I gone off the subject and confused everyone.

maggyirene
12-10-2004, 14:07
some other phrases
gerroutatheanahh means get out of therenow
gerroftheesenn get off yourself
ifthaaduntgeor aslclippthee if you dont giveover i will hit you
sarnies was the most used one for lunch that i know of
or athaagonnachipole are you going to the chip shop

scottf
12-10-2004, 15:29
lugoyle is ear!!!

Bloomdido
17-10-2004, 23:51
The bloke who kept rabbits in the back was in 'Boys from the Blackstuff'. He was married to the Julie Walters character. Yosser was in it too - 'Gissa Job. I can do that'. How could you get the two confused?
Ken Bleasdale I think. Certainly wasn't no comedy but it had it's moments. Chrissy he was called. I remember he shot the rabbits.

nsiebert
18-10-2004, 03:04
was I confused, I am sure they all sat round a big table in the kitchen, dont remember that programme being in NZ, may be wrong though

fhain29
26-10-2004, 09:34
Something which is also Sheffieldish is to have a pot on your leg, meaning having your leg (or arm) in plaster.

And don't worry, it's a just a local annoying habit for people, when writing dialect (NOT slang) to forget syntax andwriteallthewordstogetherlikethis.

Here's a thing from the BBC about the problems Austrian doctors had in South Yorkshire. It's about Doncaster, which is a bit different, but OK as an introduction.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/south_yorkshire/3724110.stm

Enjoy thisen!

nsiebert
26-10-2004, 18:24
I still call it a pot on the leg, and that website is interesting, I have sent it to a couple of people, dont remember the one for vomitting though.
When I first came to NZ, people had trouble understanding me also, but now I have no problems, but its sad to think I have lost some of the slang also, as it was part of my life back then.
Its great to catch up on all these old memories

deano
30-10-2004, 19:25
Originally posted by nsiebert
I remember that programme.
Had that bloke in it with his rabbits, he was in another comedy also
Liver birds, one of the girls brothers, lucien he was called,wasn't in bread i don't think(sorry bit off topic)
Was really surprised "washing the pots" was unique to sheffield, something i say without a second thought.

Illaria
30-10-2004, 19:58
For the longest time i used to have a piece of paper with different phrases on that were "Yorkshire" and you got scored out of 25 if you understood them all. It varied from things like
"tintintin" ??????
"Weerz mi dad"
"Weeve gorra gerrus hymbuks"
"Mi dads gorra jag"
"nah den dee wot dah doin"

It was fantastic but lost it when i moved house :(

But all I can say for anyone moving to Sheffield is its great, friendly, fun, lovely buildings, and the dialect is awesome :clap:

nsiebert
31-10-2004, 01:27
Deano
That right, I remember now, it was the Liver Birds, I must have got my wires crossed.
That chap Lucien in real life was married to Gail from Coronation Street, I think they seperated ages ago.

Some re-runs on TV of the Liver Birds would be good too.

Insanity
01-11-2004, 21:39
Originally posted by extaxman
Do you know what 'mardy' means?

Every Sheffielder does but most of them have a lot of difficulty telling outsiders just what it means. Anybody care to try - must admit it's beyond me.

yep!!!!!! my boyfriend who's from Sheffield/Rotherham area ocasionally calls me a 'Mardy' - i have no idea wtf it is!.....and the word 'reet' is used alot also, 'the phrase 'what's going off' whereas I would say 'whats going on' !?!

vidster
01-11-2004, 21:51
Originally posted by Insanity
yep!!!!!! my boyfriend who's from Sheffield/Rotherham area ocasionally calls me a 'Mardy' - i have no idea wtf it is!.....and the word 'reet' is used alot also, 'the phrase 'what's going off' whereas I would say 'whats going on' !?!

Thats easy! Mardy means eerrrmmm....... MARDY!!:thumbsup:

owdlad
02-11-2004, 10:16
Mardy. Surely it means havin a pet lip on, or blog on, tup on, face on, cob on, got the hump, bag on, oh sod this am getting Mardy just writing about it. :(

ToryCynic
02-11-2004, 12:37
Originally posted by Insanity
yep!!!!!! my boyfriend who's from Sheffield/Rotherham area ocasionally calls me a 'Mardy' - i have no idea wtf it is!.....and the word 'reet' is used alot also, 'the phrase 'what's going off' whereas I would say 'whats going on' !?!

Sulky/un-alkative/peed off.

Alex

NatalieSheff
02-11-2004, 13:02
if you struggle with sheff dont go to barnsley!! my god! its the craziest accent i have ever heard

vidster
02-11-2004, 16:15
Originally posted by owdlad
Mardy. Surely it means havin a pet lip on, or blog on, tup on, face on, cob on, got the hump, bag on, oh sod this am getting Mardy just writing about it. :(
Class! :hihi:

Insanity
02-11-2004, 19:10
sheffield ites never say the word 'the' in fact that goes for most Northerners , I've known !!!

t'fence

t'owld lad

vidster
03-11-2004, 00:20
Originally posted by Insanity
sheffield ites never say the word 'the' in fact that goes for most Northerners , I've known !!!

t'fence

t'owld lad
I worked in a shop for a few years and every time i said 'the', i felt uncomfortable. I don't know why, it must be a Sheffield thing?

t020
03-11-2004, 01:09
Originally posted by vidster
I worked in a shop for a few years and every time i said 'the', i felt uncomfortable. I don't know why, it must be a Sheffield thing?

