View Full Version : Ways to stop Rabbits from chewing wooden furniture


BobbyBunny
26-07-2006, 14:20
Our rabbit Bobby is five months old (we're getting him neutered in a month) and has started to chew every piece of wood in the house. I'm simply not willing to lock him in a cage for the day and leave him there - there must be a natural way to keep him from chewing my furniture? :huh:

I don't want any chemical based products to keep him from doing this - We don't use chemicals in our food etc, so why make him ingest them if he keeps up his relentless chewing? Its not a nuisance as such, but I know we should stop these bad habits while he's still young.:)

Any help would be greatly appreciated. And as Bobby is a houserabbit, he doesn't go outside that often. He has chew toys (pieces of wood that have been dried, bits of undyed rope, recycled paper tubes, those kind of things) and is definately not doing this out of boredom or hunger, but could it just be because he's mischievous? (sp??)
Lol.
Thanks in advance!

Jess22
26-07-2006, 14:33
Good luck!!! Our rabbit chews anything, especially wall paper! he has loads of chew toys but doesn't touch them. I ended up just getting him a larger cage and leaving him in when we are out so he doesn't destroy the whole house and we can keep an eye on him. Unfortuantly it is their natural instinct so without deterring them with something like a chemical (foul smelling!) theres not a lot you can do. However if someone does suggest something I would also be very appreciative.

Lotti
26-07-2006, 14:56
You could try white vinegar...

I don't know much about house bunnies but it's supposed to deter dogs and puppies from chewing things because of it's foul taste.

However, it also has a foul smell and Takara (our pup) loves it but you could always give it a try!

Sorry, I know you were looking for training ways but this may be of use...

BobbyBunny
26-07-2006, 14:57
I'll try anything! Thankyou for the help, and Lotti, your Takara is lovely. I was looking on the thread where you posted pictures of your pets, and I love dalmatians!

Lotti
26-07-2006, 18:28
Thanks :D

She's a little star! You can always try the vinegar, if it doesn't work you could try the stuff they make for dogs, they make a bitter apple spray (dont' think we have any but I'll have a look for you) which doesn't smell but the animals don't like the taste of it.

I'm going to go and retrieve my shoe from Takara now ...

Jabberwocky
26-07-2006, 18:41
My bro told me that animals hate orange and lemon peel and smell....try rubbing the furniture with that.

BobbyBunny
26-07-2006, 18:53
My bro told me that animals hate orange and lemon peel and smell....try rubbing the furniture with that.


Well Bobby absolutely LOVES oranges! Lol
He eats them all the time.. well not all the time, but twice a week. And before anyone says it... no oranges are not bad for rabbits, as long as they are given in moderation, the same as any fruit. :P

Jabberwocky
26-07-2006, 19:17
Well thats my idea buggered then!:D

GrinderBloke
26-07-2006, 19:58
I've heard of people using both tobasco sauce! and olbas oil to deter house rabbits from chewing skirting boards! Just don't try Hendos, they will eat the skirting boards ;)

Fortunately in 10 years of house rabbit companionship we have not had a chewer.

In my experiance of being involved with house rabbits its younger rabbits which tend to nibble things, ours don't even bother with cables any longer.

Another way to deter bad behavior is a spray bottle filled with clean water, if he nibbles the skirting board, give hin a spray around his back / bottom (not in his face as you may hurt him).

Yet another way is a plastic container filled with dried pulses, give it a good noisy shake when he does wrong.

Good luck

PS please everyone with rabbits watch out for fly strike during the hot weather

GrinderBloke
26-07-2006, 20:01
Well Bobby absolutely LOVES oranges!

I think it is citrus oil rather than the flesh which will deter SOME rabbits, be careful when squeezing the fruit peel as the oil can burn soft tissues such as eyes, both human and rabbity

medusa
26-07-2006, 20:18
I've heard of people using both tobasco sauce! and olbas oil to deter house rabbits from chewing skirting boards! Just don't try Hendos, they will eat the skirting boards ;)

Unfortunately I was given the advice to try tabasco when I had a kitten who chewed wires- he left them alone for a couple of week ('great!' I thought), but then not only did he develop a taste for licking the tabasco off the wires, but also a propensity for addiction to every curry and chilli that we had for dinner.

I also have a cat who likes Olbas oil- she sits there with her eyes streaming and her face pushed into the pillow where I've dripped it.

I recognise that rabbits may be different to cats, but personally I'd try BitterBite or Bitter Apple spray. Both are very bitter tasting but harmless.

BobbyBunny
26-07-2006, 20:20
PS please everyone with rabbits watch out for fly strike during the hot weather

I just wanted to ask... what is fly strike? My Mum had a rabbit who was 7 years old who died a week ago on Sunday. He was an outdoor rabbit and one of my Uncles said he had died of fly strike, and I just wanted to know what it is.
Is it possible for indoor rabbits to get this?
Thankyou

tess667
26-07-2006, 20:52
I'd try BitterBite or Bitter Apple spray. Both are very bitter tasting but harmless.