No not at all.

missrabbit
03-11-2004, 11:58
i move all around england but am originally from sheffield and the things i say people always pick up on! s-o-t dont no what a bread cake is and mimick everything that i say that ends in 'ey' i also say alright pronounced alr8 and to them its like ive landed on earth from a different planet, but i will never understand why they say 'i arnt' instead of i am not!!!!

t020
03-11-2004, 17:09
Originally posted by missrabbit
but i will never understand why they say 'i arnt' instead of i am not!!!!

"I aren't" would be grammatically incorrect. I'm not sure this is part of any dialect - just people who can't speak English properly.

Illaria
07-11-2004, 09:44
Think i'd go with "m'not" or "I aint" than "I aren't", this mardy thing is great erm, my description would be........
Can't get ya own way so thas got face on, sulking, moaning, feeling petty, ignoring people till ya get ya own way = being mardy.

Lostrider
07-11-2004, 21:31
Originally posted by t020
I see... kind of. But to be called a "snap tin" in the first place, snap must have meant food anyway. Is it just onomatopoeic?

I remember my dads snap tin, it was metal and had a metal clasp which "snapped shut". I think it may have been a mining thing to keep the dust out. He also used to have a "mashing tin".
The most disgusting thing he used to take down the pit was banana and olive oil sandwiches (the oil was to stop the banana going brown and sliced udder sandwiches - yuk.

awoollen
08-11-2004, 10:12
Originally posted by nsiebert
I still say "washing the pots"
Pots in New Zealand are saucepans.

giy us anuther one
what about the packin up for work meaning your sandwiches
like iv packed the sardine sandwiches

nsiebert
08-11-2004, 17:15
pack up or packin up, was something we always said in our house.
We also used to wrap our 'pack up' in tin foil, to keep it fresh, before the days of cellophane wrap,

GJ2004
08-11-2004, 20:52
Originally posted by paddywac
I was just reading a thread and a phrase popped up that made me realise that moving to Sheffield may require more research! Are ther any typically Sheffield words/phrases that I, as a newcomer, should learn?

you may like to get hold of a book called "sheffieldish a beginners phrase book" by derek whomersley, published by publicity dept sheffield city council, ISBN 0 900660 627

GJ2004
08-11-2004, 20:54
Originally posted by BoroughGal
There used to be a brilliant book in the early 80's, that many of you will remember - "Sheffieldish - a Beginners Guide" (the one with the pink cover). It taught the reader a number of Sheffield phases in a real funny way. I'm not sure whether you can still get it anymore new, but this link may help you get it used...?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0900660627/qid%3D1096995933/026-5794667-0740410

The only problem is... I'm not sure how funny it'd be for someone not originally from the area ???

So... anyone else remember this book or any of the phrases in it??

yes we have still got a copy, the non sheffielders that we have shown it to have found it funny

Fowler
09-11-2004, 14:10
Most importantly the two most common sheffield words in my opinion are

Thee = You
Tha = You

Both mean the same but are dependant on the context they are used in.

Wattsy
09-11-2004, 15:18
The Slang: If tha dunt shurup rurin i'll gi thi summat t' rua fo

Translated into English means

If you dont stop crying i will give you something to cry for (I Think)

GJ2004
09-11-2004, 16:54
Originally posted by Fowler
Most importantly the two most common sheffield words in my opinion are

Thee = You
Tha = You

Both mean the same but are dependant on the context they are used in.

I thought it was DEE & DA ias i always new it as the DEE DA language

Wots Da dooin Dee = what are you doing you

nsiebert
09-11-2004, 17:11
I think we used all those words, Dee Da, Tha and Thee.
and roaring for crying was a common one for my Dad to use.
For myself gerof, for "get off" was something I said quite a bit, in fact I may still use it if I think about it.

awoollen
10-11-2004, 05:19
Originally posted by t020
Many Sheffielders have the inability to distinguish between "while" and "until" (though I've never understood why). You may often hear people saying "I'm working 9 WHILE 1", but beware of more confusing examples like "Don't cross WHILE the green man comes on".
got thay rong mate its 10 while 6

vinceb
10-11-2004, 12:26
'Tha'/'thou' is used as the object, 'thee' as the subject, and the two are never mixed up as far as I remember (from a childhood in Sheffield about twenty years ago). Consider a few examples:
"Tha's a right gob****e" - correct.
"Thee's a right gob****e" - incorrect.
"I'm gonna smack thee" - correct.
"I'm gonna smack thou" - incorrect.

--
Vince

nsiebert
10-11-2004, 17:23
shut ya gob
I remember that one

mojoworking
10-11-2004, 23:42
Originally posted by Lostrider
I remember my dads snap tin, it was metal and had a metal clasp which "snapped shut". I think it may have been a mining thing to keep the dust out. He also used to have a "mashing tin".
The most disgusting thing he used to take down the pit was banana and olive oil sandwiches (the oil was to stop the banana going brown and sliced udder sandwiches - yuk.

Snap tins are army issue and were originally used by blokes who brought them back from the war in 1945. Later they could be bought from army surplus stores and the like.

saxon76tr
11-11-2004, 09:31
What about " He`s got monk on"
or "a full eard er monk"? :loopy:

nuf_said
13-11-2004, 21:45
All accents and dialects are at least interesting and at best are bl**ming brilliant. Be proud of yours.

muddycoffee
20-11-2004, 10:26
In Derbyshire, especially chesterfield they call sheffielders Dee Daas because of our accents. They also use Yourn for "you all" this is very interesting because it reflects old english, before the language became simplified and we just got You.
Also a breadcake there is a cobb.

There is much debate as to where the term snap came from, and I understand from history programmes that It goes back to the heavy industry and mining of a century a go, long before snap tins. Where the wife would prepare the family's main meal and snap a bit off for her husband, the breadwinner, to put him on at lunchtime so he could have enough energy to make it through to tea time.

* Gennel (pronounced Jen-nell) sheffield (Hillsborough) term for alley between houses. Not passage which is part of a terrace.
* Chayyze - Cheese
* Mashin Tackle - Kettle
* A - Potta Teeyer - Cup of tea (stocksbridge accent)
* A - Potta Teeyer - Cup of Coffee (still called tea)
* Chukkin your guts/Chukkin up/Honking up/to Vom - To Vomit
* Giggs - Eye glasses (not sure if this is sheffield or just slang)
* Ten Denk - a ten pence piece (not heaard this since school)
* Scosh - School
* Togger - Football
* Tail - Penis (jarvis cocker kept jonathon ross entertained with this one!)
* Areighhht/reight - Means Hello ) or OK? or yes thankyou sir and how are you too (similar to AYE in scots) this word is expressed very agressively the accent being on the (gh) and the beggining of the word is quiet. Southerners hearing two locals having an exchange like this thinks that there's a fight about to start. They'd be wrong.

Just thought of some more..
* Coil (pronounced Coy-Yil) - Coal
* Coil Oyil - Coal Store (coal hole)
* Tap Oyil - The Pub's Tap Room (Tap Hole)
* Best Oyil - Pub Lounge (Best Hole)
* Bog - The Lavatory

letting
20-11-2004, 16:47
what appens when sheffield meets black country arr kid ?

Carborundum
24-11-2004, 23:02
As an outsider - I have heard the phrase "a right bag of mashings" applied to items at work - what does this mean ?

is it equivalent to a "load of rubbish" and how did it originate - is a mashin a "used tea bag" ?

muddycoffee
25-11-2004, 07:32
A Right Bag O Mashins

I would imagine it's the same as one of my favourites

A Right Bugger's Muddle

Something that looks complecated. Like lots of pipes/Wires which aren't marked up

Nesh
25-11-2004, 13:22
slang ??sheffield?? are tha daft??
*L*
its a bleeding foreign country here. While/until..snap/lunch...keks/undies

Apex
26-11-2004, 00:45
Originally posted by NatalieSheff
if you struggle with sheff dont go to barnsley!! my god! its the craziest accent i have ever heard

Where not that bad are we ?

t020
26-11-2004, 13:39
Originally posted by Apex
Where not that bad are we ?

Apparently so on this evidence. :rolleyes:

StarSparkle
26-11-2004, 19:36
Originally posted by muddycoffee


* Gennel (pronounced Jen-nell) sheffield (Hillsborough) term for alley between houses. Not passage which is part of a terrace.


As a native of Edinburgh now living in Sheffield, I can confirm the word Gennel (pronounced Jen-nell, as you say) is also in use in Edinburgh, meaning lane or alley.

In Edinburgh, 'breadcakes' and 'baps' etc are just called 'rolls' - took me ages to get used to the different terms for different sizes of rolls! I think it's because generally in English bakeries there's a much bigger variety of savoury items, whereas Scots specialise in sugary/sweet things!

Language is a fascinating thing!

StarSparkle :)

jayne67
27-11-2004, 16:42
Originally posted by muddycoffee
In Derbyshire, especially chesterfield they call sheffielders Dee Daas because of our accents. They also use Yourn for "you all" this is very interesting because it reflects old english, before the language became simplified and we just got You.
Also a breadcake there is a cobb.

There is much debate as to where the term snap came from, and I understand from history programmes that It goes back to the heavy industry and mining of a century a go, long before snap tins. Where the wife would prepare the family's main meal and snap a bit off for her husband, the breadwinner, to put him on at lunchtime so he could have enough energy to make it through to tea time.

* Gennel (pronounced Jen-nell) sheffield (Hillsborough) term for alley between houses. Not passage which is part of a terrace.
* Chayyze - Cheese
* Mashin Tackle - Kettle
* A - Potta Teeyer - Cup of tea (stocksbridge accent)
* A - Potta Teeyer - Cup of Coffee (still called tea)
* Chukkin your guts/Chukkin up/Honking up/to Vom - To Vomit
* Giggs - Eye glasses (not sure if this is sheffield or just slang)
* Ten Denk - a ten pence piece (not heaard this since school)
* Scosh - School
* Togger - Football
* Tail - Penis (jarvis cocker kept jonathon ross entertained with this one!)
* Areighhht/reight - Means Hello ) or OK? or yes thankyou sir and how are you too (similar to AYE in scots) this word is expressed very agressively the accent being on the (gh) and the beggining of the word is quiet. Southerners hearing two locals having an exchange like this thinks that there's a fight about to start. They'd be wrong.