My husband can vouch for this stuff lol, a few years back we had a little jack russell who would chew a lot, we bought this bitter apple spray and I ested it out by spraying an ice cream carton - we went out and when we came back it was still intact. The next day hubby came to eat his sandwiches at work and found they tasted vile - he had prepared them on the same worktop that I had used to spray the bitter apple stuff onto the ice cream carton!!!!

Lotti
29-07-2006, 09:33
haha tess!

Unfortunately we had no results from the bitter spray which ever one it was we bought but I know a lot of people have. If we still have it, BobbyBunny you can have it!

BobbyBunny
29-07-2006, 09:42
Thanks Lotti!!
Bobby has gradually started to get more and more mischievous.. and now he jumps on my knee when I sit on the floor. Its lovely lol.
x

Lotti
29-07-2006, 11:11
Thanks Lotti!!
Bobby has gradually started to get more and more mischievous.. and now he jumps on my knee when I sit on the floor. Its lovely lol.
x
aw bless him! he lurves you!

GrinderBloke
29-07-2006, 22:14
I just wanted to ask... what is fly strike? My Mum had a rabbit who was 7 years old who died a week ago on Sunday. He was an outdoor rabbit and one of my Uncles said he had died of fly strike, and I just wanted to know what it is.
Is it possible for indoor rabbits to get this?
Thankyou


Not pleasant, but here goes.

Fly strike is when a fly lays its eggs on an animal, the eggs hatch into maggots and eat carrier animal. Overweight, ill and rabbits with messy bottoms are particularly likely to suffer from fly strike, but any rabbit can be affected, particulrly in warm weather. When you see flies around your rabbit is at risk.

Your vet can sell you a couple of products to help prevent flies laying eggs on your rabbits (I believe these product are only available from your vet), also you should regularly (at very least daily) check your rabbits back end to make sure s/he is clean. If you see your rabbit trying to clean near to its tail, but seemingly having problems, or persistently trying to clean that area, you could possibly have problems and you need to see your vet... URGENTLY.

Yes house rabbits can get fly strike.

If you do find maggots on your rabbit, the first thing to do is wash the rear end of your rabbit to wash the maggots off. You should then immediately get your rabbit to your vet for them to ensure you have removed all the eggs/maggots. Any damage done will then need repairing. Remember the maggots eat flesh and once under the skin / inside the rabbit it is life threatening.

Having seen a few rabbits literally eaten to death, I cannot stress enough that this is a real problem. Your rabbit cannot wait a few hours to see the vet IT IS A LIFE OR DEATH EMERGENCY.

Sorry for being so graphic.

medusa
29-07-2006, 22:22
Thank you for explaining that so carefully GrinderBloke- I was trying to think of a non-terrifying way to put it but failed.

BobbyBunny
30-07-2006, 12:50
Not pleasant, but here goes.

Fly strike is when a fly lays its eggs on an animal, the eggs hatch into maggots and eat carrier animal. Overweight, ill and rabbits with messy bottoms are particularly likely to suffer from fly strike, but any rabbit can be affected, particulrly in warm weather. When you see flies around your rabbit is at risk.

Your vet can sell you a couple of products to help prevent flies laying eggs on your rabbits (I believe these product are only available from your vet), also you should regularly (at very least daily) check your rabbits back end to make sure s/he is clean. If you see your rabbit trying to clean near to its tail, but seemingly having problems, or persistently trying to clean that area, you could possibly have problems and you need to see your vet... URGENTLY.

Yes house rabbits can get fly strike.

If you do find maggots on your rabbit, the first thing to do is wash the rear end of your rabbit to wash the maggots off. You should then immediately get your rabbit to your vet for them to ensure you have removed all the eggs/maggots. Any damage done will then need repairing. Remember the maggots eat flesh and once under the skin / inside the rabbit it is life threatening.

Having seen a few rabbits literally eaten to death, I cannot stress enough that this is a real problem. Your rabbit cannot wait a few hours to see the vet IT IS A LIFE OR DEATH EMERGENCY.

Sorry for being so graphic.

Thankyou. I've looked on the internet about this, and will be checking him over frequently.
:)

Twirly
30-07-2006, 21:11
I believe rabbits have to chew to keep thier front teeth from overgrowing, I give my lop eared dwarf rabbit (buddy) a small branch from my apple tree which he loves. The apple tree is slowly diminishing

sillymoose
01-08-2006, 14:30
maybe you should keep them outside like normal rabbits.


besides if its not the wood it will be the wires, pipes, carpets and they even eat the wallpaper thats on your walls.

BobbyBunny
01-08-2006, 14:34
maybe you should keep them outside like normal rabbits.


besides if its not the wood it will be the wires, pipes, carpets and they even eat the wallpaper thats on your walls.