Just thought of some more..
* Coil (pronounced Coy-Yil) - Coal
* Coil Oyil - Coal Store (coal hole)
* Tap Oyil - The Pub's Tap Room (Tap Hole)
* Best Oyil - Pub Lounge (Best Hole)
* Bog - The Lavatory

wharra baht chip oyil

nuf_said
27-11-2004, 16:53
Originally posted by Patrick2000
As an outsider - I have heard the phrase "a right bag of mashings" applied to items at work - what does this mean ?

is it equivalent to a "load of rubbish" and how did it originate - is a mashin a "used tea bag" ?

Perhaps from the brewing industry - mashings was the mucky mess of solids left after part of the process.

Another unusual word in Sheffield is bonny. Here it means chubby - but in the rest of the world it means beautiful as in 'Bonny Scotland' - fat Scotland surely not?

StarSparkle
27-11-2004, 18:36
Originally posted by nuf_said
Another unusual word in Sheffield is bonny. Here it means chubby - but in the rest of the world it means beautiful as in 'Bonny Scotland' - fat Scotland surely not?

I may be talking complete rubbish here, but I've always taken 'bonny' to mean pretty in a healthy, pink-cheeked sort of way, rather than strictly beautiful.

Perhaps being pretty in a healthy-looking way equated to being a bit chubby, in the days before stick-thin models came to represent physical attractiveness? Then the Sheffield meaning of 'bonny' would be very close to the Scottish meaning?

nsiebert
27-11-2004, 19:16
People call babys bonny meaning "nice looking, healthy and I have also heard it to mean chubby also,
Someone called my Grandson who is 5 months old bonny the other day, and he is a bit chubby, but also a cute looking healthy baby, so I took it as all of those meanings.

Chip Oyl, is one I remember very well

Plain Talker
28-11-2004, 16:01
My late uncle settled in Birmingham, after he completed his university course studies, there.

He got in 'courting' with a Birmingham lass, and he brought her up here to sheffield, to "meet the family". I remember this incident so clearly, even though I couldn't have been more than about 6 or7 yrs old.

When my mother welcomed her, mum suggested that they go to the kitchen, to help mum 'mash' a cuppa for us all.

The poor young woman was most puzzled, and tried to pass my mum the potato masher down from the 'Skyline' (utensil) set, hanging on the wall.

As you can imagine, the misunderstanding caused much amusement!

With regard to the "Your'n" for yours, there is another one or two, similar words, such as "shoon" for shoes, and Troon" for Trews (trousers). I believe it harks back to the old norse way of making plurals in speech.

There's a few norse words that we still use, here in the north, to a greater or lesser degree, such as "gate" which is norse for street or road; thorpe which means "farmstead", and bairn for child.

and, who of us can forgetthis??

Being told by their mothers to
"gee'owe'r, tee-amin' an' ladlin' the watter" (please cease pouring the water back and forth between the containers you have there!" she says in her best BBC english! LOL)
(or in the same context being asked by an older person to "tee-am the Tea") "teem" being a norse word for "Pour" or how about "it's Tee-amin' it down! meaning 'to pout down with rain'.

There is also the phrase "siling" it down which means the same thing:- it's pouring down with rain.

I was 'thrown' a year or two back, on visiting Nottingham, for the football with the blades. We went into a Chippie, near the footy ground, and asked for "a Chip Buttie, please". the chippie staff 'gormed' (looked askance) at us, and we finally got past the language barrier, and realised that what we were asking for was, in their dialect, a "chip-bap" . a chip bap, for goodness sake. It's as bad as going into lancashire and having to translate breadcake into 'barm-cake' (or toBarnsley,a nd having the choice between a 'tee-ar-cake' (plain breadcake) or a 'Friwwut-tee-ar-cake'- a fruited breadcake, or, what Sheffielders call a 'teacake'

and, finally, I remember school being referred to as "skoy-ull"

PT

nsiebert
28-11-2004, 17:19
PT, you are very knowledgable on this slang thing

I still use siling down, teamin down, and here in NZ they couldnt understand me, as for gormless that is a great word.

What about pikelets, and crumpets, the white things with the holes in the top that you toast and butter,
They are crumpets here, I called them pikelets, but pikelets here are a flat brown thing made of batter,
Crisps are in a bag, but are chips here and the things from the chippie are "hot chips".
As for pronouncing things, here scones are pronounced scons, and yogurt is pronounced yo-gurt, as in yoyo.
Rugby is football and football is soccer, I tell you,
There is now a kiwi dictionary, does anyone know if there is a Yorkshire dictionary.

chezlyn
03-12-2004, 17:25
When I was at school, Mum used to do us a 'pack up' for our packed lunch sandwiches, but in Rotherham they called it 'snap'. I used to use the word 'ge-or' (give over) or 'shurrup' (shut up) a lot when my sister was trying to annoy me. Mum used to tell us to stop 'tip-tapping' (poking each other at the table). And what about 'tittle-tackling' - meaning to gossip about other people.

philyyy
12-12-2004, 20:46
I am under the impression that snap relates to the sound of the sandwich box as you open it at snap time. May have made this all up but it's the best I can manage.

bigkev
03-01-2005, 22:50
I wish me grandad was still around he could tell you some of the slang of sheffield,when I use to work in the forge and had to be up at 04:00am he always got up with me and he use to say hey up dont forget the booits when thaw gos out,old ma has done thee dripping for snap.what times that finnished nip see the up rooad for a vessel I will be in the dram shop waiting for thee and that was every morning on the sunday morning we had to go over the cut to the pigeon coites and let out the brood for some excerise I use to sit on the wooden step with the can in my hand rattling the corn so that we could get them down then it was up to see the other pigeon fellas for a chat and a plug.nah then youngun are thee sending towd pigeons to race this year or we too good for thee then. so after that it was sort out the ringers and nobble them you do know what nobble them means to ring there necks hey youngun give them a reight good twist tha should hear it snap and thats all there is to it and where did they go straight in the cut as with everything else dead dogs and cats in the cut thats where they went. so it was the off to thee ale house for a few jars down the neck all the plugs would get passed round to see who had got the strongest and the sweetest !

muddycoffee
04-01-2005, 21:12
Originally posted by philyyy
I am under the impression that snap relates to the sound of the sandwich box as you open it at snap time. May have made this all up but it's the best I can manage.

Why don't you look at the previous page here :-

http://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/showthread.php?s=&threadid=18324&perpage=15&pagenumber=6

for the correct origin for the word snap...
Which by the way came long before there was a tin to put it in

bobsyouruncle
10-01-2005, 10:40
worabart "thad best geyor? "if tha dunt geyor thee, thas gunna gerran eyedin off thi fathur wen ee cums oowum.

translated= what about "you had better give over. if you dont you will be punished by your father when he returns!!

Lucy_Green
10-01-2005, 11:53
:| :hihi: :heyhey: :clap: :rolleyes: :cool:

Don_Kiddick
10-01-2005, 23:45
CHECK THIS OUT :hihi: :thumbsup:

www.ayup.co.uk/avina/laugh3.html

And then the homepage, shop etc

www.ayup.co.uk/index2.html

www.ayup.co.uk/shop/index.htm

bobsyouruncle
16-01-2005, 15:05
jus been to the wbsite shown above to av a look at all this yorkshire stuff, and its all priced up in friggin american dollars!! how yorkshire is that? ee, i ask ya....:huh: :shocked:
:loopy:

nsiebert
16-01-2005, 18:58
I have just had a look at the website too,
Liked the article on the Yorkshire Terrier, I have one, and believe me, they may look like a lap dog, but in every way they have a Yorkshire personality.
Feisty, and likes to be boss,

Rachylou
16-01-2005, 19:16
i live in chesterfield now but originally from sheffield'...the people here call sheffielders dee-dahs....never understood why' but thinkin about it...dee dont do dat doh do dee den dees days!

algy
16-01-2005, 19:58
Originally posted by Fowler
Most importantly the two most common sheffield words in my opinion are

Thee = You
Tha = You

Both mean the same but are dependant on the context they are used in.
Iagree, but also remember your etiquette, "Thee Tha them as Tha's Thee." Just think on!

Don_Kiddick
18-01-2005, 16:18
Originally posted by jonluvsnique
jus been to the wbsite shown above to av a look at all this yorkshire stuff, and its all priced up in friggin american dollars!! how yorkshire is that? ee, i ask ya....:huh: :shocked:
:loopy:

It's called D I V E R S I T Y me owd :thumbsup:

We are are told we must embrace it.

screamingwitch
18-01-2005, 16:28
Originally posted by Rachylou
i live in chesterfield now but originally from sheffield'...the people here call sheffielders dee-dahs....never understood why' but thinkin about it...dee dont do dat doh do dee den dees days!

any good sheffielder will be able to translate this see if ya can

D D D Ds AR * * * * D D D Ds AR

AR D?

AR D AR

AR D L !

D AR !

O AR D AR !

me dad wrote this down on a peice of paper years ago when i was little and asked me to read it back to him,i couldnt but when he read it back to me i said

O AR!!!!!


aunty x hehehehehe :)

Lostrider
18-01-2005, 17:07
Originally posted by screamingwitch
any good sheffielder will be able to translate this see if ya can

D D D Ds AR * * * * D D D Ds AR

AR D?

AR D AR

AR D L !

D AR !

O AR D AR !

me dad wrote this down on a peice of paper years ago when i was little and asked me to read it back to him,i couldnt but when he read it back to me i said

O AR!!!!!


aunty x hehehehehe :)


These are spiders these are
Are they?
Oh Yes they Are
Are they Hell
They are
Oh yes, the are!



What about: lerusgerusandsweshd

screamingwitch
18-01-2005, 17:10
Originally posted by Lostrider
These are spiders these are
Are they?
Oh Yes they Are
Are they Hell
They are
Oh yes, the are!


correct!


What about: lerusgerusandsweshd

let us get our hands washed?
aunty xx

Tony
18-01-2005, 17:21
Originally posted by max
Sorry, forgot to translate. A snap tin is something in which one puts food for eating when away from one's home. Snap, therefore, is food.

Nooo, you put your packing up in your snap tin.

dishwasher
21-01-2005, 07:22
I've always taken snap and packing-up to be the same thing.