Why is it abnormal to keep a rabbit indoors? In my opinion (and in the opinion of a lot of vets) its abnormal to keep them outside. The dangers a rabbit faces when living outdoors are just not justifiable to but your rabbit through.

sillymoose
01-08-2006, 14:47
1 they poo everywhere
2 they eat everything which is bad for them and they could get hurt
3 they need to dig

they love to eat grass/ weeds and sunbath.

my rabbit lived out doors yes, in a very lage pen big enough for a small dog.

yes my garden had many holes in it but it neva needed cutting and my house was in one peice.

BobbyBunny
01-08-2006, 14:53
1 they poo everywhere
2 they eat everything which is bad for them and they could get hurt
3 they need to dig

they love to eat grass/ weeds and sunbath.

my rabbit lived out doors yes, in a very lage pen big enough for a small dog.

yes my garden had many holes in it but it neva needed cutting and my house was in one peice.

1. Rabbits can be house trained. My rabbit is house trained, and does his business in his litter tray.

2. There is such a thing as making your house safe for a rabbit.

3. I don't keep Bobby in the house all day. I take him outside, where he is supervised and plays for a couple of hours every day, then returns to the safety of our house.

A rabbit should never be left outdoors in a hutch/cage that is not strong enough to hold back predators, such as cats, dogs, foxes, and other animals which may try to eat your rabbit. Just the sight/sound of such a predator is enough to induce a heartattack and kill a rabbit. Rabbits are VERY timid creatures and are prey to other animals. You can't monitor your rabbit if it's outdoors all the time, so you won't see if its health declines. Rabbits are social creatures and need to be in contact with other animals. In the winter it is too cold for a rabbit to live outside. In the summer, it is generally too hot for a rabbit to live outside.
Rabbits shouldnt be shoved in a hutch in the back yard. Theyre just like cats and dogs, and need constant love and affection.

Lotti
01-08-2006, 15:30
After one of our rabbits' hutch was ripped apart and he was killed I won't have another rabbit unless it is a house rabbit.

sillymoose, like BobbyBunny said, they can be house trained and young puppies chew, so it is abnormal for you to keep them inside where they could chew a wire?

If you're going to have a pet, put the time into it to make your house safe instead of making excuses like 'normal rabbits live outdoors'.

sillymoose
01-08-2006, 15:40
well my rabbit servived for ten years outdorrs and so do many otherones in my area, it quite liked dogs and cats. as for foxes my garden is secure. give them plenty of shade in the summer, puppies only chew when their bored or teething. but there are ways around that. some ppl keep rabbits in a shed or outhouse at night to keep them protected.

Lotti
01-08-2006, 15:46
well my rabbit servived for ten years outdorrs and so do many otherones in my area, it quite liked dogs and cats. as for foxes my garden is secure. give them plenty of shade in the summer, puppies only chew when their bored or teething. but there are ways around that. some ppl keep rabbits in a shed or outhouse at night to keep them protected.

But why is that more normal than keeping one in the house? Dogs always used to be kept in kennels but now most people prefer to keep them in the house.

Foxes can get in to secure gardens, unless you've got a mesh lid over your garden, they can find their way in.

I refuse to keep another rabbit until I can keep it in the house.

BobbyBunny
01-08-2006, 15:55
well my rabbit servived for ten years outdorrs and so do many otherones in my area, it quite liked dogs and cats. as for foxes my garden is secure. give them plenty of shade in the summer, puppies only chew when their bored or teething. but there are ways around that. some ppl keep rabbits in a shed or outhouse at night to keep them protected.

Your garden is never secure from a determined fox, or even a loose ferret. Just because it likes domestic cats and dogs doesn't mean it likes strays that come up to its hutch at night and start growling and ripping at the wood to get at it. Putting a bunny in the shade in hot weather is not enough, there are risks of fly strike, heatstroke (which bunnies are easily overcome by) and all sorts of other things.
The only thing I can say is the same as Lotti - if you're going to get an animal, put research into it first and assure you can provide adequte care. Just like dogs and cats, rabbits can be trained to have good habits. Bobby is only five months old - an adolescent in rabbits years - and he's litter trained, responds to his name, and goes into his hutch (which is located in our bedroom) when I turn the light off and walk towards his hutch.
Just because rabbits have been bred for food and their fur doesn't mean things are staying that way. If I were you sillymoose, I'd visit this (www.rabbit.org) and find out the real facts about keeping a rabbit.
There are five unlucky rabbits for one lucky rabbit that survived ten years outside. I'm sorry if this thread has turned out to be a bit harsh, and to the mods I don't intend this to be offensive but I just have a passion for rabbits, and hate the way they are discriminated against by people who don't know better. No Offence sillymoose, but having a rabbit is no different to having a cat or a dog, and can be just as pleasurable and entertaining when the time and effort is put in.