I remember one elected official raising eyebrows a few years ago when he lambasted another party for sanctioning 'booze and snap on t'rates'

Here's another word: grod. In my childhood it was an alternative word for a pedal bike. Is it still in use today?

Lostrider
21-01-2005, 16:49
Originally posted by dishwasher
I've always taken snap and packing-up to be the same thing.

I remember one elected official raising eyebrows a few years ago when he lambasted another party for sanctioning 'booze and snap on t'rates'

Here's another word: grod. In my childhood it was an alternative word for a pedal bike. Is it still in use today?

Your right I have been in the construction industry for over 30 years and "snap" is grub (lunch), as in Come on lads, it's snap time. or "are we havin some snap?".
Never heard a "pushbike" called a grod though.

When I was a lad in Hackenthorpe in the 50's a two wheeled push along scooter was a "scoyter" School was "scoyle" or "scosh" and telephone poles were "Tallywag poles".

Mouth was "trap" or "Gob", Ears were "tabs" ,Hands were "dannys"

Police were, (apart from the obvious) "Rozzers or Scuffers" probably because if you cheeked em, you got a scuff round the tabs or a smack in the gob.:)

muddycoffee
21-01-2005, 17:15
Originally posted by Lostrider
Police were, (apart from the obvious) "Rozzers or Scuffers" probably because if you cheeked em, you got a scuff round the tabs or a smack in the gob.:)

Rozzers is an old countrywide slang term of unsure origin, but is highly likely to come from the Yiddish for Pig.

algy
21-01-2005, 18:20
Originally posted by dishwasher
I've always taken snap and packing-up to be the same thing.

I remember one elected official raising eyebrows a few years ago when he lambasted another party for sanctioning 'booze and snap on t'rates'

Here's another word: grod. In my childhood it was an alternative word for a pedal bike. Is it still in use today?
I don't remember grod, but in the 50's we used to call our pushbikes grids or gridirons, no idea wher it came from, except a vague idea it had something to do with the speedway.

malxx
22-01-2005, 09:41
the word "snap" comes from the miners when they used take the food down underground in tins that used to "snap" closed

dishwasher
22-01-2005, 11:07
Here's another one.

Unclean on untidy reidential dwelling: a pleck

If someone's hassling you, you're being mithered. Or is it spelled mythered?

Don't know if this one's been done before.

Plain Talker
22-01-2005, 11:21
My mother used to call mimicking, or aping someone "mimmy-mawking"

Is this just an oddity, that she used to say, or does anyone else know of it's use?

my sister uses a couple of phrases to describe someone who is mucky or who is disgusting.. she calls them a "trolley-mog" or a "lop-dog".


PT

TWA756
22-01-2005, 11:34
I can remember the term mimmy-mawking being used - no idea of spelling - but have heard it used as a term for showing off, not necessarily imitating someone

dishwasher
22-01-2005, 20:15
Mimmy-mawing is imitating someone in an exadurated manner, in the context that I've heard it used.

Plain Talker
22-01-2005, 21:37
dish washer..

in a what??????? manner?

you mean taking the mick?
(but to the extreme? as in mimmy-mawking? ;) lol )

PT

dishwasher
23-01-2005, 09:10
PT

You've discovered my Achilles heel!

muddycoffee
23-01-2005, 09:20
Originally posted by algy
I don't remember grod, but in the 50's we used to call our pushbikes grids or gridirons, no idea wher it came from, except a vague idea it had something to do with the speedway.

Bikes - Pushirons

Nick Cotton
24-01-2005, 16:25
Spice - meaning sweets (cola bottles, mini eggs, those big red gob-stoppers that tasted nasty, etc).

Chuddy or Chud - meaning chewing gum.

Denk - meaning pence (don't ask me why).

Any more for any more?

Lostrider
24-01-2005, 16:56
Originally posted by Nick Cotton
Spice - meaning sweets (cola bottles, mini eggs, those big red gob-stoppers that tasted nasty, etc).

Chuddy or Chud - meaning chewing gum.

Denk - meaning pence (don't ask me why).

Any more for any more?

Denk thats a new one on me!!!

What about Prattle as in "What are you prattlin on about?".

prate
c.1420, from M.Du. praten "to prate" (c.1400), from a W.Gmc. imitative root (cf. M.L.G. praten, M.H.G. braten, Swed. prata "to talk, chatter").



A good source for the meanings of words and there date of origin can be found here: http://www.etymonline.com/ [I]

CAZZ99
28-01-2005, 16:28
Originally posted by wibbles
I'll not even go into the whole fishcake, rissole arguement a fish cake has 2 potatoe slices with fish in the middle a rissole is mashed fish potatoe

Nick Cotton
28-01-2005, 16:32
On the subject of food and regional lingo, a mate of mine from Bolton always orders 'chips and pea-wet' from the chippy. This, apparently, is chips (no suprise there), and the water from the mushy pea bowl.....sicko!

smile
30-01-2005, 07:51
hi, i am new on here, but i am from yorkshire, near sheffield and well i thought of a word that my friends at uni dont understand, so it must be a yorkshire thing. Acky, eg. the floor is lookin very acky. if i think of any others i will post um, xx smile:) xx

chillicat
30-01-2005, 16:01
Originally quoted by Plain Talker:
my sister uses a couple of phrases to describe someone who is mucky or who is disgusting.. she calls them a "trolley-mog" or a "lop-dog".


In Chapeltown, someone who was "loppy" or a "lopper" was dirty. We also used to say "lakin'" for "playing" - a Barnsley dialect word, I'm told. Something that was "chinny" was worthless or useless. The annual funfair that used to take place at Chapeltown was know as the Fear-st (Feast).

muddycoffee
30-01-2005, 20:12
Originally posted by Nick Cotton
On the subject of food and regional lingo, a mate of mine from Bolton always orders 'chips and pea-wet' from the chippy. This, apparently, is chips (no suprise there), and the water from the mushy pea bowl.....sicko!
That my friend, is the most horrible thing I have ever heard. Just the thought of it makes me get a cold ominous feeling in my throat, just as if I'm going to vom! :gag:

stevie1957
30-01-2005, 22:08
When I worked in the steel works we used to have "snap time". Which was time to eat what ever was in your snap tin. Yep snap = food.

The Sheffield use of the word "while" really confusers people new to Sheffield eg students. They are actually given advice on the Sheffield dialect .

al si thi later- Steve

lolly
12-02-2005, 19:32
Originally posted by Plain Talker
[
I was 'thrown' a year or two back, on visiting Nottingham, for the football with the blades. We went into a Chippie, near the footy ground, and asked for "a Chip Buttie, please". the chippie staff 'gormed' (looked askance) at us, and we finally got past the language barrier, and realised that what we were asking for was, in their dialect, a "chip-bap" . a chip bap, for goodness sake.

PT [/B]

in reply to this i have lived in Nottingham all my life and moved here 6 months ago! the word would have been "chip Cob". we never ever use bap! i say cob all the time here and people dont understand it. i have even been given chips and cod!

muddycoffee
12-02-2005, 19:39
Originally posted by lolly
in reply to this i have lived in Nottingham all my life and moved here 6 months ago! the word would have been "chip Cob". we never ever use bap! i say cob all the time here and people dont understand it. i have even been given chips and cod!
Lolly Cob is the word in Chesterfield too, I think you'll find lots of us sheffielders at the south end of the city are familiar with it, there's even a shop called Cob and Crumb on woodseats road

leddi
12-02-2005, 20:43
Don't know if this one is local but the other day my friend said he hair had a lot of knots in it (she isn't from sheffield) and i replied "oh is it all luggy" she had no idea what i was on about. does anyone else call a knot in their hair a 'lug'.

algy
12-02-2005, 21:23
Originally posted by leddi
Don't know if this one is local but the other day my friend said he hair had a lot of knots in it (she isn't from sheffield) and i replied "oh is it all luggy" she had no idea what i was on about. does anyone else call a knot in their hair a 'lug'.
yes, when I was a kid my mum used to comb my hair and talked about " getting the lugs out":)

muddycoffee
12-02-2005, 22:37
Me too,
I'm from Hillsborough originally and lugs in hair is familiar. Having extremely curly hair, this was a regular problem for me.
People who have straight or just wavy hait wouldn't have this problem

t020
12-02-2005, 23:57
I thought lugs were ears, e.g. Paul Sturrock's nickname is 'Luggy'?

algy
13-02-2005, 09:29
Originally posted by t020
I thought lugs were ears, e.g. Paul Sturrock's nickname is 'Luggy'?
Slight difference , lugs = knots in hair, lugs=ears is short for lugholes (or lugoiles), as in "Oppen thi lugoiles, ar tha de-af?"

muddycoffee
13-02-2005, 12:31
Originally posted by algy
Slight difference , lugs = knots in hair, lugs=ears is short for lugholes (or lugoiles), as in "Oppen thi lugoiles, ar tha de-af?"
Exactly correct in every detail Algy :thumbsup:

Nick Cotton
13-02-2005, 18:46
I have straight hair, however, have experienced lugs in it previously!

Also, 'sprout', according to my Grandad is Sheffieldish for addressing small children...as in 'now then sprout' = hello child!!

x_LoUiSe_x
23-02-2005, 17:32
well i moved to sheffield two and a half years ago from up north in middlesbrough.

when i 1st moved here i couldnt understand half of the things my partner (who is from here) was saying to me.:help:

He never used "the" in a sentence and cakes were buns and buns were bread cakes. An alley was a genel (or however its spelt). A bush was a privit. there was mardy insteady of grumpy, erm......... there was dugies instead of feet and danies in stead of hands, saying while instead of until, denk for money, pack up for lunch box, mashin for makin a cup of tea and cha for a cup of tea, and the list goes on and on and on!:rolleyes:

but 2 and a half years down the line ive picked up the lingo n now when i go back 2 visit my family in middlesbrough they have no idea what im talkin about and make fun of me coz i dont say "the" anymore! lol:P

so i guess ive got the lingo sorted now! :clap:

:hihi: :hihi:

LisaO
24-02-2005, 12:34
Originally posted by x_LoUiSe_x

but 2 and a half years down the line ive picked up the lingo n now when i go back 2 visit my family in middlesbrough they have no idea what im talkin about and make fun of me coz i dont say "the" anymore! lol:P

so i guess ive got the lingo sorted now! :clap:

:hihi: :hihi: [/B]

Haha, I know what you mean! Moved to Sheffield about 2 months ago (2 months to the day actually...freaky) and have already picked up the habit of completely omitting the word 'the' from all my sentences. My boyf (been in Sheffield nearly 2 years) loves to have a go at me because I always used to complain when he did it!

Am from Sydney but worked in Sussex before coming to Sheff. When I would come up and visit on weekends I had no idea what people were saying, was almost like a foreign accent to my 'used to broad Australian accent' ears :)

The biggest thing I had trouble with: 'owt' and 'nowt'. What the? Haven't started using it myself but I'm sure that day's not far away! Had an Aussie friend come to visit and he was amazed at my 'Pommy' accent...meanwhile the people I work with are having trouble understanding my Aus accent!

Caught between two worlds :)

probedb
24-02-2005, 19:21
Originally posted by muddycoffee
Lolly Cob is the word in Chesterfield too, I think you'll find lots of us sheffielders at the south end of the city are familiar with it, there's even a shop called Cob and Crumb on woodseats road

And the Crusty Cob on Burton Road :)

Cob is the one thing no-one could ever understand at Uni.....sausage cob, mmm.

Litotes
01-04-2005, 07:47
Been tasked with find out the origin and meaning of the following phrases - can anyone help?

"Black Dag" - I know it is Black Pudding, but what is the origin? (Black Dog pehaps)

"I'll make your clogs spark tonight" - meaning?

Much obliged if anyone can help

Litotes
01-04-2005, 08:24
Gee thanks moderators...

Living in/Moving to Sheffield really describes my post well - I am sure I'll get a load of responses mow you have decided to recategorise my post

StevieE
05-04-2005, 22:08
not all people from sheffield say words that others dont understand,sheffield lingo is easy its when youve listened to barnsley infact i would say its quite posh compard to them,the one word i find that when you go out of town people say do you want some tooooooooast hahaha we dont talk like that honest

peterdo
05-04-2005, 23:38
mardy . crying ,complaining like a spoiled child. Hi Rick I thought it was tugs in your hair and lugs were your ears:smile:

algy
06-04-2005, 08:47
Originally posted by Litotes
Been tasked with find out the origin and meaning of the following phrases - can anyone help?

"Black Dag" - I know it is Black Pudding, but what is the origin? (Black Dog pehaps)

"I'll make your clogs spark tonight" - meaning?

Much obliged if anyone can help
Don't know about Black Dag, but in the 'good' old days when 'we all had to make our own amusement', most lads wore clogs, and evenings were spent hanging around street corners, when the idea of excitement was to scrape your clogs on the causey edge and make sparks fly off the metal studs in the soles, hence 'I'll make your clogs spark tonight' means you're in for a good time.:thumbsup:

melthebell
06-04-2005, 18:05
Originally posted by Strix
[B]

Although BUNS in Liverpool are for making butties, Sheffield BUNS are sweet and sticky.



Thats the biggest bug bear i have up here, you have to ask for bread buns rather than bread cakes, me and my mates have had loads of arguements about it, they say "cakes?" cakes are sweet and sticky, i say buns are sweet and sticky :)

Also "our" fish cakes are called patties round here, i never know whether to ask for fishcakes cos i never know what im going to get, the proper 2 slices of potato with slice of fish or the crappy mashed up fishcake stuff

Badjogger
07-04-2005, 18:37
I can vaguely remember a song and the last line went:
"cus we're reight darn int coil oil whert muck splats ont winders"
and then it gave a translation which was:
"because we're right down in the basement where the filth accumulates on the casement"
Can anyone remember where this is from? Is it a film or something?

Darnall
09-08-2005, 12:58
Having read various thoroughly entertaining posts , the smile remains on my face .

As a ex- Sheffield ( Darnall ) lad, I have come across the term " Snap " in various parts of the country, especially the west midlands .

The term is used in conjunction with food, or food containers with vaying context.

I did some research into this and it appears thtait dates back to the English Civil War.

Cromwells ' new Model Army ( Roundheads) carried their provisions in a small sack slung round thier shoulder/back at ALL times, this enabled them to be very mobile and fast acting as a military force.

They were deemed to be able to " SNAP " into action at any given moment in time.

The sustenance of his soldiers , especially when on the march , did not escape Cromwell's attention .

The " SNAP " bag was indeed a major factor in the success of the roundhead armies, and subsequently a major factor in our own English History.

The term is therefore still often used in areas of the country which were Cromwellian strongholds , or became so after being over - run by the new model army. Sheffield being one of the largest supporters of Cromwell. Hope this helps ( Pete )

Grapesy
09-08-2005, 16:58
Gee Ore - the sheffield version of how the queen would say 'give over', obviously meaning 'stop it', 'pull the other one' or 'i don't believe it'

Try it on for size!

missleanne
15-08-2005, 19:04
Originally posted by extaxman
Do you know what 'mardy' means?

Every Sheffielder does but most of them have a lot of difficulty telling outsiders just what it means. Anybody care to try - must admit it's beyond me.

it means having the face on. looking down, boring and refusing to do things that maybe other people are doing, thats been mardy.

andy4107
16-08-2005, 01:45
I haven't read all the posts, so I don't know if this has been posted, but this (http://www.bbc.co.uk/southyorkshire/sense_of_place/speak_sy/index.shtml) should help you out. :D